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White Fragility : Why It's So Hard for White…
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White Fragility : Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism (2018 original; edició 2018)

de Robin J. DiAngelo

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3,1531263,619 (3.93)60
The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. In this "vital, necessary, and beautiful book" (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and "allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to 'bad people' (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.… (més)
Membre:RedSonja76
Títol:White Fragility : Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism
Autors:Robin J. DiAngelo
Informació:Random House Digital Dist, 2018.
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:*****
Etiquetes:Cap

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White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism de Robin DiAngelo (2018)

Afegit fa poc perKhalidV, shazzydub, nsp01, pearcare, Keyaw, biblioteca privada, marcusg231, Nerdyrev1, tabithahill
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Whitey starts to get nervous when you write books like this Robin! 😜

Although the reason I support the “identity politics” of suppressed groups, as such (although not the harmful relativism of Confederate identity politics: if nik—if blacks are humans, why aren’t white men gods? We could be gods of drinking and fishing!), is that I think that “identity politics” is something more than politics; it’s at least more sociological practice than politicking in the C-SPAN sense of the word, you know. (Will the Congressman from Pennsylvania please tie his shoelaces please!) And really I think it’s something more, really. (You were born so you could have interesting thoughts, children! No need, no cause for anything else! Now! Let’s go eat some corn-fed beef!) I’m not sure she gets this, though…. Although the thing about ‘politics’, to use the term broadly, is that people who are at least half right tend to be somewhat more tolerant, even if they have much more to complain about for their party, while the nervous people without a moral leg to stand are loudly and rambunctiously proclaim, But thank God for white people, right! It’s either us or the commie heirs of Judas! And if that ain’t straight-shooting, I ain’t a fly-fisher…. Although some people who carefully buy houses where there are no Black people are probably very northern and even bureaucratic and kinda, I don’t know…. I mean, you could almost just read the reviews of half the educated crackers who claim to have read the book, which theoretically excludes all the people who saw it and either spit at it or thought, But isn’t it only about Mom and Dad? So really the book could be called, It’s All About Me: The Sequel (Be White series). Right? I don’t know. But that’s kinda how it is.

I like the line about whiteness being the “changing same”. Although I don’t think that all forms of whiteness to be equally pernicious or that no form of Anglo education has any merit—obviously that’s not true—but there is this Huge, Pernicious aspect of white supremacy where we look at the white person we don’t like, change something superficial to benefit ourselves, and call that the sci-fi future, while continuing to exclude the, er, the blackpeople, and to loudly proclaim that we are not white and therefore ‘black-people’ have nothing to complain about, can they stop forgetting that we’re proper and not bad like them?, you know, because after all, It’s All About Me—it’s all about ‘all of us’, except for, you know.

…. Of course, the general thrust of these ideas seems simple and familiar enough to me, but perhaps that only makes it more strange. (Because the person who’s REALLY wrong thinks they REALLY understand, like in religion.) But do I blame people, and make them think that I must not understand, because —they can’t be racists, because there’s something good about them, because I don’t get because I blame them? Or do I make excuses for people, —You’re a good person because you think you’re good, so you can’t be a racist (or at least, it’s not important), because of how good you are?…. As much as there is more to practice than knowledge, this is certainly a subject worthy of study, just as much as one that affects “everyone” (ie white people, lol).

…. “Today we have a cultural norm that insists we hide our racism from people of color and deny it among ourselves, but not that we actually challenge it. In fact, we are socially penalized for challenging racism.”

…. Nobody cares what I write here so I write what I think is true, but if I told my father, or even my mother, much of what I think, it would be like…. I wouldn’t be welcome anymore, and especially with dad. Mom would just blame my opinions on somebody else. My step-mom would get rabid-dog on me, though. “When CEO Jesus comes back, he’s gonna wonder why we let the damn black people alone and didn’t pay back your son for being on Their Side.” “Woman, listen to me: we gotta be polite, or white men don’t look good. Do you want white men to look good, or not? You know you never listen to me! Now! Let’s try to say that in a more polite way. When CEO Jesus comes back, he’s gonna wonder why we didn’t pay back the criminals who happened to come from foreign black parts.” “I just think we should be calling them (censored)’s!” “(throws down newspaper) That’s not right; I’m enlightened! I’m on everybody’s side! I’m white; I’m a man; I’m whole! I’m everybody! White men, do things right, before Judgment comes on all of us!”

But in ‘real life’, I don’t break ranks with white people. People don’t expect me to have agency, you know.

And the other thing that I’m starting to realize is that there are white people, and especially white men, who benefit from the country expecting the elite to be white people, and especially men, and who get to where they are largely because the country expects white men to supply the successful people, and who capitalize on the incredible pit of greed we’re digging ourselves into, and not on the almost mythical sensitive intelligent enlightened harming-none white genius, you know. Of course, there is the odd person who does something worthwhile with their opportunities and privileges, but many of the white elite are just as idiotic and greedy I think as the people who fork their money over to them—you just don’t have to share Thanksgiving dinner with CEO Charles Bigote, the way you have to look at your lucky-but-not-successful father, who thinks that he’s the king of the world because he’s a white man who knows how to raise his voice. The elite is often just a white man who knows how to lie, you know. He usually doesn’t brag so much about being a moral basket case, but most of the differences are much more superficial than they appear.

…. It’s easy to assume, you know. It’s easy to declare ourselves based on either little or no experience, or even a certain amount of knowledge, to know what we need to know or to be beyond a certain source. (And I’ve never liked the whole specialist’s dismissal, you know. “Oh, I’ve already studied Greece. John and Cindy taught me zero.”) But although it’s easy for both the conservative and the liberal to be dismissive, either because they’re “good” and there’s nothing to learn, or, they “know” and they’re better than this, well…. Two people went up to the temple to pray, and one of them only went back justified, and it wasn’t the one you’d expect. Robin is leery of calling the whole thing a “moral” issue, because of how we abuse the concept, but I do think we need morality, it’s just that it’s harmful to assume that we understand morality already. Sometimes our abuse of the concept of morality is an outstanding moral issue, you know.

…. —“Break with the apathy of whiteness”
—Admit that I can make mistakes.

Of course, I do have problems with the idea of Fighting racism, being Anti-racist, not that she talks about fighting exactly, but she has stuff about breaking white solidarity, and I do feel a certain amount of obligation to my racist white family and my racist white society, even if I also feel honor-bound to criticize or stand apart from them as well. But I’m sure I could be found to not really be ‘breaking ranks’, you know. For me it has a lot to do with my past, and my patterns, where I easily isolate from others and have great difficulty making any sort of connection, even with similar people in privileged encounters, if you will, and also in the past I was a chauvie red; I kinda played the fool by trying to act like I was everyone’s friend and also always by playing everyone false—so now I feel like I have an obligation towards everyone, since I served everyone so ill before, so certainly Blacks and even women, but also old white men who are good at chess and feel strangely paranoid, you know.

But at least I can freely and I think honestly say that I understand at least Some of my own weaknesses, my own foibles, weaknesses and fallibilities, and some of the consequences and problems attendant on my attitudes. And certainly my life and my choices are just my life and choices, not the choices of some perfect or un-embodied Objective Being, you know, just because I’m white, and also a drake. (A gander.) So someone else, with another set of circumstances, with really no reason to agree with me, might not agree with me, and is I suppose at least partially right, you know. I mean, I don’t know.

🤷
  goosecap | Oct 27, 2022 |
Livro muito bom para começar a entender um pouco dos problemas do racismo, aqui referido de forma ampla.

De fato, o título original (Fragilidade branca: porque é tão difícil para pessoas brancas falarem sobre racismo?) é muito mais coerente com a proposta da autora que é falar sobre o tema, da perspectiva de uma pessoa de pele branca que fala para outras, como deixa claro no início.

Concordando-se ou não com o conteúdo ou parte dele, há muito no livro para aprender e refletir sobre o tema. ( )
  andersonpereira | Oct 13, 2022 |
I recommend this book because it offers a new understanding of the society we live in, race, racism and how the problem white people have with talking about racism actually perpetuates and helps keep racism alive. Especially recommended for whites who believe they are not racist. Or non-whites seeking to understand white thinking on racism. A bit repetitive and not "fun" to read due to some poor writing/organization but still very worth reading. I hope the ideas presented here are further studied and reported on. ( )
  jemmatcf | Jul 26, 2022 |
Because I already had an in-depth understanding of racism and white fragility prior to reading this book; I did not find it as revolutionary as the world seemed to at the time. It did not at all live up to it's hype, in my opinion; it was dry, repetitive, and frankly, I did not learn anything new from it. Just not my cup of tea. ( )
  jlpoulin | Jun 15, 2022 |
Does a great job addressed a tough topic. Understanding the background of racism and how deep it is engrained in our culture is beneficial for people of any race to learn. As a white person, learning about our white fragility and why we become so defensive or confrontationial about race is eye opening and will hopefully help me become more aware of my bias in life. The more we can become aware, the better opportunity to recognize and break harmful patterns that have been existent in American infrastructure since the beginning ( )
  Crystal199 | May 20, 2022 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 123 (següent | mostra-les totes)
CHOTINER: So you consider yourself a racist right now?

DiANGELO: Yes. I will always have a racist worldview and biases. The way I look at it is I’m really clear that I do less harm than I used to. I perpetrate that racism less often. I’m not defensive at all when I realize—whether myself or it’s been brought to my attention—that I’ve just perpetrated a piece of it. I have really good repair skills. None of those are small things because they mean I do less harm.
afegit per elenchus | editaSlate.com, Isaac Chotiner (Aug 2, 2018)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (6 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Robin DiAngeloautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Dyson, Michael EricPròlegautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Landon, AmyNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Roe, LouisAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Tatusian, AlexDissenyadorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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These ceremonials in honor of white supremacy, performed from babyhood, slip from the conscious mind down deep into muscles . . . and become difficult to tear out. - Lillian Smith, Killers of the Dream (1949)
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I am a white American raised in the United States. I have a white frame of reference and a white worldview, and I move through the world with a white experience. My experience is not a universal human experience.
[Foreword] One metaphor for race, and racism, won't do.
[Author's Note] The United States was founded on the principle that all people are created equal.
I am a white woman.
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The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. In this "vital, necessary, and beautiful book" (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and "allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to 'bad people' (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

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