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The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities: A…
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The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities: A Yearbook of Forgotten Words (edició 2017)

de Paul Anthony Jones (Autor)

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708307,445 (4.6)4
'Brilliant for anyone interested in the effervescent oddness of English' --Stig Abell on Word Drops This is the perfect language gift book: a surprising or obscure word for every day of the year. Paul Anthony Jones has unearthed a wealth of wonderful and strange words: dip into this beautifully designed book to be delighted and intrigued throughout the year. Illuminating some aspect of that day, or simply informing and entertaining, each word reveals a story: 1 January: quaaltagh (n.) the first person you meet on New Year's Day 2 January: fedifragous (adj.) promise-breaking, oath-violating In The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities you might explore etymological origins, learn about linguistic trivia, or wonder at the web of connections within the English language. Written with humour and a light touch that belies the depth of research it contains, this is both a fascinating compendium of etymology and a delightfully entertaining miscellany.… (més)
Membre:Bob_In_Trouble
Títol:The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities: A Yearbook of Forgotten Words
Autors:Paul Anthony Jones (Autor)
Informació:Elliott & Thompson (2017), 384 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities: A Yearbook of Forgotten Words de Paul Anthony Jones

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I love reading random facts. I also have a fascination with the English language. The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities is filled with forgotten words which lead to an explanation of the origin of the words themselves. There is an entry for every day of the year. I actually read this as a book which I definitely do not recommend as it gets a bit dry but reading one entry per corresponding day would be a lot of fun. I am actually reading it again that way. It would definitely be a fun and welcome present for anyone who likes random facts and learning about obscure words. ( )
  Veronica.Sparrow | Mar 3, 2021 |
*I was given an ARC of this book through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.*

This book is so fun! I ended up devouring it and can't wait to use some of these words in my daily life. The stories behind some of the words is so entertaining and I found myself laughing sometimes. I learned so much. What a great resource, and so fun too. I would recommend this to anyone. 5 out of 5 stars. ( )
  Beammey | Nov 2, 2020 |
The English language has a huge number of words; there are over 170,00 words in current use and over 45,000 words that are now considered obsolete. As the average person in the street has a vocabulary of around 20,000–35,000 words meaning for almost everyone there is a whole world of undiscovered words and their meanings for us to discover. One man who is aiming to unlock this Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities for us all is Paul Anthony Jones. He is the man behind Haggard Hawks, another wonderful place for everything wordy and some fiendishly difficult anagrams, and boy has he found some corkers in this book.

Some words here will make you smile, some will make you wince, but this is a cabinet full of precious treasure, an etymological gold mine. It is a labyrinth as one word leads to another and yet another word loops back past. We will learn the origins and root of words like viaticated, something that you will need to be for this journey, when you’ll need a paragrandine, just what the noise is that the word mrkgnao describes. Whilst all of this may seem mysterifical, you will start to become someone who could be called a sebastianist as you uncover this etmological Wunderkammer. You will learn how long a smoot is, when you need to scurryfunge a house, and just what a yule-hole is and at the end of all that you’ll either be a word-grubber or be in need of a potmeal

Not only is this a book for those that love all things about the English language, Paul Anthony Jones has written a book for the general reader too. Each day of the year has been given a unique word, that is either relevant for that day, or is picking up on the threads earlier in the year. There is a little history behind the word and often more in the text as I can imagine that this could have been twice the size. The first word I looked up was my birthday, as I guess that most people will do, followed by family members and other significant dates. Thankfully it is very readable and can be dipped into as and when you want to. It is great follow up to the Accidental Dictionary and I will be reading his other books, Word Drops, when I can squeeze it in. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
When I first opened The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities, I thought it might feel like reading a dictionary or an encyclopedia but even though there is so much to take in, I just couldn't get enough of it. I read it as if a month was a chapter, but I also found myself flicking forward each day to see what the word of the day was and what fascinating little-known historical event I could regale my family and friends with.

It is a treasure trove of interesting words and historical information and how the author links history to the word of the day is nothing short of brilliant. It's a word of the day, a history lesson, and a fascinating fact book that would be the PERFECT gift for that person who is so difficult to buy for. I've always preferred real books to kindle, but I really do think you would benefit from a hardback edition of this book. It's a book you will always have to hand, whether you refer to it every day or bring it out when friends come round.

I can see my copy of The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities being a firm fixture in my bookcase. Actually, it will probably be as much out of the bookcase as in it, as I can't foresee a day going by when I won't open this fascinating book. In years to come I may have to rein in my bookish-OCD and see a dog-eared copy as a much loved, much handled book rather than a mistreated book. There's sure to be a word for such a well-used book so I'd better keep my eye on Haggard Hawks!

The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities is an awe-inspiring collection of trivia and fascinating facts for linguists, history lovers or anyone who loves the unusual and peculiar. Definitely one I recommend and this is one book I will not be lending to anyone as I couldn't bear not to have it close to hand.

I chose to read an ARC and this is my honest and unbiased opinion. ( )
  Michelle.Ryles | Mar 9, 2020 |
Linguistics is fascinating, even if it's not my area of expertise in anthropology. As a writer and poet, I love language and playing with words! Learning words lost to time is fun, and Jones' A Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities didn't disappoint. There's a word for each day of the year, with a bit about how it entered the language, and a little trivia story that applies to said word. I learned so many new words, now squirreled away for later use in my own writing. I loved learning the bits of history too. So many things I didn't know. Sometimes it can be quite humbling to think about the weight of time and history, of all that's come before, and faded into obscurity. To think, some day linguists, and other curious folk will be looking back on our time, pondering words lost, or mutated, conjuring images of an era long lost with snapshots of history.

Among the words I learned were esculate, esculation, and luscition, all of which refer to closing or blinding an eye, or being purblind. I'm missing an eye, so these were all very relevant. The story accompanying esculate is an apocryphal legend about the famous Admiral Nelson putting a telescope to his blind eye and saying he didn't see the signal to retreat.

Then there was arsefeet, a colloquial term used to describe a penguin. Agerasia refers to looking younger than actual age. That trivia bite discussed the first use of the abbreviation OMG. It was 1917. Wow!This book is perfect for word lovers, and those who enjoy trivia! Well worth the read.

***Many thanks to the Netgalley & University of Chicago Press for providing an egalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. ( )
  PardaMustang | Jan 21, 2020 |
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'Brilliant for anyone interested in the effervescent oddness of English' --Stig Abell on Word Drops This is the perfect language gift book: a surprising or obscure word for every day of the year. Paul Anthony Jones has unearthed a wealth of wonderful and strange words: dip into this beautifully designed book to be delighted and intrigued throughout the year. Illuminating some aspect of that day, or simply informing and entertaining, each word reveals a story: 1 January: quaaltagh (n.) the first person you meet on New Year's Day 2 January: fedifragous (adj.) promise-breaking, oath-violating In The Cabinet of Linguistic Curiosities you might explore etymological origins, learn about linguistic trivia, or wonder at the web of connections within the English language. Written with humour and a light touch that belies the depth of research it contains, this is both a fascinating compendium of etymology and a delightfully entertaining miscellany.

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