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The Salt Path

de Raynor Winn

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
7464423,278 (3.94)62
"Just days after Raynor Winn learns that Moth, her husband of thirty-two years, is terminally ill, their house and farm are taken away, along with their livelihood. With nothing left and little time, they make the brave and impulsive decision to walk the 630 miles of the sea-swept South West Coast Path, from Somerset to Dorset, through Devon and Cornwall. Carrying only the essentials for survival on their backs, they live wild in the ancient, weathered landscape of cliffs, sea, and sky. Yet through every step, every encounter, and every test along the way, their walk becomes a remarkable and life-affirming journey. Powerfully written and unflinchingly honest, The Salt Path is ultimately a portrayal of home--how it can be lost, rebuilt, and rediscovered in the most unexpected ways"--… (més)
Afegit fa poc perRennie90, kjthundercat, CaroG, jenniferw88, biblioteca privada, Evelien, t_c_s
  1. 00
    Walking Away de Simon Armitage (Stbalbach)
    Stbalbach: Simon Armitage's memoir about his walk of the SWC Path, done at the same time the Winns and Armitage crossed paths
  2. 00
    Falling for Icarus: A Journey among the Cretans de Rory MacLean (marieke54)
  3. 00
    Unsheltered de Barbara Kingsolver (JenMDB)
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Es mostren 1-5 de 44 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Such an amazing book. The hiker-girl-in-personal-crisis had its day with Cheryl Strayed, Raynor Winn takes it to a new level. There's a lot going on. A colorful and eventful travel book of South West England (Cornwall, Devon) told through the lens of homeless people, exposing a hypocritical soft underbelly of English culture. The English right to roam laws are revolutionary and one can only marvel at the possibilities if enacted in other countries. It has a Tolkien quality of little people on a great adventure (the only book they bring is Beowulf). There is incredible nature writing and writing in general. At it's core is a grand love story, a lasting memorial to the authors husband. As life is frozen in rock along the Jurassic Coast, so too will their story be set for the ages. ( )
  Stbalbach | Oct 22, 2021 |
Every once and awhile a book comes along that reaches out and speaks to all your senses, and The Salt Path by Raynor Winn was such a book for me. This is an uplifting memoir of a couple, Raynor and Moth Winn, who lose their house and livelihood through a bad investment. The day after losing their court battle, a doctor advises them that Moth had an incurable degenerative brain disease. Homeless and uncertain about their future or how to proceed with life, they walk. They choose to walk the 630 mile long South West Coast Path which follows the coastline of Somerset, North and South Devon, Cornwall and Dorset.

This would be a huge undertaking for anyone but for this couple, their age, financial situation and Moth’s disabilities made this an almost impossible undertaking. The author isn’t looking for pity and she doesn’t sugar-coat the situation but describes all the ups and downs they encounter along the way. This was a difficult undertaking yet somehow this trek with it’s views, wildlife, and freedom allowed them to accept and come to terms with their situation. Even having to cut their trip short due to winter setting in didn’t stop them, they returned the next summer and completed their journey.

The Salt Path was a powerful life-affirming story that the author tells in a realistic, humorous manner. As I followed the story I was googling the villages and beaches that were mentioned and I was amazed at the scenery, but this was so much more than a travel story. This couple totally won my heart with their affection and care for each other as well as the author’s honest and beautiful writing. ( )
  DeltaQueen50 | Oct 19, 2021 |
What a story! It's hard to say much without giving things away. My emotions ran through disbelief, sadness, amazement and disbelief again. By the end of the book I felt totally inspired and full of hope. There is a sequel which I can't wait to read. I need to know what happened to Raynor and her husband Moth. My fingers are crossed for them. ( )
  Fliss88 | Oct 15, 2021 |
For as long as I can remember, I’ve been a big fan of books written by people who test themselves by long, cross-country trips. It doesn’t matter whether they are walking, riding bicycles or motorbikes, boating, or even driving, I’ve always envied the authors. But now something a little different has come along: Raynor Winn has written a long-walk kind of memoir with a twist. The Salt Path is about the 630-mile walk along part of England’s southern coast that Raynor and her husband “Moth” took on only because they suddenly found themselves homeless and jobless. Needless to say, this time around I don’t envy the author one little bit.

It could perhaps be argued that Raynor and Moth brought their problems upon themselves, but the only thing they were really guilty of was being a little too naive and trusting when it came to doing business with a man Moth had known since childhood. When that man’s business failed, he wasted little time coming after the couple’s home and business to compensate himself for their supposed share of the failed company’s debts and obligations. Raynor and Moth tried to defend themselves in court, but not being able to afford a competent attorney turned out to be their downfall- and at the end, they were left with only a few days to vacate the property. Everything they owned, and life as they knew it, was gone.

Well, it could just not get much worse than that, could it? The short answer is “yes, it could,” and it does exactly that when within a matter of days of losing their home and everything they own, Moth is diagnosed with an illness likely to claim his life within five years. So, with no place to go, and no money other than the minimal benefits they are eligible for each month, Raynor and Moth begin walking westward along England’s southern coast even though they have no idea what they will do once they come to the end of the trail months later.

The Salt Path is Winn’s account of what it was like for two people in their fifties to strap rather heavy packs onto their backs and trudge along during daylight hours without having any idea where they will be pitching their tent at the end of the day. Along the way, the pair endures the heat of the day, cold and wet nights that make it near impossible to sleep, the constant problem of finding enough water to keep themselves safely hydrated, and living on whatever meager diet they can afford. And if that is not already bad enough, they have to live with the societal stigma of being homeless when people they encounter along the way more times than not treat them as if they are carrying the plague simply because they are homeless. It is almost as if homelessness is a contagious disease.

Bottom Line: Sad as The Salt Path is, for this reader the saddest part of all is the way that their fellow citizens treat Ray and Moth as soon as they learn that the couple are not voluntary hikers/campers out on some lark. This is particularly disappointing when the penny drops in the middle of a conversation and Ray and Moth’s new “friends” abruptly excuse themselves and leave the area as quickly as their feet can carry them away. The Salt Path has a sequel titled The Wild Silence, but I’m not sure that I’m up to reading that one just yet. ( )
  SamSattler | Oct 13, 2021 |
A beautifully written memoir of a couple who takes to the trail when they suddenly become homeless. Their challenges were difficult and navigating 630 miles of trail in sometimes horrible weather conditions with barely any sustenance was an incredible story. I thought the author was truthful and humorous and loved her style of writing. Highly recommended. ( )
  tinkerbellkk | Sep 27, 2021 |
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Part One: Into the Light

Tell me about a man,

Muse, tell me how he wandered and was lost ...

Homer, The Odyssey
Part Two: The South West Coast Path

While some might be daunted at the prospect of walking, for weeks on end, staying somewhere different every night, while keeping themselves fed and watered, it is simply a matter of careful planning.

-Paddy Dillon, The South West Coast Path: From Minehead to South Haven Point.
Part Three: The Long Fetch

Often, for undaunted courage, fate spares the man it has not already marked.

-Seamus Heaney, Beowulf
Part Four: Lightly Salted Blackberries

Spoilt for choice - which one to throw,

which to pocket and take home.

-Simon Armitage, "The Stone Beach"
Part Five: Choices

Everybody needs beauty as well as bread.

-John Muir, The Yosemite
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For the team
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Prologue: There's a sound to breaking waves when they're close, a sound like nothing else.
Chapter 1. Dust of Life

I was under the stairs when I decided to walk.
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Packing a rucksack when you're fifty just isn't the same as when you're twenty.

Thirty years on and I had the aches of wenty years of manual labor, damage that never quite heals but stays malevolently in the background. (p. 22)
"I think I can feel homelessness now, like a balloon cut free in the wind. I'm scared.

"I'd hug you, Ray, but I can't sit up."

"Shall we eat the meatballs? I'm sure they weight the most." (p. 41)
The path led into the valley and down to Culbone Church, the smallest church in England, ancient, and once the site of a leper colony. I sat in the graveyard and let the utterly peaceful place wash over me. It was profoundly spiritual, nothing to do with God or religion, but a deeply human spirituality. (p. 45)
"Do we have a plan?"

"Course we do. We walk until we stop walking, and maybe on the way we find some kind of future." (p. 48)
Rather than layers of sweaty salt, my legs were crawling in ladybirds.

But they were too special and the shiny red wonders too numerous: there had to be more to it than that; they had to have a meaning for us.

No, I couldn't be scientific about it, and clung to the myth of the lady bird bringing good luck, carrying it with me in a rosy, spotted glow. I watched the pink aura lift from Moth and tried to believe in miracles. (p. 79)
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"Just days after Raynor Winn learns that Moth, her husband of thirty-two years, is terminally ill, their house and farm are taken away, along with their livelihood. With nothing left and little time, they make the brave and impulsive decision to walk the 630 miles of the sea-swept South West Coast Path, from Somerset to Dorset, through Devon and Cornwall. Carrying only the essentials for survival on their backs, they live wild in the ancient, weathered landscape of cliffs, sea, and sky. Yet through every step, every encounter, and every test along the way, their walk becomes a remarkable and life-affirming journey. Powerfully written and unflinchingly honest, The Salt Path is ultimately a portrayal of home--how it can be lost, rebuilt, and rediscovered in the most unexpected ways"--

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