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Friday Black de Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah
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Friday Black (edició 2018)

de Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
5453833,918 (3.92)91
"An excitement and a wonder: strange, crazed, urgent and funny...The wildly talented Adjei-Brenyah has made these edgy tales immensely charming, via his resolute, heartful, immensely likeable narrators, capable of seeing the world as blessed and cursed at once." -- George Saunders "This book is dark and captivating and essential...A call to arms and a condemnation. Adjei-Brenyah offers powerful prose as parable. The writing in this outstanding collection will make you hurt and demand your hope. Read this book." -- Roxane Gay A piercingly raw debut story collection from a young writer with an explosive voice; a treacherously surreal, and, at times, heartbreakingly satirical look at what it's like to be young and black in America. From the start of this extraordinary debut, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah's writing will grab you, haunt you, enrage and invigorate you. By placing ordinary characters in extraordinary situations, Adjei-Brenyah reveals the violence, injustice, and painful absurdities that black men and women contend with every day in this country. These stories tackle urgent instances of racism and cultural unrest, and explore the many ways we fight for humanity in an unforgiving world. In "The Finkelstein Five," Adjei-Brenyah gives us an unforgettable reckoning of the brutal prejudice of our justice system. In "Zimmer Land," we see a far-too-easy-to-believe imagining of racism as sport. And "Friday Black" and "How to Sell a Jacket as Told by Ice King" show the horrors of consumerism and the toll it takes on us all. Entirely fresh in its style and perspective, and sure to appeal to fans of Colson Whitehead, Marlon James, and George Saunders, Friday Black confronts readers with a complicated, insistent, wrenching chorus of emotions, the final note of which, remarkably, is hope.… (més)
Membre:werdupb
Títol:Friday Black
Autors:Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah (Autor)
Informació:Mariner Books (2018), Edition: First Edition, 208 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Friday Black de Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

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» Mira també 91 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 38 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Summer 2021 (July);

I started a grand quest through a large assortment of poetry & short story collections recommended from my APSI (AP Summer Institute) for AP Literature, and this is one of the many as you will see.

The first of the short story collections, this one was recommended on specifically teaching "Friday Black" for which this collection is named. The magical realist twist on the Black Friday holiday and what magically realistic monsters of those hunting the sales on that day definitely rocketed high into something I'd love to toss into a Magical Realism unit, but I was entirely moved by all the pieces in the collection at all. ( )
  wanderlustlover | Aug 21, 2021 |
I'm not much of a story story reader, but some of the reviews of this book got me interested. Several of the stories were excellent. I especially liked the ones dealing with racism, such as The Finkelstein 5 about a white father killing five black teenagers with a chainsaw, whom he decided were a threat to his two children and the retribution by some members of the black community, and Zimmerland, about an amusement park where patrons could release their anger on park employees. I did not really care for the ones focused on consumerism, such as Friday Black about the lunacy around Black Friday bargain shopping maniacs and How to Sell a Jacketnor The Hospital Where although I liked the quirky Lark Street better than other reviewers did. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah is definitely going places, and his writing is jaw-droppingly good. As a former Albany resident myself (the author is a SUNY Albany alum), I was tickled to find a story titled Lark Street in the collection (although "tickled" is an admittedly strange choice of a word, and not at all how I felt by the end) and to recognize bits and pieces of my beloved longtime hometown in it and other stories. Friday Black is pitch dark in its surreal visions, though, and those visions are close enough to real to be deeply disturbing, as they should be. My mental health in these fraught times is too tenuous to withstand the onslaught, so instead of continuing to avoid reading it, I must regretfully put this one aside for now. ( )
  CaitlinMcC | Jul 11, 2021 |
I wrote a long review but Goodreads deleted it. This book was really good

Edit: alright let's try this again...

There are some really standout stories in this book. "The Finklestein 5" is the best. "Zimmer Land," "Lark Street," and the title story also stand out (especially for this retail employee as we approach the holidays).

The less successful stories are those in which the sci-fi conceit overwhelms the storytelling ("The Era," "Through the Flash").

But the good heavily outweighs the bad. And the bad is not half-baked but over baked, evidence of an active, probing mind, rather than a lazy one.

Most of the press for this book focused on the genre elements: the horror, the futurism, the satire. So it surprised me when these stories were--each and every one--your standard, MFA approved, realist drama about characters' moral dilemmas. This is what makes them good. A lot of this kind of fiction is bad because its realism is a bourgeois, narrowly psychological realism. It uses its ideology and the familiarity of realist fiction to resist exploring difficult questions. These stories are much more capacious--voracious even--in their intake of the problems of the world as it actually is. These stories breathe the same air I do, inhaling the casual violence and alienation of our world while refusing to use realism as a bulwark against moral exploration. Race and class and the million ways we categorize each other are as real here as a hand on your cheek. This is the good kind of realism.
  trotta | Mar 4, 2021 |
I really wanted to like this one, but I found much of the prose just plain prosaic, the stories generally meh, and the effort on the whole disappointing. The book starts with just oddly off-key language choices that felt sloppy rather than intentional, and several of the stories feel like Saunders (who seems to be affiliated with the author) sort of halfway warmed over. Much of the subject matter here is important, but the author's treatment of it just didn't do the matter justice. I may have just missed something here, as the book seems to be beloved here on Goodreads and by respected authors alike. ( )
  dllh | Jan 6, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 38 (següent | mostra-les totes)
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"An excitement and a wonder: strange, crazed, urgent and funny...The wildly talented Adjei-Brenyah has made these edgy tales immensely charming, via his resolute, heartful, immensely likeable narrators, capable of seeing the world as blessed and cursed at once." -- George Saunders "This book is dark and captivating and essential...A call to arms and a condemnation. Adjei-Brenyah offers powerful prose as parable. The writing in this outstanding collection will make you hurt and demand your hope. Read this book." -- Roxane Gay A piercingly raw debut story collection from a young writer with an explosive voice; a treacherously surreal, and, at times, heartbreakingly satirical look at what it's like to be young and black in America. From the start of this extraordinary debut, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah's writing will grab you, haunt you, enrage and invigorate you. By placing ordinary characters in extraordinary situations, Adjei-Brenyah reveals the violence, injustice, and painful absurdities that black men and women contend with every day in this country. These stories tackle urgent instances of racism and cultural unrest, and explore the many ways we fight for humanity in an unforgiving world. In "The Finkelstein Five," Adjei-Brenyah gives us an unforgettable reckoning of the brutal prejudice of our justice system. In "Zimmer Land," we see a far-too-easy-to-believe imagining of racism as sport. And "Friday Black" and "How to Sell a Jacket as Told by Ice King" show the horrors of consumerism and the toll it takes on us all. Entirely fresh in its style and perspective, and sure to appeal to fans of Colson Whitehead, Marlon James, and George Saunders, Friday Black confronts readers with a complicated, insistent, wrenching chorus of emotions, the final note of which, remarkably, is hope.

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Descripció del llibre
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Cobertes populars

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Gèneres

Melvil Decimal System (DDC)

813.6 — Literature American and Canadian American fiction 21st Century

LCC (Classificació de la Biblioteca del Congrés dels EUA)

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.92)
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