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Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of…
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Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orisha, 1) (edició 2018)

de Tomi Adeyemi (Autor)

Sèrie: Legacy of Orïsha (1)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
3,5611712,745 (3.95)122
Seventeen-year-old Zélie, her older brother Tzain, and rogue princess Amari fight to restore magic to the land and activate a new generation of magi, but they are ruthlessly pursued by the crown prince, who believes the return of magic will mean the end of the monarchy.
Membre:Aperdon
Títol:Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orisha, 1)
Autors:Tomi Adeyemi (Autor)
Informació:Henry Holt and Co. (BYR) (2018), Edition: First Edition, 544 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Informació de l'obra

Children of Blood and Bone de Tomi Adeyemi

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» Mira també 122 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 171 (següent | mostra-les totes)
What I like about this is the world. I like the magic system, the cultural structure, the cultural conflicts, and the motivations of the characters. Unfortunately, that wasn't enough to get me to the end of it. I will tolerate a certain amount of romance for good fantasy, but this has TWO romantic subplots plus pretty angsty platonic and familial ones. Specific to the audio, as good a narrator as Bahni Turpin is, and she is AMAZING, I don't like having multiple 1st person perspectives read by the same narrator. ( )
  Zoes_Human | Nov 27, 2021 |
There truly is nothing new under the sun. If you like standard YA fiction, you will like this book. If you're tired of standard YA fiction, this book was written for you.

After reading the first couple of chapters, I was looking forward to something new, something that broke the mold of YA, but unfortunately this book did not live up to its promise. The Yoruba religious elements were interesting, but could have been swapped out with any ancient or fictional pantheon without changing the story at all. The distinctiveness of Yoruba did not seem to affect to the story in any fundamental way.

I gave the book three stars instead of two, because I know I am personally tired of YA and there is nothing fundamentally wrong with this book. It is a good representative of its sub-genre and if that's your thing, pick it up. ( )
  LeBleuUn | Nov 14, 2021 |
After all the hype, I expected something much more impressive. Not unreadable but meandering and clumsy. ( )
  fionaanne | Nov 11, 2021 |
Und wieder mal Fantasy zur Abwechslung. Hier hatte ich eigentlich mehr erwartet - was ich bekommen habe, ist ein Fantasyroman mit einem interessanten Setting, aber relativ eindimensionalen Charakteren und ein bis zwei eher schwachen Liebesgeschichten. Natürlich muss man dazu sagen, dass ich ja auch nicht die eigentliche Zielgruppe bin. Als Jugendliche hätte ich das wahrscheinlich anders gesehen. Aber gerade mit Fantasyromanen und Dystopien aus dem Bereich Young Adult habe ich zuvor schon gute Erfahrungen gemacht, deshalb habe ich es versucht. ( )
  Ellemir | Nov 9, 2021 |
The “Black Panther with magic” hype is real—as long as you add, “for young adults”. Just the fact that I had to fill my head with a lineup of almost exclusively black characters was refreshing, but getting to see them in roles of power instead of the usual historical situations (slavery, colonialism) was pretty darn awesome.

Adeyemi definitely has talent, and I look forward to seeing it develop. I was particularly impressed with the character development of the royal siblings, Prince Inan and Princess Amari. Though not perfectly smooth, their growth surprised me with their complexity: Amari was the one who inevitably rebelled against her father, but her rise to confidence was not immediate or quick—it still felt a bit abrupt when it came, but she did earn it. And Inan was a surprisingly complex villain: the arc I expected was the diehard enemy who is converted the moment meets (and swoons for) the heroine, but Inan’s reasons for obeying his father are complex, and his ultimate decision to betray Zelie and his sister is his own organic decision based on his lived experience.

With all that said, the plot of this YA fantasy novel is pretty classic YA fantasy novel: There’s nothing super revolutionary here, and I think that’s in large part due to a lack of description. Adeymi sprinkles the text with Yoruba words (or so I believe, from other reviews), but there’s rarely an explanation of what those words mean: you might understand that it’s clothing, or a building of some kind, but unless you're more familiar with Nigerian culture than I am, you don’t know what kind of clothing, or how you should visualize the structure.

For example, the very first chapter drops us in on the action, as Zelie squares off against an opponent in a martial arts class. I had absolutely no idea what kind of environment they were in: a stone building? an underground room like a kiva? a Bedouin-style tent? an adobe building? a wooden structure? I ran through all these ideas but didn't guess that it was wood until Zelie stepped outside, a whole chapter into the book. I still don’t know how I should have imagined the walls. Later, I had a decent idea of how to imagine the slums outside the capital city, but not really any image of the palace or the market. (I guiltily went with an ancient Egyptian look.) I assume that a Nigerian-inspired temple ruin would look very different from the temple ruins I might think of, but I felt like I didn’t get much to go. And I threw up my metaphorical hands entirely about a fantasy industrial city and fortress, especially when I couldn't figure out if the whole fortress was made of metal or just the room where Zelie was being held.

I say all this as someone who absolutely loves world building and complex new cultures. I’m usually pretty good at envisioning new environments, but I struggled significantly with Children of Blood and Bone and it definitely impacted my enjoyment.

The world building also didn’t quite seem to hold together with one of the fundamental elements of the story: the magic. Maybe I just read the book too quickly, but somehow it felt like not everything added up. I wasn’t totally clear on how magic completely disappeared in the first place, I didn’t understand why blood magic almost killed Zelie’s mother but untrained kids did it without requiring healing magic. I didn’t understand how or why Zelie just lost her magic, or how it came back again--it felt a bit too deus ex machina to me--and I don’t understand how or why Zelie was a good person to try to teach Inan how to control his powers when she could barely control hers (408). I mean, I know it was just a situation contrived to give them some alone time, only slightly less contrived than that some older teenagers with an urgent, save-the-world deadline would agree with a kid’s plan to party before they actually, you know, save the world (392). I mean, come on. And the epilogue stunner--that, apparently, everyone now has magic (or at least white hair)?--takes some of the wind out of Amari’s sails. Part of her character growth, to me, was that she was gaining confidence in herself even as those around her were getting more powerful. The big final reveal suggests that this might not be the case anymore.

Finally, as you probably have guessed, a big way that this book was (to me) disappointingly like so many other YA novels is the insta-romance. Ugh. Hot and heavy and very much not my cup of tea at all. I just can’t fathom how someone who can hate the king so much for killing her family can just fall for the prince who killed all her neighbors just because she thinks he’s hot. I know I don’t totally understand how lust works, but there are some obstacles that just seem like they should be impossible to overcome.

None of the negatives I’ve listed about this book take away how important it is that Children of Blood and Bone is showing teens images of powerful young black people, especially since not all of them get their power from magic. Social commentators much savvier than I am pointed out that when Tiana in Disney’s The Princess and the Frog spent most of the movie as a frog, it denied young black children a chance to see a strong black character in action. Children of Blood and Bone doesn’t seem to suffer this issue (though more savvy commentators might disagree—I’ll have to check), and even has characters with different shades of skin color, so that children have a better chance to find someone to identify with.

I may not be totally on board with the plot, and I may kind of think that the level of description better suits the screenplay that is, apparently, being developed than a written book—but I think (I hope) that Children of Blood and Bone is part of a cultural wave that will start changing American culture for the better. That’s worth giving the sequel a read, in my book.


Note
I read an advanced reader’s copy of this book, and since school kept me from reading it until after the publication date, I went down to the Union Square Barnes & Noble to check out the final published version. I actually struggled to find it at first—it wasn’t prominently on display at the beginning of the YA section, and even though it’s still on multiple YA bestseller lists, it wasn’t on B&N’s YA bestseller shelf. I finally found it on one of the tables near the front of the YA section…but on a low shelf near the ground. I know publishers have to pay to place books in better positions, but given the book’s status, I was very surprised to find it there.

The map that I’d longed for was present, though not particularly helpful, since the proportions didn’t seem to match the timeline of the story. (This is not at all unusual.) There wasn’t a glossary of Yoruba words to provide the details that I’d needed. There was, however, the longest and most perplexing acknowledgements section that I have ever read. I usually read all acknowledgements, even those that just list names, because I figure that nobody else will, and that’s a shame since the author thinks they’re worthy of mention. But the acknowledgements at the back of this book were several pages long, even when set in a smaller font than the rest of the book. Sections felt like fangirling about celebrities that, so far as I could tell, had no major personal influence on the author—which is cute if done sparingly, but the acknowledgements were so long and so jarring that I felt catapulted out of the mood that the book had cast…a couple days after I’d actually finished the book. We have blogs and social media for that kind of thing.


Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this review are my own and do not reflect those of my employer. ( )
  books-n-pickles | Oct 29, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 171 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Digesting volumes of brutal and downtrodden images can be dangerous. It can lead to despair, paralysis, and/or self-fulfilling prophecies of further demise. Millions of people are ordinarily numb to the fact that hyper-violence and wretched Africanized worlds are hallmarks of modern media (esp. Hollywood), and accept it wholesale. Remarkably though, Adeyemi inserts a critical lifeline into this abyss–the concept that the Gods of one’s own ancestors (in this case the Orisha) provide salvation unlike any other.
 
If a “Black Lives Matter–inspired fantasy novel” sounds like an ungainly hybrid—a pitch gone wrong—think again... The creator of a mythical land called Orïsha, Adeyemi taps into a rich imaginative lineage as she weaves West African mythology into a bespoke world that resonates with our own.
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (2 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Tomi Adeyemiautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Collins, PatrickDissenyadorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Jansson, CarinaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Thompson, KeithMap illustrationautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Turpin, BahniNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Verheijen, AngeliqueTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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I try not to think of her.
But when I do, I think of rice.
When mama was around, the hut always smelled of jollof rice.
I think about the way her dark skin glowed like the summer sun, the way her smile made Baba come alive. The way her white hair fuzzed and coiled, an untamed crown that breathed and thrived.
I hear the myths she would tell me at night. Tzain's laughter when they played agbon in the park.
Baba's cries as the soldiers wrapped a chain around her neck. Her screams as they dragged her into the dark.
The incantations that spewed from her mouth like lava. The magic of death that led her astray.
I think about the way her corpse hung from that tree.
I think about the king who took her away.
Dedicatòria
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To Mom and Dad
who sacrificed everything to give me this chance.
To Jackson
who believed in me and this story long before I did.
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Pick me.
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Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

Seventeen-year-old Zélie, her older brother Tzain, and rogue princess Amari fight to restore magic to the land and activate a new generation of magi, but they are ruthlessly pursued by the crown prince, who believes the return of magic will mean the end of the monarchy.

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