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VOX de Christina Dalcher
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VOX

de Christina Dalcher (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,0098414,999 (3.61)41
On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than one hundred words per day, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial. This can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her. This is just the beginning. Soon women are not permitted to hold jobs. Girls are not taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke sixteen thousand words each day, but now women have only one hundred to make themselves heard. For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice.… (més)
Membre:NairitaB
Títol:VOX
Autors:Christina Dalcher (Autor)
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Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca, Per llegir
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Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Vox de Christina Dalcher

  1. 30
    The Handmaid's Tale de Margaret Atwood (vwinsloe)
  2. 10
    Native Tongue de Suzette Haden Elgin (2wonderY)
    2wonderY: Women's right have been removed. They develop a private language. This is a minor classic.
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Anglès (82)  Pirata (1)  Alemany (1)  Totes les llengües (84)
Es mostren 1-5 de 84 (següent | mostra-les totes)
It pains me that a story with a great premise as this has is so disappointing. I won't go into detail about the storyline since pretty much every review has done that. But a book about limiting all females in the US to 100 words a day was too intriguing to pass up. There are more limits on the females, but the focus is the lack of a voice. We all want our voice heard, females and males alike, and being virtually silenced and therefore made almost invisible would be stunning. This is why, as a dystopian novel among many right now, this one caught my attention.

It starts out well. Jean McClellan is a neurolinguist whose life has been devoted to language. Now she can't speak more than her limit, and she can't work because a woman's place is in the home. And most painful of all, her six year old daughter is virtually silent since she tries to be obedient plus she can win prizes at school for saying the least. Fortunately for Jean, she is afforded an opportunity to lose her word counter bracelet for a brief time when the US president needs her help.

When Jean goes to a government facility to work on a serum, the story takes a crazy turn. It felt like a cross between Jason Bourne and MacGyver as Jean, her former boss, and Jean's lover try to foil the government's plan when they realize that there is more at stake than they were told. Jean and her lover take unbelievable risks to be together when it would mean an exile of complete silence and hard labor for Jean if they were caught. The action picks up in a rush to the finish with ridiculous events happening one after another.

What a disappointment for what could have been. The occasional comparisons to The Handmaid's Tale are insulting since Dalcher hits the reader over the head repeatedly with scenes straight out of a Hollywood thriller. The only thing missing is a multi-car chase scene. Skip this book since there are far better dystopian novels out there. ( )
  boldforbs | Jan 15, 2021 |
I have mixed emotions after reading this book. This is probably one of the hardest reviews I've ever had to write. It took me a couple days of thinking it over before I could figure out what I needed to say....and then the right words to say it.

I wanted so badly to enjoy and really "feel'' this story. But it really didn't work for me. On the one hand, as a woman, I totally understand what it's trying to say. But, on the other hand, I didn't enjoy the way it went about it. As a reviewer, I have to be honest. I really never felt plugged into the plot. I'm a strong enough woman to go against the flow and say I really didn't like this book. I almost DNF'd it....but I felt it was important that I stuck with it until the end.

Vox is set in a future America where women have lost the right to speak, to be educated, and even to write. The female main character, Jean McClellan, was a neurologist before a ultra conservative right wing government took all women out of the workforce, sending them home to be almost completely silent homemakers. She can no longer be a doctor. She can no longer write poetry. She can't even have a passport. And any woman, even children, who speak more than the 100 word limit in a day receive a very painful electric shock. Women have effectively been silenced.

This is an intriguing premise, and I jumped right on the chance to read an ARC of this book. But, in places, the plot and characterizations just fell a bit flat for me. The situation is painted so bleak and dark and inescapable that at times it came off as a bit too melodramatic or over-the-top -- not really believable. I could see women being banned from public office, important positions such as doctors and lawyers and maybe even being restricted from attending college. But, a world where women aren't allowed to read books, write down words or speak above a word limit just seemed silly to me. Is the story making an important statement? Yes. But, I'm going to be honest and say that while the premise is excellent....the execution of it could be better. There is truth in the fact that it is possible for a group of people to be singled out, victimized, mistreated and even killed by an out of control goverment and populus. Look at what Germany did to Jews during World War II. Millions murdered, tortured, starved to death....for utterly ridiculous reasons based on pseudoscience and racist BS. So, it can happen. And has happened. Still happens. But, the idea of women being forced to wear word counter bracelets and being shocked for speaking, books being locked up in cabinets so women can't read and females being restricted from most areas of the work force just seems a bit of an overkill. An honest review means an honest review....the plot came off as a bit forced and melodramatic to me several times as I was reading. BUT, after I say that, I do have to add that it also made me angry and caused me to really think about instances from my own life where I felt silenced or powerless because I'm a woman. I was brutalized and raped by a man who felt belittled by my intelligence and success. And he made it out to be my fault. I "made him do it.'' Really?? As a child I was told by an adult close to me that I was "nothing, and was never going to be anything.'' Really?? And when I was struggling to raise my son alone after a divorce and asked my employer for a raise, his response was "Don't you get child support?'' Really? Would a man have been treated that way? I deserved that raise! Or the time I was offered an envelope filled with cash by a married man if I would agree to have sex with him. Really? So, believe me....I "get'' it. I've lived it. I just didn't totally buy the version in this book.

This story is definitely thought provoking. And it definitely had an impact on me. But I really wish I had liked it more than I did.

**I voluntarily read an advance readers copy of this book Berkley via FirstToRead. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.** ( )
  JuliW | Nov 22, 2020 |
This book caused me to value my voice in a way that I haven’t before. An exploration on what could happen if women were not valued for their voice and minds. The main character fights for her and her daughters right to speak more than 100 words a day. This book was terrifying to read because the reality is that it is not only so easy to take women’s rights for granted, they could easily be taken away.

Dalcher writes an insightful novel that might hit a little close to home. She weaves in science fiction with a reflection on women’s rights. It starts a little slow, but the end is packed with quick paced action. This quick read will definitely give you a lot to think about! This is a book that will not be easily forgotten. ( )
  hilarymichelle001 | Nov 3, 2020 |
This book reminded me of The Handmaid's Tale. Women and girls are allowed only 100 words a day. The bracelet they wear will shock them if they go over. The more you go over the worse the pain and injury to you. I was hoping for more out of this book. I felt like even though there were flashbacks to kind of explain how they got there I felt like there was a ton of missing details. I felt like some of the storyline with Jean wasn't exactly believable. Though I gave the book 3 stars I just found it ok. It wasn't bad, but it could have definitely been better. ( )
  i.should.b.reading | Oct 29, 2020 |
An interesting dystopian novel that investigates just how far one mother will go to protect her little girls right to speech. The main character, Jean, specialises in linguistics which adds another level to the frightening question of who do we become if we no longer have a voice?

I enjoyed this book, but feel that the ending was a little bit sudden and rushed.

⭐️⭐️⭐️ ( )
  Kera.Cudmore | Oct 1, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 84 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Subtlety is not a concern here, and the theme of “wake up!” is hammered home so vigorously that it can feel hectoring. “Not your fault,” a man says to Jean. “But it is,” she thinks. “My fault started two decades ago, the first time I didn’t vote … was too busy to go on [a march].” It’s of a piece with the preposterous setup, the payoff-heavy writing and the casual appropriation of some of humanity’s most heinous instruments of oppression – labour camps, electrified restraints – in the service of a thriller. If Dalcher wants to scare people into waking up, she would do better to send them back to the history books, rather than forward into an overblown, hastily imagined future.
afegit per -pilgrim- | editaThe Guardian, Carrie O'Grady (Aug 22, 2018)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (11 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Dalcher, Christinaautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Whelan, JuliaNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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In memory of Charlie Jones linguist, professor, friend.
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If anyone told me I could bring down the president, and the Pure Movement, and that incompetent little shit Morgan LeBron in a week’s time, I wouldn’t believe them.
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No n'hi ha cap

On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than one hundred words per day, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial. This can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her. This is just the beginning. Soon women are not permitted to hold jobs. Girls are not taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke sixteen thousand words each day, but now women have only one hundred to make themselves heard. For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice.

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