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The Glass Town Game de Catherynne M. Valente
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The Glass Town Game (2017 original; edició 2017)

de Catherynne M. Valente (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
242887,762 (3.87)2
"Inside a small Yorkshire parsonage, Charlotte, Branwell, Emily, and Anne Brontë have invented a game called Glass Town, where their toy soldiers fight Napoleon and no one dies. This make-believe land helps the four escape from a harsh reality: Charlotte and Emily are being sent away to a dangerous boarding school, a school they might not return from. But on this Beastliest Day, the day Anne and Branwell walk their sisters to the train station, something incredible happens: the train whisks them all away to a real Glass Town, and the children trade the moors for a wonderland all their own."--Book jacket flap.… (més)
Membre:CharlyC
Títol:The Glass Town Game
Autors:Catherynne M. Valente (Autor)
Informació:Margaret K. McElderry Books (2017), 544 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Informació de l'obra

The Glass Town Game de Catherynne M. Valente (2017)

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Es mostren 1-5 de 8 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Delicious. The whole thing was delicious. ( )
  Annrosenzweig | Oct 15, 2021 |
Audiobook 2017:

I love Valente. Endstop. I'll probably read/listen to everything the lady puts out in every format. I've read her online journal game. I read her mailed once-a-month letters club stories for 2-3 years. I've tracked down her novellas, and drabble/snippets published across online magazines. I've belonged to her patreon since the moment it started.

I love Valente, and this was, again, no doubt of loving. This is a children's story of imagination, and our main characters are none other than the Bronte siblings. They fall into their own imaginary world, with both things (and people) they both have and haven't made up. They find themselves in amazing triumphs and deep dire straights, learning things about the worlds you make and the choices that change you as you are growing up.

I recommend this to adults who love Valente, and the four Brontes, and all children who loved Fairyland. ( )
  wanderlustlover | Aug 21, 2021 |
Thought experiment: What would it be like to transport a handful of Regency-Era children from their playtime expositions into a very real and rich toyland stolen right out of their own noggins like Athena from Zeus's brow?

Add an amazingly rich assortment of famous real and imaginary personages of the time period showing up as children's characters their own age but as dolls, luggage, rags, pins, buttons, or ANYTHING that might be found in the playroom, stir, give vivid life, and then turn it into a rich drama full of intrigue and a war between Wellington and Napoleon, and it's *almost* a smidge like a much BETTER Narnia mixed with the delightful wordplay of Valente's Fairyland books, turned Regency and Hans Christain Anderson.

And it's a pure delight. It is absolutely for young readers, Middle-Grade, apparently, but it also doesn't dumb ANYTHING down, keeping the words right but never stinting on the hard questions or the tragedies or the heartache. Would it be one of those more difficult but infinitely more rewarding books for, say, 9-year-olds? Absolutely.

Is it rich enough for any adult to be transported and delighted by the wordplay and cleverness and the realness of the tale underneath the sheer imagination? Absolutely.

Of course, I'm biased. I'm a huge fan of Valente anyway and no matter whether she's writing for adults with very, very adult themes (read pornographic) or a battle between life and death or going for the humorous angle in Space Opera or Radiance or being utterly delightful with all five of her fantastic Fairyland books, I can't seem to get enough.

She's a master of the writing craft. I have no doubt about it. :) Pure gold. ( )
1 vota bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
3.5 stars.
C. M. Valente does a fair impression of a British writer. Her humor (chiefly wry sarcasm) is sophisticated and literary as usual. Her imagery is vivid and playful. Her imagination is inexhaustible.

However,
I found myself struggling to justify the setting. You have Charlotte, Branwell, Emily, and Anne Brontë as the protagonists, underaged, with guest appearances from Byron, Mary Shelley, P. B. Shelley and others. Interesting puns and goofy side characters a la Alice in Wonderland, and a whole lot of magic. I felt that the liberties taken with the description of these historical figures, placing them in a magical world only served to strain credibility. I'm sure she knows her stuff and read biographies and what not, but the real world has very little significance in this novel. It could have been a fascinating historical novel with magical elements. That might have given it depth and more appeal for older readers. Why not just name the characters something different. Instead, the reader is constantly reminded that these are the authors of Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre. Her choice of setting allows for a wealth of literary allusions, but I argue that the allusions could have been made without resorting to directly placing those people in the story.

In any case, there are precious moments, since the narration takes place chiefly from the children's perspective. Quite a lot of cognitive dissonance, since reality blends seamlessly with dream. It takes Lewis Carroll's technique and extends it into tried and true territory, but I daresay it is not Valente's boldest or most brilliant work. The writing is clever and funny, but I found it less nuanced than Deathless and her early work. She goes for jokes sometimes, instead of meaningful emotion.

Animate toys are as serviceable as any other device. Why not add talking books? However, very rarely did I find myself lost in the story. It felt like story time, like she were making up the plot off the cuff, from a list of literary puns and images she had compiled. The tone is decidedly juvenile, unlike her recent Space Opera, but I liked it better than that book. Thus, if I had been younger I think I would have appreciated its whimsicality more, though I would not have appreciated the literary references.

Valente is one of the most exciting writers working today, and I hope she keeps experimenting and creating worlds. The tea parties and train stations and play wars just didn't lead to quite enough enjoyment for me. I rated Lewis Carroll no better, and I think this makes a case for itself as much as his crazy fantasy ever did, though this book does run a tad long. ( )
1 vota LSPopovich | Apr 8, 2020 |
A juvenile fantasy about the young Brontes and their imaginary kingdoms? I've never read the surviving Glasstown Confederacy, Gondal, and Angria poems, but the idea of them have fascinated me ever since I first heard of them.

The Glasstown Confederacy was the setting for the Bronte's games of make-believe from early childhood until, very likely, their deaths. Charlotte, Emily, Anne and Branwell all contributed to the game and while only fragments survive - lists of characters, places, etc. and poetry - it was a wellspring of creativity.

Valente has the Brontes playing together shortly before Charlotte and Emily are to be sent off to school again. This is a dreadful thing not only because of the separation, but because the family hasn't gotten over the terrible losses they suffered when, on sending the elder girls to school, they lost their two eldest sisters to a sickness that broke out at the school. When the day arrives, the children encounter a bizarre man at the train station and board an altogether different kind of train then one that would take anyone to school.

I had some trouble with the characterization of Branwell and Anne at first, but by halfway through the novel I was thoroughly enjoying the adventure Valente was taking them on. No characters are as simple as they appear and there is real affection in their treatment. The one quibble I have is how Jane Austen was treated - but Charlotte herself didn't understand her, so I suppose its fair.

With the historical and literary background of this title there may be some trouble getting it into the young hands its intended for, but this is a swell adventure story and fantasy and no context is necessary for a young reader to enjoy it. ( )
  ManWithAnAgenda | Feb 18, 2019 |
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Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Catherynne M. Valenteautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Green, RebeccaIl·lustradorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
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It seemed as if I were a non-existent shadow-- that I neither spoke, ate, imagined, or lived of myself, but I was the mere idea of some other creature's brain. The Glass Town seemed so likewise. My father . . . and everyone with whom I am acquainted, passed into a state of annihilation; but suddenly I thought again that I and my relatives did exist and yet, not us but our minds, and our bodies without ourselves. Then this supposition-- the oddest of any-- followed the former quickly, namely the WE without US were shadows; also, but at the end of a long vista, as it were, appeared dimly and indistinctly, beings that really lived in a tangible shape, that were called by our names and were US from whom WE had been copied by something -- I could not tell what.

Another world formed part of this reverie . . . England was there but totally different in manners, customs, inhabitants. -- Charlotte Brontë, Age 12
But surely you and everybody have a notion that there is, or should be, and existence of yours beyond you. -- Emily Brontë
And who can tell but Heaven, at last,
May answer all my thousand prayers,
And bid the future pay the past
With joy for anguish, smiles for tears? -- Anne Brontë
Forsooth, I'm the greatest man in the world and these ladies the best judges! -- Branwell Brontë, Age 13
Dedicatòria
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For my Heath on the moors

And, begging their forgiveness,
for four extraordinary children
I wish I could have known
Primeres paraules
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Once, four children called Charlotte, Emily, Anne, and Branwell lived all together in a village called Haworth in the very farthest, steepest, highest, northernest bit of England.
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(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
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Editor de l'editorial
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Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

"Inside a small Yorkshire parsonage, Charlotte, Branwell, Emily, and Anne Brontë have invented a game called Glass Town, where their toy soldiers fight Napoleon and no one dies. This make-believe land helps the four escape from a harsh reality: Charlotte and Emily are being sent away to a dangerous boarding school, a school they might not return from. But on this Beastliest Day, the day Anne and Branwell walk their sisters to the train station, something incredible happens: the train whisks them all away to a real Glass Town, and the children trade the moors for a wonderland all their own."--Book jacket flap.

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