IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Eothen de A. W. Kinglake
S'està carregant…

Eothen (1844 original; edició 2018)

de A. W. Kinglake (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
405849,145 (3.85)18
""My favourite travel book. Sparkling, ironic, and terrific fun."" - Jan MorrisEothen (""From the East"") recaptures a bold young Englishman's exploits in the Middle East during the 1830s. Alexander William Kinglake recounts his rambles through the Balkans, Turkey, Cyprus, Syria, Palestine, and Egypt in a style radically different from other travel books of his era. Rather than dwelling on art or monuments, Kinglake's captivating narrative focuses on the natives and their cities. His adventures - populated by Bedouins, pashas, slave-traders, monks, pilgrims, and other colourfully drawn personalities - include crossing the desolate Sinai with a four-camel caravan and a sojourn in plague-ridden Cairo. A contemporary of Gladstone at Eton and of Tennyson and Thackeray at Cambridge, Kinglake offers a frankly imperialistic worldview. ""As I felt so have I written,"" he declares in his preface, and his forthright expressions of his thoughts and impressions range in mood from confessional, to comic, to serious, to romantic. Victorian readers were captivated by Kinglake's chatty tone and his uncompromising honesty, and two centuries later this remarkable travelogue remains funny, fresh, and original.… (més)
Membre:Hemil
Títol:Eothen
Autors:A. W. Kinglake (Autor)
Informació:CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (2018), 144 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Informació de l'obra

Eothen de Alexander William Kinglake (Author) (1844)

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 18 mencions

It is almost 200 years since William Kinglake went travelling about the Ottoman Empire on the Balkan fringes before heading to Constantinople, Smyrna, Cyprus, Jerusalem, Cairo and Damascus. It is a world that has changed irrevocably since then; however, there are elements of that world still visible in ours. This almost wasn’t a book either, Kinglake had scribbled a few notes down on the back of a map for a friend who was considering taking a year off to travel too. Seven years later he had written this book.

This is not really about the places that he travels through on his journey. It is more about the people that he meets of his travels and his experiences which were quite varied from charging across a desert alone on a camel, being in a city whose population is dropping like flies with the plague, meets with an ex-pat called Lady Hester Stanhope, that knew his mother, see the Pyramids for the first time and marvels at the Sphinx.

This is the time when there are no cars or other mechanised transport so the art of travelling is a much drawn-out process. The language is quite different from our modern phrasing, but then it was written over 150 years ago. It took me a few chapters of the book to get into his style, but when he reached the desert I found that the writing was vastly better. He is a strange character in lots of ways, he has some respect for some of the people that he meets and for others, he can be quite condescending to the people he is travelling with as companions and those that he has employed to help him. Even though some of his attitudes are very alien from a modern perspective, I did like this and I can see why it is seen as a classic of travel writing. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
A young Englishman travels in the Ottoman Empire in 1800s. Displays typical English arrogance. Interesting bits about Lady Hester Stanhope, one of those eccentric Englishwomen who sought independence in the East.
  ritaer | Jan 19, 2018 |
Eccentric, endearing, and tremendously English account of travel in the Middle East around the beginning of Queen Victoria's reign. This is one of those books that I was long put off reading by a completely mistaken idea of what it was about: from a false association with the title I somehow got it into my head that it was some sort of whimsical tolkienesque thing about elves and trolls. As I should have known, Eothen is supposed to be the Greek word for "dawn".
Having sorted that little misunderstanding out, I realise why Jan Morris was so keen on Kinglake. As a writer, he's splendidly inconsequential, telling us nothing whatsoever about tourist sites, monuments, landscape, or history, but sticking firmly to the things he found entertaining or bizarre about the business of traveling. I enjoyed the little details, like the Greek sailors' St Nicholas hung up in the cabin "like a barometer", or the wonderful scene where Kinglake, on a camel in the middle of the Sinai desert, meets another Englishman heading in the opposite direction. Neither is willing to be the first to break the silence, so they pass without speaking, touching their hats to each other. It's only when their respective escorts get into conversation that they turn round and exchange a few phrases. His description of a visit to his mother's cousin, the famous Lady Hester Stanhope (Regency political hostess turned Lebanese warlord, part-time religious leader and amateur archaeologist) is another classic. I was interested by his reactions to the various religions of the region: unlike most (male) British travellers, he doesn't seem to be either seduced by virile Islam or thrown into proper Protestant indignation by the "unbiblical" Christianity of the Holy Land: he goes into a weird, Mariolatrous ecstasy in Nazareth, but then a few pages later he's being worldly and pleasantly cynical about the monks and their wine cellars. Odd, for a British writer who was more-or-less a contemporary of George Borrow.
As a traveller, though, Kinglake is every inch the "civis Britannicus sum" of the era when any act of disrespect by a foreigner stood a good chance of provoking Lord Palmerston into sending the boys round with a gunboat or two. He usually travels in perfect solitude, escorted only by a couple of servants, some interpreters and guides, a few porters, and a varying population of camel proprietors, armed guards and the like. Life was simple in those days! ( )
1 vota thorold | Dec 17, 2012 |
The Middle East in the mid-nineteenth century. A Victorian traveller's view.
  Fledgist | Dec 28, 2009 |
In de herfst van 1834 vertrok Alexander Kinglake voor een reis van 15 maanden naar het Midden-Oosten. Tien jaar later verscheen het verslag van deze reis in boekvorm. In zijn voorwoord schrijft Kinglake: "It is right to forewarn people that the book is quite superficial in character. I have endeavoured to discard from it all valuable matter derived from the work of others, and it appears to me that my efforts in this direction have been attended with great succes; I believe I may truly acknowledge, that from all details of geographical discovery, or antiquarian research- from all display of "sound learning, and religious knowledge"- from all historical and scientific illustrations- from all useful statistics- from all political distinctions- and from all good moral reflections, the volume is thoroughly free"
Wat Kinglake wel vertelt zijn die dingen die op hem indruk maakten: een genoeglijk bivak bij een kampvuur in de woestijn, de zorgen over de pestepidemie in Cairo, de manier waarop zijn tochtgenoten de medewerking afdwingen van onwillige handelaren, etc. Voor een boek dat zo lang geleden verschenen is, is het opvallend leesbaar en het behoort terecht tot de klassiekers onder de reisverhalen.
Uitgelezen: maandag 25 december 2000 ( )
  erikscheffers | Sep 15, 2009 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 8 (següent | mostra-les totes)

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (14 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Kinglake, Alexander WilliamAutorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Baker, FrankIntroduccióautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Collins, V. H.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Morris, JanIntroduccióautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Smith, H. GorvettEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Spender, HaroldIntroduccióautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

Pertany a aquestes col·leccions editorials

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Ch. 1. Over the border.)
At Semlin I still was encompassed by the scenes and the sounds of familiar life; the din of a busy world still vexed and cheered me; the unveiled faces of women still shone in the light of day. Yet, whenever I chose to look southward, I saw the Ottoman's fortress--austere, and darkly impending high over the vale of the Danube--historic Belgrade. I had come, as it were, to the end of this wheel-going Europe, and now my eyes wojuld see the Spendour and Havoc of the East.
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
The "Dromedary" of Egypy and Syria is not the two-humped camel described by that name in books of natural history, but is, in fact, of the same family as the camel, standing towards his more clumsy fellow-slave in about the same relation as a racer to a cart-horse.
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Quotation, etc. from the undated T. Nelson & Sons ed.
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

""My favourite travel book. Sparkling, ironic, and terrific fun."" - Jan MorrisEothen (""From the East"") recaptures a bold young Englishman's exploits in the Middle East during the 1830s. Alexander William Kinglake recounts his rambles through the Balkans, Turkey, Cyprus, Syria, Palestine, and Egypt in a style radically different from other travel books of his era. Rather than dwelling on art or monuments, Kinglake's captivating narrative focuses on the natives and their cities. His adventures - populated by Bedouins, pashas, slave-traders, monks, pilgrims, and other colourfully drawn personalities - include crossing the desolate Sinai with a four-camel caravan and a sojourn in plague-ridden Cairo. A contemporary of Gladstone at Eton and of Tennyson and Thackeray at Cambridge, Kinglake offers a frankly imperialistic worldview. ""As I felt so have I written,"" he declares in his preface, and his forthright expressions of his thoughts and impressions range in mood from confessional, to comic, to serious, to romantic. Victorian readers were captivated by Kinglake's chatty tone and his uncompromising honesty, and two centuries later this remarkable travelogue remains funny, fresh, and original.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.85)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3 8
3.5 2
4 10
4.5 3
5 6

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 164,632,240 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible