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Palaces for the People: How Social…
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Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight… (2018 original; edició 2018)

de Eric Klinenberg (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2751173,736 (4.16)11
"An eminent sociologist--and coauthor, with Aziz Ansari, of the #1 New York Times bestseller Modern Romance--makes the provocative case that the future of democratic societies rests not only on shared values but also on shared "social infrastructure": the libraries, childcare centers, bookstores, coffee shops, pools, and parks that promote crucial, sometimes life-saving connections between people who might otherwise fail to find common cause"--Provided by publisher. "An eminent sociologist and bestselling author offers an inspiring blueprint for rebuilding our fractured society. We are living in a time of deep divisions. Americans are sorting themselves along racial, religious, and cultural lines, leading to a level of polarization that the country hasn't seen since the Civil War. Pundits and politicians are calling for us to come together, to find common purpose. But how, exactly, can this be done? In Palaces for the People, Eric Klinenberg suggests a way forward. He believes that the future of democratic societies rests not simply on shared values but on shared spaces: the libraries, childcare centers, bookstores, churches, synagogues, and parks where crucial, sometimes life-saving connections, are formed. These are places where people gather and linger, making friends across group lines and strengthening the entire community. Klinenberg calls this the 'social infrastructure': When it is strong, neighborhoods flourish; when it is neglected, as it has been in recent years, families and individuals must fend for themselves. Klinenberg takes us around the globe--from a floating school in Bangladesh to an arts incubator in Chicago, from a soccer pitch in Queens to an evangelical church in Houston--to show how social infrastructure is helping to solve some of our most pressing challenges: isolation, crime, education, addiction, political polarization, and even climate change. Richly reported, elegantly written, and ultimately uplifting, Palaces for the People urges us to acknowledge the crucial role these spaces play in civic life. Our social infrastructure could be the key to bridging our seemingly unbridgeable divides--and safeguarding democracy."--Jacket.… (més)
Membre:againes325
Títol:Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life
Autors:Eric Klinenberg (Autor)
Informació:Crown (2018), Edition: First Edition, 288 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life de Eric Klinenberg (2018)

  1. 00
    Better Buses, Better Cities: How to Plan, Run, and Win the Fight for Effective Transit de Steven Higashide (SamWhited)
    SamWhited: One component of social infrastructure and civic engagement is how we actually get to the places that bring us together. Our buses are a key component of our social infrastructure. If you liked Klinenberg's chapter on buses and public transit, you can dig in further with Higashide's book. If you liked Higashide's book on buses, you can get a better sense for how they fit into our broader social infrastructure with Klinenberg's work.… (més)
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» Mira també 11 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 11 (següent | mostra-les totes)
There are some great chapters about libraries as a community hub. ( )
  resoundingjoy | Jan 1, 2021 |
Good idea/information; disorganized execution. ( )
  joyblue | Nov 10, 2020 |
This may be one of the most important books of our time. People have been lamenting the loss of our sense of community, the degradation of the common good, for most of my life. Klinenberg strikes to the heart of what's missing: physical spaces where people can gather. Community space is such an easy thing to overlook and undervalue but it's perhaps the most important thing we can build for ourselves. Klinenberg presents a well-informed and compelling argument for the importance of social infrastructure, and offers ideas for how we can create and maintain it. Face-to-face interactions are how you forge a community. We need places that encourage us to spend time together. ( )
  johnthelibrarian | Aug 11, 2020 |
There are two things I love about Eric Klinenberg’s Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life. First, he makes a great case for things that matter to me – public investment in basic infrastructure that encourages us to live together in healthy ways. I’ll admit, he had me at public libraries, but I stayed for the parks, housing, education, public health, and preparation for climate change. Second, it’s a great example of research made accessible to non-experts, going on the shelf next to Matt Desmond’s Evicted, Cathy O’Neil’s Weapons of Math Destruction, and Virginia Eubanks' Automating Inequality among others. I would love to show students how the dry literature review can become a lively form of public communication. In this case, Klinenberg draws on loads of published scholarship as well as his own, weaving it together into a powerful argument.

cover Palaces for the PeopleBut it’s a big, complex argument, and some readers may find that challenging. He doesn’t focus on a singular problem, but writes about many, each of which is the subject of any number of books: social isolation, economic and racial stratification, the outsourcing of our social interactions to ad-tech companies, the opiod crisis, the defunding of libraries and schools, mistakes in urban planning, and climate change and what it means for our future lives together. His argument is that we need to think harder about how to build social infrastructure into the proposed solutions to all social problems because how we design things to benefit the humans who live with them matters as much as all the concrete or technology we pour into them.

Social infrastructure is not the same thing as social capital. It’s rather “the physical places and organizations that shape the way people interact,” and those things in turn determine whether or not we can develop social capital. (I was tickled by Klinenberg’s clever riff on “bowling alone” that adds to and to some extent refutes Robert Putnam’s classic.) We can influence the things that either help us feel connected and supported in a community - or isolated and alone. The need is pressing because we face a rise in authoritarianism, polarization, and oceans all at the same time.

The systems we built in the past were expressions of what we wanted for society. National parks, railroads, libraries, schools – they were bold statements about who we thought we could be. As our hard infrastructure crumbles and our social problems grow, we need to think about who we want to be, together: “Before we lift the next shovel, we should know what we want to improve, what we need to protect, and, more important, what kind of society we want to create.” He argues for an inclusive and democratic conversation about those things, harnessing not just civil engineering or tech solutionism but what we know about society to fix the fissures in our communities. The examples he explores are fascinating and give academics and librarians plenty to think about and to apply locally as we think about our own spaces and social interactions.

Titles can be misleading, as John Warner pointed out recently – and this one is, a bit. What Klinenberg advocates is not luxury along the lines of grand train stations of the past but decency and thoughtfulness in designing the spaces we live in, especially at a moment when the current administration has promised public investment in infrastructure. (Controlling immigration on the Mexican border by building a huge, expensive wall is mentioned as hard infrastructure that doesn’t have a soft side or great social benefit apart from temporary construction jobs.) The purpose of the book is stated more clearly in the subtitle, but publishers have a habit of overpromising when they put an elevator pitch on the cover.

In this case, the author delivers, but it also shows how ambitious this work is: an attempt to pull together research that addresses “soft” infrastructure at a moment when there’s talk of spending lots of money on “hard" infrastructure that could create stronger communities if planned thoughtfully and addressed to our most pressing problems rather than politically expedient promises. This includes expensive new projects like building breakwaters that invite community engagement while addressing rising sea levels, or simply funding public libraries adequately and understanding how they bind communities together.

If nothing else, the academic research Klinenberg has pulled into this narrative is cheering news that academic research, without making it over-simplified, can be fascinating and of great value if we understand it and act on it.
1 vota bfister | Apr 27, 2020 |
We should invest in social infrastructure as much as normal infrastructure. As a strong believer in libraries I am not going to argue. But sadly I can't see it happening and Klinenberg is probably preaching to the choir. ( )
  infjsarah | Jan 25, 2020 |
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"An eminent sociologist--and coauthor, with Aziz Ansari, of the #1 New York Times bestseller Modern Romance--makes the provocative case that the future of democratic societies rests not only on shared values but also on shared "social infrastructure": the libraries, childcare centers, bookstores, coffee shops, pools, and parks that promote crucial, sometimes life-saving connections between people who might otherwise fail to find common cause"--Provided by publisher. "An eminent sociologist and bestselling author offers an inspiring blueprint for rebuilding our fractured society. We are living in a time of deep divisions. Americans are sorting themselves along racial, religious, and cultural lines, leading to a level of polarization that the country hasn't seen since the Civil War. Pundits and politicians are calling for us to come together, to find common purpose. But how, exactly, can this be done? In Palaces for the People, Eric Klinenberg suggests a way forward. He believes that the future of democratic societies rests not simply on shared values but on shared spaces: the libraries, childcare centers, bookstores, churches, synagogues, and parks where crucial, sometimes life-saving connections, are formed. These are places where people gather and linger, making friends across group lines and strengthening the entire community. Klinenberg calls this the 'social infrastructure': When it is strong, neighborhoods flourish; when it is neglected, as it has been in recent years, families and individuals must fend for themselves. Klinenberg takes us around the globe--from a floating school in Bangladesh to an arts incubator in Chicago, from a soccer pitch in Queens to an evangelical church in Houston--to show how social infrastructure is helping to solve some of our most pressing challenges: isolation, crime, education, addiction, political polarization, and even climate change. Richly reported, elegantly written, and ultimately uplifting, Palaces for the People urges us to acknowledge the crucial role these spaces play in civic life. Our social infrastructure could be the key to bridging our seemingly unbridgeable divides--and safeguarding democracy."--Jacket.

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