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Midnight's Children (1981)

de Salman Rushdie

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses / Mencions
12,072219373 (4.05)1 / 927
In India, one thousand and one children are born in the hour following the midnight commemorating the country's independence from British rule. And of those children, none is more entwined with the destiny of that land thatn Saleem Sinai, he of dubious birth and a nose of astounding proportion. Discovering a psychic connection with midnight's other thousand, Saleem recounts a life both reflecting and recreating the modern history of his oft-troubled homeland.… (més)
  1. 130
    Cien años de soledad de Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Nickelini)
  2. 71
    El déu de les coses petites de Arundhati Roy (GoST)
  3. 61
    El Timbal de llauna de Günter Grass (GabrielF, CGlanovsky)
    GabrielF: I think Rushdie based a lot of his style in Midnight's Children on The Tin Drum. Both books are historical epics told through the perspective of a child with strange powers.
    CGlanovsky: A boy bound to the destiny of his birthplace. Surreal elements.
  4. 41
    The Satanic Verses de Salman Rushdie (BGP)
  5. 20
    Train to Pakistan de Khushwant Singh (pamelad)
    pamelad: Also set during Partition.
  6. 10
    Kim de Rudyard Kipling (Gregorio_Roth)
    Gregorio_Roth: The book is a modern interpretation of KIM in a number of ways. I think it will complete your point of view on Imperialism and India.
  7. 21
    El mestre i Margarida de Mikhail Bulgakov (BGP)
  8. 11
    The Moor's Last Sigh de Salman Rushdie (wrmjr66)
    wrmjr66: I think The Moor's Last Sigh is Rushdie's best book since Midnight's Children.
  9. 01
    Island of a Thousand Mirrors: A Novel de Nayomi Munaweera (evilmoose)
  10. 03
    La casa de los espíritus de Isabel Allende (amyblue)
1980s (17)
Asia (18)
hopes (11)
1960s (219)
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Anglès (205)  Francès (3)  Neerlandès (2)  Castellà (2)  Txec (1)  Danès (1)  Hebreu (1)  Suec (1)  Finès (1)  Polonès (1)  Totes les llengües (218)
Es mostren 1-5 de 218 (següent | mostra-les totes)
When I started the book, I almost immediately thought "Oh, it's Tristram Shandy in 20th-century India," and then I remembered what a labor Sterne's book had been to get through. Still, I read the first 100 or so pages of Midnight's Children with delight. Nearly 600 pages of it proved a bit much for me, though, and though I was glad to read more about the history, and though any given shorter stretch of the book was pleasant to read, the whole big thing was a bit of a labor for me. It's a good, important book, but the return on investment for me wasn't as big as I like for a book of this size. ( )
  dllh | Jan 6, 2021 |
What a masterpiece! I don't understand everything and the narrator is very unreliable (interesting he keeps reminding us of this) but still, this is brilliant. Rushdie weaves the history of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh into this tale of magical realism, which manages at the same time to explore loaded themes of greatness, identity, and ambition. Rushdie also writes in a way that makes you turn the pages; his writing is so whirlwind it just sucks you in. I love his titling of each chapter; the titling is succinct and perfectly describes the core of the chapter. Nevertheless, this is definitely not an easy read but it pays to persevere. ( )
  siok | Jan 3, 2021 |
Rushdie is the first of the Booker winners that I knew anything about before beginning this project. Nonetheless, I had a difficult, scratch that, complicated experience reading this book. So, since others have written far more intelligently about its plot and meaning, I’ll just tell you what it was like for me.

To be honest, I was reluctant to start “yet another” book about India. That’s why I wrote the blog post titled “Interlude”: pure procrastination.

The narrator, Saleem Sinai, has a putative audience of one, his companion Padma. He begins by introducing his grandparents, and several of the motifs that will recur and weave this loose tapestry together. Saleem himself is not even born until well past the hundred-page mark. And it took me over two hundred pages to get really interested in the book. The style is that of a sauntering saga, an unrushed meandering through several generations, and it drove me nuts -- until I decided to just lie back and let go. Since that didn’t happen until about page 300 of 500, I wasted a lot of time resisting this book.

It is repetitive, and verbose, and grandiose. Rushdie has a way of stringing together three words when one would do. Is he too lazy to choose? Or showing off his vocabulary? But, when I finally surrendered, the repetition-with-a-difference became lulling, like lying on a beach listening to waves: almost the same, but different each time, building imperceptibly to crescendos, then dying down again, weaving a texture of symbols and sounds. I was pulled along with the tide of the story, and learned a lot about India and Pakistan in the process.

I also learned that some books just can’t be rushed through. ( )
  stephkaye | Dec 14, 2020 |
Gabriel Garcia Marquez Charles Dickens history India = Midnight's Children

Fantasical family history and scores of events with long winded sentences paralleled to India's history of Independence set in India produces this long rambling sometimes magical, dry humour, bodily story about a unattractive very flawed character. Pickles and cucumbers, snakes, chutney, flowers, scents, family, women, all motifs flowing in and out of the story. It took me forever to read. Nothing was fully boring or unappealing, but not having any knowledge of India, its history, its geography or terminology made it difficult for this story to find root in my mind. However, I stuck with it and I can now say I've read it. Reasonably enjoyed it, at least intermittently. Also happy I'm finished it. ( )
  LDVoorberg | Nov 22, 2020 |
Here is another I read while in graduate school. I recall it was one of the best books I read, but it was also a heavy book, with a lot to consider and study. I was interested back then in looking at the magic realist elements. I was rushing to read it, since I had other books and assignments. The paper turned out ok, but not the best I have written. I basically wished I had more time to give this book its due. This is definitely one I will have to reread at leisure someday. It is probably Rushdie's best. ( )
  bloodravenlib | Aug 17, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 218 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Midnight's Children is a teeming fable of postcolonial India, told in magical-realist fashion by a telepathic hero born at the stroke of midnight on the day the country became independent. First published in 1981, it was met with little immediate excitement.
afegit per mikeg2 | editaThe Guardian, Lindesay Irvine (Jul 10, 2008)
 
"The literary map of India is about to be redrawn. . . . What [English-language fiction about India] has been missing is . . . something just a little coarse, a hunger to swallow India whole and spit it out. . . . Now, in 'Midnight's Children,' Salman Rushdie has realized that ambition."
afegit per GYKM | editaNew York Times, Clarke Blaise (Apr 19, 1981)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (51 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Rushdie, Salmanautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Capriolo, EttoreTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Davidson, AndrewAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Howard, IanAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Schuchart, MaxTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Versluys, MarijkeEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
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Títol original
Títols alternatius
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Epígraf
Dedicatòria
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For Zafar Rushdie
who, contrary to all expectations,
was born in the afternoon.
Primeres paraules
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I was born in the city of Bombay . . . once upon a time.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
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(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
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Please distinguish among:

-- Salman Rushdie's original 1981 novel, Midnight's Children;

-- Rushdie's 1999 screenplay adaptation (with introduction) of the novel, having the same title; and

-- The 2003 stage play, Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children, adapted for theater by Rushdie, Tim Supple and Simon Reade.

Thank you.
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
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CDD/SMD canònics
In India, one thousand and one children are born in the hour following the midnight commemorating the country's independence from British rule. And of those children, none is more entwined with the destiny of that land thatn Saleem Sinai, he of dubious birth and a nose of astounding proportion. Discovering a psychic connection with midnight's other thousand, Saleem recounts a life both reflecting and recreating the modern history of his oft-troubled homeland.

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Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

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Valoració

Mitjana: (4.05)
0.5 9
1 42
1.5 11
2 119
2.5 38
3 323
3.5 115
4 735
4.5 150
5 917

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