IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

فرانكشتاين في بغداد…
S'està carregant…

فرانكشتاين في بغداد Frankenstein in Baghdad (2013 original; edició 2013)

de Ahmed Saadawi (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
5262335,470 (3.65)97
After he constructs a corpse from body parts found on the street, Hadi wants the government to prepare a proper burial, but when the corpse goes missing, a series of strange murders occur and Hadi realizes he has created a monster.
Membre:jcbrannen
Títol:فرانكشتاين في بغداد Frankenstein in Baghdad
Autors:Ahmed Saadawi (Autor)
Informació:منشورات الجمل al Kamel (2013), 352 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Frankenstein in Baghdad de Ahmed Saadawi (2013)

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 97 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 23 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Hadi is a Junk Dealer in US-occupied Baghdad in early 2000s (we get a dateline from the first chapter but I will get to it in a bit). His job is to buy (or find) things people do not want and sell them to people who do. And while he deals with people's junk, he realizes that human parts are treated as trash - the violence of the street often ends up with human parts all over the place and these are just swept with the rest of the trash. So he decides to start collecting them, making complete people out of it and then selling (or giving away) the resulting complete corpse to the hospitals - so they can be properly buried.

He lives in part of the city where you can see everything that the country has to offer - the madwoman Elishva, a Christian widow who lost her son in one of the wars earlier, a coffee shop on the corner, a hotel owner, trying and failing to keep his business afloat, a real estate dealer who seems to be the only one who actually is doing well (how honestly he does that is a different story). But because he is always on the road (his business requires it), he manages to be everywhere else - including close to the US embassy. Add to that a young journalist with his own dark history and his boss (who seems to have his own agenda) and the very driven lead of the Tracking and Pursuit Department. Which brings us back to the beginning of the novel and how the whole book is presented - it starts with a final secret report which orders for the author and the book to be essentially disappeared.

With this opening and the cast of characters, the book would have had enough going. But then there is Whatitsname. Remember the body parts that Hadi was collecting? By some chance, at the moment when the body is complete, a young man dies and his soul ends up in the new body. And Whatitsname is born - and he needs to avenge the death of everyone who had become a part of him. Except that dead parts don't survive long so he needs to repair himself, adding more parts... adding more revenge. And the department responsible for tracking him is the Tracking and Pursuit Department - the guys who deal with the unusual.

The realism of the story of Baghdad at the time merges with the Whatitsname's story to give the whole novel a Gothic feeling with an Eastern flavor. There are two different stories - one rooted into reality and that could have been and one in the speculative realm which if you squint can be dismissed as hallucinations I guess (leaving this as a realistic novel and finding a way to make the fantastical elements as metaphors) but that will be a disservice to the novel. It weaves the two together on purpose and makes them a whole without throwing the story out from reality. And somewhere in there, while Whatitsname starts finding his own humanity, other characters lose theirs (or show that they never had it). At some points Whatitsname is the most humane of all characters in a chapter and that gives you a pause. The title is not random - and not just on the surface.

The story was never going to be a happy one - there are way too many broken people and the constant violence in Iraq does not help much. That beginning already tells you that the powers that be will manage to suppress the knowledge of Whatitsname. But we still get to see the collapsed society and the wounded pride of an old city.

How much one wants to read that as an allegory is up to the reader. It is easy to find parallels if you want to - and even if you do not, the story makes you stop and think more often than not. It has a Scheherazade's quality to it, even in the story of Whatitsname - the same way how she always needs to keep telling stories to live, Whatitsname needs to keep revenging and adding new pieces so he can live. Strip that story and you still have a portrait of a city and its people - at a time where being good is almost dangerous and trust will cause you issues.

It is not an easy novel and it can be disorienting in places - it can feel like it is going on and on in places where you want it to speed and then it speeds through a part where you want it to linger. And yet, I dare you to not finish it (if you do not leave it after the first pages - the style can take somewhat of a getting used to and the initial chapters are almost mundane). Enjoying it is probably not the word I would use for it - the novel is bleak and foreboding. But I would recommend it to anyone who reads cross-genres - I suspect that it won't work very well for people that read only speculative fiction or just realistic one - the mix of them is what makes the novel and what makes it stay in your mind of a long time after you finish it. ( )
1 vota AnnieMod | Aug 10, 2021 |
I enjoyed this novel, but I suspect there's much more to it than I can grasp as someone very unfamiliar with Iraq beyond headlines and basic history. There's a sense of inevitability, chaos, violence, and this feeling of a "true" Baghdad buried under the surface---in some ways literally---an ancient city of peace, prosperity, and grandeur, and a modern one of little boys in soccer leagues. ( )
  ImperfectCJ | Mar 15, 2021 |
Baghdad, a city torn apart by conflict, where car bombs sow death on a numbingly regular basis. Baghdad, a city where the balance between different cultures and faiths, delicate at the best of times, is jeopardised by covert lobbies and political pressure groups. Baghdad, a city whose sons and daughters are sacrificed – lost or dead in wars, or emigrants in foreign countries, lured by the promise of peace.

These daily horrors are transformed by Ahmed Saadawi into a contemporary Gothic novel, in which the violence which stalks the streets of Baghdad is personified in the figure of the monstrous “Whatsisname”. Pieced together by Hadi the Junk Dealer from body parts of car bomb victims, the Whatsisname is animated by the soul of Hasib Mohamed Jaafar, a hotel guard killed in a terrorist attack. The spark which joins body and soul is the constant prayer of old Elishva, who has not yet lost hope of the return of her son Daniel, lost decades before in the Iran-Iraq War. The “Whatsitsname” embarks on a mission of righteous revenge against criminals, only to become himself (itself?) drawn into a vicious cycle of violence.

Frankenstein in Baghdad won its author the International Prize for Arabic Fiction in 2014 and is now available in a brilliant English translation by Jonathan Wright. It was suggested to me by my Goodreads friend Alan as a work of “Iraqi Gothic”. And “Gothic” it certainly is. After all, it features a monster nicknamed by the Baghdadi newspapers as “Frankenstein”, it contains brief but stomach-churning passages of body horror and it recycles and adapts several tropes of the genre. The ruins of old are replaced by bombed-out buildings, the cemeteries substituted by the tragic scenes following the umpteenth terrorist attack. There is also more than a nod to the Gothic in the fragmented narrative and the recurring theme of mistaken identities. Thus, the book opens with a “Final Report” about the shadowy “Tracking and Pursuit Department” which casts doubt on the veracity of the whole story as presented to us. Part of the novel is a transcript of an interview recorded by the monster himself or, possibly, an impostor posing as him. Throughout, there is a sense that “nothing is but what is not”.

Yet, particularly in its initial chapters, what the novel reminded me of were not the classics of the Gothic but, rather, the works of Mikhail Bulgakov. In fact, as in Bulgakov, the fantastical elements often have a whimsical, surreal, fairy-tale tinge quite unlike traditional “supernatural” fiction – saints speak from icons, astrologers assist the army, the souls of the dead meet for chats. There is also a strong streak of dark humour and satire which sometimes had me laughing aloud. Admittedly, the novel becomes increasingly grim as it progresses and the final scene is poignant, bleak and very effective.

It was recently announced that the novel would be turned into a film. I certainly look forward to that. This unusual and striking novel certainly deserves to be well-known. ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Mar 5, 2021 |
Baghdad, a city torn apart by conflict, where car bombs sow death on a numbingly regular basis. Baghdad, a city where the balance between different cultures and faiths, delicate at the best of times, is jeopardised by covert lobbies and political pressure groups. Baghdad, a city whose sons and daughters are sacrificed – lost or dead in wars, or emigrants in foreign countries, lured by the promise of peace.

These daily horrors are transformed by Ahmed Saadawi into a contemporary Gothic novel, in which the violence which stalks the streets of Baghdad is personified in the figure of the monstrous “Whatsisname”. Pieced together by Hadi the Junk Dealer from body parts of car bomb victims, the Whatsisname is animated by the soul of Hasib Mohamed Jaafar, a hotel guard killed in a terrorist attack. The spark which joins body and soul is the constant prayer of old Elishva, who has not yet lost hope of the return of her son Daniel, lost decades before in the Iran-Iraq War. The “Whatsitsname” embarks on a mission of righteous revenge against criminals, only to become himself (itself?) drawn into a vicious cycle of violence.

Frankenstein in Baghdad won its author the International Prize for Arabic Fiction in 2014 and is now available in a brilliant English translation by Jonathan Wright. It was suggested to me by my Goodreads friend Alan as a work of “Iraqi Gothic”. And “Gothic” it certainly is. After all, it features a monster nicknamed by the Baghdadi newspapers as “Frankenstein”, it contains brief but stomach-churning passages of body horror and it recycles and adapts several tropes of the genre. The ruins of old are replaced by bombed-out buildings, the cemeteries substituted by the tragic scenes following the umpteenth terrorist attack. There is also more than a nod to the Gothic in the fragmented narrative and the recurring theme of mistaken identities. Thus, the book opens with a “Final Report” about the shadowy “Tracking and Pursuit Department” which casts doubt on the veracity of the whole story as presented to us. Part of the novel is a transcript of an interview recorded by the monster himself or, possibly, an impostor posing as him. Throughout, there is a sense that “nothing is but what is not”.

Yet, particularly in its initial chapters, what the novel reminded me of were not the classics of the Gothic but, rather, the works of Mikhail Bulgakov. In fact, as in Bulgakov, the fantastical elements often have a whimsical, surreal, fairy-tale tinge quite unlike traditional “supernatural” fiction – saints speak from icons, astrologers assist the army, the souls of the dead meet for chats. There is also a strong streak of dark humour and satire which sometimes had me laughing aloud. Admittedly, the novel becomes increasingly grim as it progresses and the final scene is poignant, bleak and very effective.

It was recently announced that the novel would be turned into a film. I certainly look forward to that. This unusual and striking novel certainly deserves to be well-known. ( )
  JosephCamilleri | Sep 12, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 23 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (21 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Ahmed Saadawiautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Ramirez, JasonDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Teresi, BarbaraTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Wright, JonathanTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

Pertany a aquestes col·leccions editorials

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Yet I ask you not to spare me: listen to me; and then, if you can, and if you will, destroy the work of your hands.
-Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
The king ordered that the saint be placed in the olive press until his flesh was torn to pieces and he died. They then threw him out of the city, but the Lord Jesus gathered the pieces together and brought him back to life, and he went back into the city.
-The Story of St. George, the Great Martyr
You who are listening to these recordings now, if you don't have the courage to help me with my noble mission, then at least try not to stand in my way.
-The Whatitsname
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
With regard to the activities of the Tracking and Pursuit Department, which is partially affiliated to the civil administration of the international coalition forces in Iraq, the special committee of inquiry set up under my chairmanship, with representatives of the Iraqi security and intelligence agencies and observers from US military intelligence, has come to the following conclusions:
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Fear of the Wahtsitsname continued to spread.  In Sadr City they spoke of him as a Wahhabi, in Adamiya as a Shiite extremist.  The Iraqi government described his as an agent of foreign powers, while the spokesman for the U.S. State Department said he was an ingenious man whose aim was to undermine the American project in Iraq.

But what project might that be?  As far as Brigadier Majid was concerned, the monster was their project.  It was the Americans who were behind this monster.  (p. 268)
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

After he constructs a corpse from body parts found on the street, Hadi wants the government to prepare a proper burial, but when the corpse goes missing, a series of strange murders occur and Hadi realizes he has created a monster.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.65)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 6
2.5 1
3 22
3.5 5
4 36
4.5 8
5 9

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 162,547,144 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible