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Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People…
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Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race: The #1 Sunday… (2017 original; edició 2018)

de Reni Eddo-Lodge (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
9593516,056 (4.23)52
In 2014, award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote on her blog about her frustration with the way that discussions of race and racism in Britain were being led by those who weren't affected by it. Her words hit a nerve. The post went viral and comments flooded in from others desperate to speak up about their own experiences. Galvanised, she decided to dig into the source of these feelings. Exploring issues from eradicated black history to the inextricable link between class and race, Reni Eddo-Lodge has written a searing, illuminating, absolutely necessary examination of what it is to be a person of colour in Britain today --… (més)
Membre:thompsonbenjy1
Títol:Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race: The #1 Sunday Times Bestseller
Autors:Reni Eddo-Lodge (Autor)
Informació:Bloomsbury Publishing (2018), Edition: 01, 288 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race de Reni Eddo-Lodge (2017)

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» Mira també 52 mencions

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i wish this had gone deeper, but it's always good for me (white people) to continue to hear the basics about racism from different perspectives. everyone talks about it a little differently, and so certain ideas and concepts will resonate with different people, so the more i hear these things, the more i am taking in and mulling over and understanding, the more viscerally i am feeling all of this. while i was reading, i was wishing there was more depth, but there really is value in hearing these ideas again.

and there is definitely value in hearing them from a non-american. i didn't know a lot of what she was talking about, relative to british government, but hearing how much the experience of british people of color mirrors that of americans of color was really interesting. it makes sense in today's age that the experiences would be similar, when everything happening all over is at easy access and can build on each other, but this was true decades before the internet and live television. racism has unfolded around the world in very similar ways. this is important to know in order to fight it.

i also liked the reminder to view racism as a white person the way i view patriarchy and sexism as a female person. it's been a useful thought experiment in the past for me to gain understanding, and she went into detail about this in a helpful way.

"We don't live in a meritocracy, and to pretend that simple hard work will elevate all to success is an exercise in willful ignorance."

"Not seeing race does little to deconstruct racist structures or materially improve the conditions which people of colour are subject to daily. In order to dismantle unjust, racist structures, we must see race. We must see who benefits from their race, who is disproportionately impacted by negative stereotypes about their race, and to who power and privilege is bestowed upon - earned or not - because of their race, their class, and their gender. Seeing race is essential to changing the system."

every time i see this quote by martin luther king, i note it: "'First, I must confess that over the last few years I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro's great stumbling block in the stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen's Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate who is more devoted to 'order' than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says 'I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I can't agree with your methods of direct action'; who paternalistically feels he can set the timetable for another man's freedom; who lives by the myth of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait until a 'more convenient season.' / Shallow understanding from people of goodwill is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.'"

"'And there's an element of just speaking the truth of what it means to be a black woman...that it would be ridiculous, as a white person, to not read that as implicating you.'"

"If feminism can understand the patriarchy, it's important to question why so many feminists struggle to understand whiteness as a political structure in the very same way." ( )
  overlycriticalelisa | Mar 25, 2021 |
After her blog post of the same title went viral in Britain, award-winning journalist Eddo-Lodge elaborated in book form. She expresses frustration with the way race and racism is discussed by those who are unaffected by it, and explores topics like white dominance, the inextricable ties between race and class, and the ways in which Black history has been strategically eradicated—as well as strategies for countering the racism that still exists in modern society. More than that, D.L. Mullen—proprietor of Semicolon Bookstore & Gallery in Chicago—says the book offers an important reminder: “It is not the place of people of color to do the work of breaking down racism. Publisher
  stlukeschurch | Mar 9, 2021 |
A good book should make you think about the world, how you see it and where you fit in.

A GREAT book should question your views and beliefs. It should turn your thoughts upside down and see things you never saw before, think about things in a way you haven't thought about them before.

This book did all those things. Powerful writing. ( )
  Timwindram | Feb 28, 2021 |
I always wondered why race relations are different in Europe, and why white Europeans deny racism in themselves and constantly call the U. S. racist. I grew up in a racist environment in a southern state, I know the racism that holds people down, that held my parents down and that I am still trying to get loose from. So, to read this very clear and honest telling by Eddo-Dodge of the constant, ingrained, act of covering up the history of Blacks/Africans in The UK was a balm to my psyche. Eddo-Dodge puts an end to the gaslighting of Black's and other non-white communities by British whites and tells the story that no one wants to hear, but needs to be told because continuing to deny the telling of the history of slavery and racial discrimination in Europe is, in fact, racist and the continuation of enslavement of another kind. ( )
  amberluscious | Feb 11, 2021 |
I wanted to like this and enjoyed the first third but then really struggled with the rest. A lot of unsubstantiated assertions which I found very unconvincing. Made me think about it all which was helpful. ( )
  PGWilliams71 | Jan 31, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 35 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Reni Eddo-Lodge has become the first black British author to take the overall No 1 spot in the UK’s official book charts. Eddo-Lodge's Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race topped Nielsen BookScan's UK top 50 in the week to 13 June, making her the first black British author to take the top slot since Nielsen began recording book sales in 2001. The only black author to have taken the No 1 spot on the overall charts is the former US first lady Michelle Obama in 2018, with her memoir Becoming. In 2016, analysis from the Bookseller found that a writer was more likely to make it into the bestseller charts if their name was David than if they were from an ethnic minority.

Eddo-Lodge responded to news of her achievement on Twitter. "Feels absolutely wild to have broken this record," she wrote. "My work stands on the shoulders of so many black British literary giants - Bernadine Evaristo, Benjamin Zephaniah, Zadie Smith, Andrea Levy, Stella Dadzie, Stuart Hall, Linton K Johnson, Jackie Kay, Gary Younge - to name a few." Last week, Eddo-Lodge became the first black British author to be No 1 on the non-fiction paperback charts, which she called "a horrible indictment of the publishing industry". "Can't help but be dismayed by this - the tragic circumstances in which this achievement came about,” she wrote. "The fact that it's 2020 and I'm the first."
afegit per Cynfelyn | editaThe Guardian, Alison Flood (Jun 16, 2020)
 
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In 2014, award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge wrote on her blog about her frustration with the way that discussions of race and racism in Britain were being led by those who weren't affected by it. Her words hit a nerve. The post went viral and comments flooded in from others desperate to speak up about their own experiences. Galvanised, she decided to dig into the source of these feelings. Exploring issues from eradicated black history to the inextricable link between class and race, Reni Eddo-Lodge has written a searing, illuminating, absolutely necessary examination of what it is to be a person of colour in Britain today --

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