IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Cold Iron (Masters & Mages) (2018)

de Miles Cameron

Sèrie: Masters & Mages (book 1)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses
1233188,993 (4.03)Cap
A young mage-in-training takes up the sword and is unwittingly pulled into a violent political upheaval, in the first book of this epic fantasy trilogy by Miles Cameron, author of The Red Knight. Aranthur is a promising young mage. But the world is not safe and after a confrontation leaves him no choice but to display his skill with a blade, Aranthur is instructed to train under a renowned Master of Swords. During his intensive training he begins to question the bloody life he's chosen. And while studying under the Master, he finds himself thrown into the middle of a political revolt that will impact everyone he's come to know. To protect his friends, Arnathur will be forced to decide if he can truly follow the Master of Swords into a life of violence and cold-hearted commitment to the blade. Masters & Mages Cold Iron For more from Miles Cameron, check out: The Traitor Son Cycle The Red Knight The Fell Sword The Dread Wyrm The Plague of Swords The Fall of Dragons… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

Es mostren totes 3
Cameron, Miles. Cold Iron. Masters and Mages No. 1. Gollancz, 2018.
Since I recently enjoyed reading Miles Cameron’s new space opera, Artifact Space, I thought I would read one of his older fantasy novels. I was not surprised by what I found. Cold Iron offers a complex, well-crafted world with plenty of action and a strong central character. The hero, Aranthur, is the son of a mountain farmer who has gone to the city to study magic and become a priest, but his extracurricular fencing lessons threaten to derail his education. The descriptions of swordplay are one of the strong points of the novel, and I suspect that Cameron has studied fencing somewhere. To learn magic, Aranthur must learn several languages from cultures with specialized magic traditions, and as readers, we must learn along with him. Cameron does not do long passages of exposition, so understanding the world in which Aranthur lives is an entertaining challenge for the reader. I found myself looking up place names, which resembled but were not quite real-world places. Aranthur, for example, studies magic at the Haigia Sophia in Megara, but it doesn’t seem exactly like the world historical site we know. I had an aha moment when I discovered that the book series is an offshoot of a tabletop RPG Cameron wrote in 2016. He also wrote a helpful guide that explains some of the differences between the world of the game and the world of the novel. It gives you a good picture of the world, and it can be found here: Players-Guide-final-small.pdf (christiancameronauthor.com). I look forward to reading the next book in the series. 4 stars. ( )
  Tom-e | Aug 1, 2021 |
I really loved this book. The characters were diverse and well developed through the story.
The action and descriptions of the fights were colorful and educational. The plot is not straight forward and keeps you guessing.
I look forward to the next installment.

Actual Ratings:- 4.5 stars ( )
  ShreyasDeshpande | Oct 24, 2020 |
Fantasy bildungsroman examples tend towards the very good and the relatively bad. Cold Iron, though indisputably a bildungsroman, falls into the very good category.

It begins with a precipitating set of events which bring together some important characters (some already important in terms of their society, some about to be) which set off a year or so of cascading results. Aranthur, the viewpoint character, finds himself at the centre of a those results, sometimes by the internal logic of events , sometimes by chance. (It's subtly suggested that the chance may be apparent – that Tyche, the goddess of chance, is actively nudging things around. There's no agreement in this world about the gods, but their influence isn't ruled out, either). He's a student, full-grown but still between worlds (his family are farmers; he's a student in magic at the equivalent of Constantinople), competent but no genius, and he has a good deal to learn as far as maturity goes (it's the growth into greater maturity which makes this a true bildungsroman and not simply a tale of conflict between the relatively light and relatively dark). Cameron's prose and characterization are engaging, and his world-building interesting: there's no point at which the narrative hits slack points.

Alternatively, this can be viewed as a novel with a secondary primary viewpoint character (think of Watson, or Julian Comstock): one where the narrative viewpoint is on the outside of what is going on, not a principal in it. For most of the book, that's Aranthur: the people he sees, he doesn't understand (either with regard to motivations or the real roles they are playing); much of the action in which he is involved takes place in the background (to such a degree that there's a massive context switch on the last page of the book that resets a whole set of things which the reader, and Aranthur, thought up until that point). He picks up more knowledge, maturity, and skills as the novel goes on, but until about the last forty pages of the novel he's fairly peripheral to the overall plot in the background. (This is one of those novels where you have to read the novel twice, a second time to appreciate the details which mean something different with more knowledge). From this perspective, the book begins in medias res, with a great deal of prior action as background.

Cameron's previous fantasy series was organized around battles: this volume is structured to show a succession of one-on-one (or few-on-few) swordfights, with attention paid to the details of different styles of fighting and types of swords; the details are authentic. The worldbuilding is careful: social structure is based loosely on Venice, but the location is an analogue of the Byzantine Empire and the linguistic cues (names, brief citations) are precisely set up. ( )
1 vota jsburbidge | Sep 4, 2018 |
Es mostren totes 3
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

Pertany a aquestes sèries

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

Cap

A young mage-in-training takes up the sword and is unwittingly pulled into a violent political upheaval, in the first book of this epic fantasy trilogy by Miles Cameron, author of The Red Knight. Aranthur is a promising young mage. But the world is not safe and after a confrontation leaves him no choice but to display his skill with a blade, Aranthur is instructed to train under a renowned Master of Swords. During his intensive training he begins to question the bloody life he's chosen. And while studying under the Master, he finds himself thrown into the middle of a political revolt that will impact everyone he's come to know. To protect his friends, Arnathur will be forced to decide if he can truly follow the Master of Swords into a life of violence and cold-hearted commitment to the blade. Masters & Mages Cold Iron For more from Miles Cameron, check out: The Traitor Son Cycle The Red Knight The Fell Sword The Dread Wyrm The Plague of Swords The Fall of Dragons

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.03)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 10
4.5 1
5 5

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 173,999,459 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible