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Ayesha At Last (2018)

de Uzma Jalaluddin

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
4694243,309 (3.81)38
As seen on The Today Show! One of the best summer romance picks! One of Publishers Weekly Best Romance Books of 2019! A modern-day Muslim Pride and Prejudice for a new generation of love. Ayesha Shamsi has a lot going on. Her dreams of being a poet have been set aside for a teaching job so she can pay off her debts to her wealthy uncle. She lives with her boisterous Muslim family and is always being reminded that her flighty younger cousin, Hafsa, is close to rejecting her one hundredth marriage proposal. Though Ayesha is lonely, she doesn't want an arranged marriage. Then she meets Khalid, who is just as smart and handsome as he is conservative and judgmental. She is irritatingly attracted to someone who looks down on her choices and who dresses like he belongs in the seventh century. When a surprise engagement is announced between Khalid and Hafsa, Ayesha is torn between how she feels about the straightforward Khalid and the unsettling new gossip she hears about his family. Looking into the rumors, she finds she has to deal with not only what she discovers about Khalid, but also the truth she realizes about herself.… (més)
  1. 30
    Unmarriageable de Soniah Kamal (cbl_tn)
    cbl_tn: Both books are inspired by Austen's Pride & Prejudice and are set in Muslim communities.
  2. 20
    Madras on Rainy Days de Samina Ali (avaland)
    avaland: This is NOT a romantic comedy, for those who wish to read a bit deeper on a similar subject, this is an excellent story about a 2nd generation Indian-American Muslim who reluctantly submits to her parents' wish for her to leave the US and accept an arranged marriage.… (més)
  3. 10
    Orgull i prejudici de Jane Austen (cbl_tn)
    cbl_tn: This novel was inspired by Austen's Pride and Prejudice, although it's not a strict retelling.
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» Mira també 38 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 42 (següent | mostra-les totes)
It took me a little while to get into Ayesha at Last – at the beginning I thought it was going to be another run-of-the-mill romance and as y’all know… that is not my genre. The deeper I got into the book the more I came to enjoy it. In particular, I really liked Ayesha herself.

If I’m going to read romance, this is how I like it. Ayesha at Last is down-to-Earth and doesn’t shy away from the ugliness of racism. There are a lot of shades of the Muslim faith in this book, and as someone who had very little knowledge on both the Muslim faith and Indian traditions, I really enjoyed the nuances to the world building. I also enjoyed the socio-economic differences between characters that added even more variety to the complex line-up.

Ayesha at Last is a Pride and Prejudice retelling, but I’ll tell you right upfront that you can be completely unfamiliar with Pride and Prejudice and still enjoy the novel. If anything, this story reminds me of elements of Shakespearean comedies… a similarity that was undoubtedly intentional considering how often the Bard was quoted. In addition, mistaken identities always remind me of Shakespeare. 🙂 Yet more nuances to this book I enjoyed! Also Ayesha’s grandparents are purely precious.

All the family relationships were really interesting, and all very different! From role models to benefactors to babysitting to unequal balances of power, there’s a wide variety of connections between characters which adds to the richness of the story. Aside from Ayesha and her grandparents, I also really liked Khalid’s relationship with his sister. The importance (and frustration!) of family comes through really well.

I thought Jalaluddin’s writing was fantastic. While Ayesha at Last may not be a book I run out to the bookstore to get (once is enough for most romances, in my opinion), this skill that went into writing this book proves that Jalaluddin is skilled at her craft. I’ll definitely pick up more books by this author. In addition to that, Ayesha at Last is an easy recommendation that I’d give to most the readers I know in real life!

If you’re looking for a desi romance with frequent, adorable confusion and occasional dramatic gestures, then Ayesha at Last is certainly for you. The minor revenge side plot and the beautifully described wedding are just bonuses after that. I definitely recommend reading this one – by the end, you’ll be cozy and smiling. ( )
  Morteana | Sep 11, 2021 |
audio fiction (11 hours) - Muslim Canadians finding love, dealing with an Islamophobic boss, and sorting out complicated messes with a healthy dose of Shakespearean drama.

Truly impressive debut with a little bit of everything with plenty of substance for those who want more than your typical love story; as soon as I finished I got on the waiting list for Hana Khan Carries On ( )
  reader1009 | Sep 9, 2021 |
More of a 3.5.

This has been a year for desi P&P retellings, so I was very excited when the US release date for this book was announced and I also managed to get the ARC. I had heard a lot of good things about it, but I kept my expectations normal because I feel P&P doesn’t always translate to contemporaries very well and I didn’t wanna be totally disappointed. So I’m quite happy to report that I had fun reading this book.

Both Ayesha and Khalid are in their late 20s but their views on what they want to do and how they want to get married are drastically different. Ayesha maybe a substitute teacher but her true passion is poetry, even though she tries to curb that side of her because it’s not practical and she wants to support her family. She is religious, always dons her hijab, is very very loyal to her family but is also pretty liberal in her views. She is also not very interested in marriage but there are instances when she wonders about how she will find her true love or happiness, and I really empathized with her. Khalid on the other hand is much more conservative and socially awkward, has decided to let his mom pick his wife because he thinks it’s the right thing to do, and is quite adamant in his belief that love and happiness comes after marriage. He is actually very sweet and kind (mostly) but because of his attire, people always tend to make harsh judgments about him.

There is the usual misunderstandings and prejudices that come into play like in P&P when they start interacting with each other, and I quite enjoyed their dynamic develop. They are actually quite judgmental about the other many times through the story but Khalid learns a lot and grows into someone who is more accepting. Ayesha apologized a bit too but I didn’t see the same amount of growth in her. But the way their friendship blossomed, how they couldn’t stop falling for each other but still tried to for the sake of their families and their mutual pining really made this a nice romcom.

The writing was quite easy to get through, even though it felt a little off at times. The use of Urdu words in between was amazing, but there were a lot of Shakespeare references too that took me out of the story a bit (it’s a personal problem though and other readers might really enjoy it). I liked that the author tries to represent different kinds of Muslims in her story - from the more conservative and faithful to those on the more liberal side of the spectrum, and everywhere in between. The whole desi “aunty brigade” who are nosy and all up in your business, our obsession with early marriages, every MIL’s search for a docile daughter in law and all the mama’s boys made for very nostalgic reading and reminded me of so many people in my own extended family. I was actually delighted to see that both the families in this story are originally from Hyderabad, my hometown in India and it made me feel like going home soon. The tone of book was very humorous for most of the first half and I really enjoyed it, but it turns into a lot of drama in the latter half. While the author sensitively tackles issues like workplace harassment and Islamophobia, I think it went a little too far, especially with the horrible boss. There are also too many other subplots and each of the supposed villains felt like extreme caricatures, which made the second half of the book overly dramatic and bit dragged on.

Overall, this was a mostly sweet and fun romcom to read which I finished rather quickly. If you like Jane Austen retellings and would love some desi Muslim representation in them, then this is a lovely book to read. It can get tad over the top at times but it’s mostly very enjoyable.

( )
  ksahitya1987 | Aug 20, 2021 |
I received a free ebook copy of Ayesha at Last from NetGalley in exchange for feedback and an honest review.

Living with her close knit family in Canada, marriage is far from teacher and poet Ayesha's mind. It's quite enough to be starting her teaching job and following her cousin Hafsa's antics -- of late, preparing for her own arranged marriage. When Ayesha meets Khalid, who intends for his mother to choose his partner, they clash -- and sparks fly, though neither is likely to admit it.

Ayesha at Last is restorative, like a good cup of tea. Ayesha's family, from her Shakespeare quoting Nana to her best friend Clara, were lovely. I wanted to spend time with them, myself. Both Khalid and Ayesha learn to become more true to themselves in the process of finding each other; it was a very sweet read. ( )
  kittenelephant | Jul 29, 2021 |
I thoroughly enjoyed this book! ( )
  bookishreputation | Jul 28, 2021 |
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As seen on The Today Show! One of the best summer romance picks! One of Publishers Weekly Best Romance Books of 2019! A modern-day Muslim Pride and Prejudice for a new generation of love. Ayesha Shamsi has a lot going on. Her dreams of being a poet have been set aside for a teaching job so she can pay off her debts to her wealthy uncle. She lives with her boisterous Muslim family and is always being reminded that her flighty younger cousin, Hafsa, is close to rejecting her one hundredth marriage proposal. Though Ayesha is lonely, she doesn't want an arranged marriage. Then she meets Khalid, who is just as smart and handsome as he is conservative and judgmental. She is irritatingly attracted to someone who looks down on her choices and who dresses like he belongs in the seventh century. When a surprise engagement is announced between Khalid and Hafsa, Ayesha is torn between how she feels about the straightforward Khalid and the unsettling new gossip she hears about his family. Looking into the rumors, she finds she has to deal with not only what she discovers about Khalid, but also the truth she realizes about herself.

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