IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Twilight of the Idols, and The Anti-Christ
S'està carregant…

Twilight of the Idols, and The Anti-Christ (1888 original; edició 1968)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,82897,244 (4)19
In these two devastating late works, Nietzsche offers a powerful attack on the morality and the beliefs of his time Nietzsche's Twilight of the Idols is a 'grand declaration of war' on reason, psychology and theology, which combines highly charged personal attacks on his contemporaries (in particular Hegel, Kant and Schopenhauer) with a lightning tour of his own philosophy. It also paves the way for The Anti-Christ, Nietzsche's final assault on institutional Christianity, in which he identifies himself with the 'Dionysian' artist and confronts Christ: the only opponent he feels worthy of him. Translated by R. J. Hollingdale with an Introduction by Michael Tanner… (més)
Membre:GrahamGreene
Títol:Twilight of the Idols, and The Anti-Christ
Autors:
Informació:Harmondsworth England, Penguin (1968). (1968), Unknown Binding
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

Twilight of the Idols / The Anti-Christ de Friedrich Nietzsche (Author) (1888)

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 19 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Friedrich Nietzsche wrote a number of enduring works, with Twilight of the Idols and The Anti-Christ being his last before he went insane. Now this book is the Penguin Classics version of these two works and was printed in 2003 with a new further reading section. R.J. Hollingdale provides the translation and there is an introduction by Michael Tanner. As the book says, the introduction provides historical context for his statements and ideas.

Nietzsche is pretty famous so I don’t remember when I first heard of him, though it might have been when I was in school or something. Nietzsche’s philosophy and ideas give off a sort of atmosphere that draws you into them. As a person that doubts the existence of a super-being or entity that has a personal stake in our lives, I can relate to Nietzsche pretty well. That isn’t to say that the work is perfect, however. I suppose my biggest issue with the work is how it is organized. I guess I don’t understand why it jumps around as it does. Maybe I’m wrong, perhaps there is no jumping around and the work is really cohesive and smooth in what it talks about. I would have to read it again to check though.

The book opens with Twilight of the Idols. It has a foreword to the work, goes into a number of maxims and aphorisms, and then there is “The Problem of Socrates.” Each chapter is really short and is only around a paragraph in length. If I remember correctly though, I don’t think this is the only work by Nietzsche that does this. Although I suppose with the way it is put forward, it does make it easy to reference a particular paragraph or small amount of text, so maybe that is why he did that. The major theme of Twilight of the Idols fits with most of Nietzsche’s works in that the idea of God is unnecessary and treats humanity as infantile, scraping, and toadying. We are never worthy to even gaze upon the glory that is “God.” Nietzsche argues that humanity is better than that and is mainly disgusted with the idea of Christianity and any other dogmatic system that forces one to go against their nature. Nietzsche piles on the vitriol and disregards the words of his critics. He also has a bad habit of trailing off his sentences with ellipses, though I think he might be making a point.

It continues with The Anti-Christ. As I mentioned, I believe this was his last completed work before he was institutionalized. There is so much quotable material packed into this slim volume. It sums up his ideas quite succinctly. The one I especially recognized was the second paragraph. I think a portion of it was quoted in one of the Civilization Games. All in all, I think Nietzsche was courageous in holding to his ideals and whatnot, especially when it went against the Status Quo. ( )
  Floyd3345 | Jun 15, 2019 |
The rating goes for The Anti-Christ, since I skipped Twilight of the Idols.
( )
  AlexandraWD | May 24, 2016 |
Twilight of the Idols: Nietzsche takes on many of the idols of modern life, and reduces them to pulp in an effort at revaluation of all values. Written lucidly and clearly, Nietzsche brings to philosophy a voice that can be taken seriously, not the least because it can be understood. ( )
1 vota Devil_llama | Aug 27, 2014 |
“Twilight of the Idols” and “The Anti-Christ” are two of the last books, both composed in 1888, that Nietzsche wrote before his final descent into syphilis-induced madness which occurred during the first week of 1889. It continues themes he had developed in his earlier work, and “The Anti-Christ” especially approaches Christianity with a particularly ferocious and critical eye.

As anyone who has thumbed through a volume of Nietzsche can tell you, his work isn’t composed of clear, well-defined propositions to be ultimately accepted or rejected; instead, his arguments have a kind of ravishing rhetorical force to them. His writing is less apothegmatic here than in other work, but is still never syllogistic or ratiocinated in such a way that we usually associate with philosophy. This isn’t a mistake; he intended his work to speak as much if not more through the force of style than anything else. In his “attack” on Socrates in the first book, he calls reason itself a “tyrant,” and wonders if Socrates enjoys his “own form of ferocity in the knife-thrust of the syllogism.”

The greatest part of “Twilight of the Idols” is the chapter called “Morality as Anti-Nature” in which he says that all moral systems up until now, and particularly Christianity, are wrong precisely because they try to deform and reshape human nature to their own image. For Nietzsche, the moral is the natural, but Christianity – and this is really an attack on all religious systems, though some more than others – stops being moral when it tries to impose concepts that are
completely foreign to human beings like the idea that “everyone is created the same” or a selfless Christian charity. Whether or not you agree with the thrust of the argument, I found the idea of moral systems as rational attempts to remold nature an interesting one. Of course, people jump on these passages to try to make him look like some kind of nihilist or immoralist, when nothing could be further from the truth. He simply wants the principles and drives of human nature to inform ethical systems, not something foreign to them. Freud may have picked up on this, admitting as he did a great debt to Nietzsche. “The Anti-Christ” goes on to attack what I would call religious psychology, and especially the moral precepts of Christianity.

If you haven’t read Nietzsche and have some sort of caricature of what he says in your head, start with this book, probably one of his most readable, which is ironic when considered in the light of his mental breakdown immediately thereafter. His attacks are never the ones you hear from atheists these days, “that the idea of God is irrational” or “we have no scientific evidence for such a being.” His criticisms are fresh and invigorating, including accusations that the apostle Paul distorted Christ’s message beyond measure and that Christianity focuses on another world essentially devaluing this one. Again, this isn’t about agreement or disagreement with his basic assertions. (Some of the people on whom he had the biggest influence fundamentally disagreed with what he said.) It’s the punch that he packs while delivering them. There was a reason why he subtitled the book “Wie man mit dem Hammer philosophiert” (“How to Philosophize with a Hammer”).

Other than Nietzsche’s writing itself, some of the most impressive things about him are the downright preposterousness of the criticisms that people levy against him, the sheer width and breadth of intellectual laziness with which people read him. Just from reading a small sampling of the reviews posted on this book alone, there are accusations of him “deriding self-control” and being “obnoxiously right-wing,” the first a willful misreading, the second a risible attempt to foist a set of anachronistic political opinions on the ideas of a man who was hugely contemptuous of the German politics of his own day, left and right alike. Those who are trying to discover their token protofascist in Nietzsche would do better to look elsewhere, especially at his contemporaries Paul de Lagarde, Julius Langbehn, and Arthur Moeller van den Bruck, all of whose ideas make Nietzsche’s supposed illiberalism look like mere child’s play (for details, see either Fritz Stern’s marvelous “The Politics of Cultural Despair” or my review of it posted on this site). That Nietzsche still serves as a lodestar around which people feel free to hang their own various political opinions can only be a testament to his continued cultural importance. ( )
3 vota kant1066 | Jun 7, 2012 |
These two books, two of Nietzsche's last books, are simultaneously one of the greatest challenges ever launched against Christianity (after that of Dostoyevsky in The Brother's Karamazov) and are the greatest challenge to modern atheists. No matter which side of the debate you belong to -- or if you are a third party altogether -- Nietzsche has something to rock your world. I first read these books as a teenager and they forever changed the way that I view the world. The question that everyone who reads these books, and the rest of Nietzsche's work, must ask themselves is what to make of the modern world. As we enter a supposedly post-Christian era, an era of which Nietzsche was certainly the forerunner and prophet, we must ask ourselves just how much of our heritage we are willing to part with as we part with Christianity. And we must ask ourselves upon what basis we will build this new, post-Christian civilization. My belief is that Nietzsche was right: the foundation will be power. ( )
1 vota davidpwithun | Sep 16, 2011 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

» Afegeix-hi altres autors

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Nietzsche, FriedrichAutorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Hollingdale, R. J.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hollingdale, R. J.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Tanner, MichaelIntroduccióautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Out of life's school of war: What does not destroy me, makes me stronger.
What does not kill me, makes me stronger.
From the military school of life: Whatever does not kill me makes me stronger.
Is man merely a mistake of God's? Or God merely a mistake of man's?
Plato is boring.
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (4)

In these two devastating late works, Nietzsche offers a powerful attack on the morality and the beliefs of his time Nietzsche's Twilight of the Idols is a 'grand declaration of war' on reason, psychology and theology, which combines highly charged personal attacks on his contemporaries (in particular Hegel, Kant and Schopenhauer) with a lightning tour of his own philosophy. It also paves the way for The Anti-Christ, Nietzsche's final assault on institutional Christianity, in which he identifies himself with the 'Dionysian' artist and confronts Christ: the only opponent he feels worthy of him. Translated by R. J. Hollingdale with an Introduction by Michael Tanner

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Biblioteca llegada: Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Nietzsche té una Biblioteca llegada. Les Biblioteques llegades són biblioteques personals de lectors famosos, introduïdes per membres de LibraryThing del grup Legacy Libraries.

Mira el perfil llegat de Friedrich Nietzsche.

Pàgina d'autor de Friedrich Nietzsche.

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 8
2.5
3 39
3.5 11
4 67
4.5 12
5 61

Penguin Australia

Una edició d'aquest llibre ha estat publicada per Penguin Australia.

» Pàgina d'informació de l'editor

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 166,252,402 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible