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The Wizard of London (Elemental Masters, #5)…
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The Wizard of London (Elemental Masters, #5) (2005)

de Mercedes Lackey

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1,4211710,068 (3.65)38
Sarah Jane has come to Isabelle Harton's school in London, a happy child with unusual gifts, but will Isabelle be able to keep her safe from a powerful intent to harm her?
Membre:crankybookwyrm
Títol:The Wizard of London (Elemental Masters, #5)
Autors:Mercedes Lackey
Informació:Publisher Unknown, Kindle Edition
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
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Etiquetes:to-read

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The Wizard of London de Mercedes Lackey (2005)

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Es mostren 1-5 de 17 (següent | mostra-les totes)
This episode in the Elemental Masters series moves away from the Elemental Masters themselves to another group of people who have various psychic powers. Isabelle Harton was a vicar's daughter raised around those of a higher social class than her own. When her upper class beau - David Alderscroft - dropped her with no warning, she travelled to India where she learned about her own unique powers, married a man with similar powers, gathered friends, and returned to London to open a school for ex-patriot children who have Talents and powers.

Sarah Lyon-White was nine when she came to the Harton School from Africa. Her parents, both Earth Masters, know they can't train Sarah in her different gifts. Sarah looks to be growing into a true medium. Sarah does have a guardian and protector in her African Gray parrot whom she names Gray.

Nan Killian is a street kid who comes to the door of the Harton School for the daily handouts. She has a way of knowing when someone presents a danger to her. When she is almost snatched by men her gin-soaked mother has sold her to, Nan and Sarah run and are rescued by some of Isobel Harton's friends who are guards at the school. Nan is taken in at the school and becomes Sarah's new best friend. Nan also wants a bird like Sarah has, and a trip to the Tower of London finds her bringing home one of the Queen's ravens who becomes her friend and guardian Neville.

Unmasking a fake medium brings the children to the attention of an Elemental Master who has gone to the dark side. A trip to a house inhabited by an ancient evil spirit is arranged by that Master, but intervention by the Hartons and their friends, and an early onset of Nan's Aspect, manages to save them from disaster.

The disaster does manage to result in the transfer of the school to a country home for the summer where Isabelle meets David again and finds him much changed. He has fallen under the influence of the dark master and it will take everyone's efforts to free him from that influence and save him. Isabelle isn't certain that she can forgive him for what he did to her as a girl, and isn't sure she wants to save him now. But the girls, especially Sarah, sees some good in him and knows that he must be saved if the future is not to turn very, very bad.

The story is lushly told and very vivid. The characters, including the Puck, add depth and richness to the tale. The setting in a pre-World War I England, but one infused with magic, is well-imagined and drawn.

Fans of fantasy and alternate history and stories with fairy tale influences will really enjoy this book and this series. ( )
  kmartin802 | Sep 28, 2021 |
I listened to the audio edition. Amazon continues its foolishly short-sighted practice of not allowing linking to Audible editions, even though they own Audible and presumably make money from the sale of Audible editions. So, I'm linking to a print edition.

I hadn't read any Lackey in quite a while, having grown tired of what I thought of as her typical output. A friend recommended this, and I was very pleasantly surprised.

This is a "secret history" set in late Victorian England, with Elemental Mages (who possess what we would call magical powers based in the four elemental powers of earth, air, fire, and water) and the Gifted and Talented (who possess what we would call psychic powers, which are in this world referred to as occult powers) operate quietly behind the scenes, with most of the population unaware of their existence.

Isabelle Harton, with her husband Frederick, runs the Harton School for Boys and Girls, intended to serve the children of British soldiers, missionaries, and government officials serving abroad, as well as the "gifted and talented" children who aren't adequately served by the more numerous schools serving those with Elemental powers. Sarah Jane, just nine years old, is sent to the Harton School from Africa, where her parents are missionary healers. Sarah Jane is clearly among the Talented, but it's not clear what her gift is, and of course her parents do not commit that information to pen and paper. Sarah Jane settles in quickly, and befriends a street urchin, Nan, who has her own problems and, it turns out, her own Talent, and all is well for a time.

Then it becomes clear that Sarah Jane has the rarest of all Talents, a genuine ability to communicate with the spirits of the dead. Shortly thereafter, there is an attempt by an elemental master to arrange the deaths of both girls.

Isabelle and Frederick, who have been concerned for a bit that the sudden gathering of several Talented children in London means that those Talents will be needed, now know that the girls are in immediate danger, and must find the source of the threat and the real aim of whoever their unknown enemy is. This is a fun, engaging adventure with well-drawn characters, not just the girls themselves and the other principal members of the Harton household, but their enemies and allies, including Robin Goodfellow (yes, that one), David Alderscroft, the Fire Mage who courted and jilted Isabelle many years ago, and his mentor, the Air Mage Lady Cordelia.

Very enjoyable, and I'm planning to look up the earlier books in the serious. Recommended.

I borrowed this book from a friend. ( )
  LisCarey | Sep 19, 2018 |
The Wizard of London is a relatively light-weight and entertaining fantasy set in an alternate Victorian England where various kinds of magic exist. It's one of a series – Elemental Masters -- and not the first, though it's the first one I've read. It stands alone, but other titles in the series that precede it are: The Serpent's Shadow, The Gates of Sleep, and Phoenix and Ashes.

The strength of this book, I thought, was in the characters and the setting rather than in the magic or the plot. I especially enjoyed seeing Victorian London – and then the English countryside – through the eyes of Nan, a street-bred Cockney girl. There is a lot of ironic charm in that point of view and Lackey handles it very well. Her writing is richly descriptive and assured, overall. The plot climax was a bit low-key and probably wouldn't satisfy readers who are looking for excitement. I found it adequately satisfying in the context of the other elements of a period story that focuses on two psychically-gifted girls and the woman who runs the special school they are attending. These three characters are well-drawn, as are the other more minor characters, as well as the villain. Special appearances by Robin Goodfellow (Puck) were fun too.

I could see this working pretty well as a book for pre-teen children, especially girls, because of the focus on the two girls, Nan and Sarah. The intended audience is apparently adults, however, since there is also a focus on the schoolmistress, Isabelle Harton, and there are other adult POV characters as well.

Other reviewers have noted that this is a "retelling" of Hans Christian Anderson's The Snow Queen, but I quite missed the connection. Apparently it's rather tenuous. I took the book at face value and found it moderately enjoyable. ( )
  Carol_W | Jul 17, 2015 |
This book took me far longer to read than I would have liked thanks to problems in real life. However, I enjoyed it, for the most part. It was a little draggy, in certain aspects, and I can understand how the romance between Isabelle and Frederick seemed a bit much.



However, after I realized just what David Alderscoft had done to himself, it was hard not to feel sorry for him. Thanks to Cordelia's manipulations, he had lost the one thing that he could have prized above everything. Now the juxtaposition was clear, between Frederick and David, and why Frederick was invariably a better man for Isabelle.



I would like to see another book dealing with the Fey, not just some of the magical creatures that sporadically appear. For example, I loved Puck's appearance. Perhaps Mercedes Lackey should write a series revolving around faeries.



The ending was good. It showed how the children knew more about life than someone who had considered himself above everyone else and how a child could conquer an adult simply by reaching out. I also like how the Salamanders and other Fire Elemental creatures were simply waiting for David to return to his senses and summon them, rather than abandon him.



The notion of ice being the opposite of fire yet still being within a Fire Elemental's power to control is an interesting one. I loved the explanation of it, too, and also, the similarities, however unintentional, between Cordelia wanting to be an Ice Queen and Puck calling the children "daughters/sons of Eve/Adam" and Narnia. Maybe it was just me who saw those comparisons, however.
  liveshipvivacia | Apr 26, 2014 |
This book took me far longer to read than I would have liked thanks to problems in real life. However, I enjoyed it, for the most part. It was a little draggy, in certain aspects, and I can understand how the romance between Isabelle and Frederick seemed a bit much.



However, after I realized just what David Alderscoft had done to himself, it was hard not to feel sorry for him. Thanks to Cordelia's manipulations, he had lost the one thing that he could have prized above everything. Now the juxtaposition was clear, between Frederick and David, and why Frederick was invariably a better man for Isabelle.



I would like to see another book dealing with the Fey, not just some of the magical creatures that sporadically appear. For example, I loved Puck's appearance. Perhaps Mercedes Lackey should write a series revolving around faeries.



The ending was good. It showed how the children knew more about life than someone who had considered himself above everyone else and how a child could conquer an adult simply by reaching out. I also like how the Salamanders and other Fire Elemental creatures were simply waiting for David to return to his senses and summon them, rather than abandon him.



The notion of ice being the opposite of fire yet still being within a Fire Elemental's power to control is an interesting one. I loved the explanation of it, too, and also, the similarities, however unintentional, between Cordelia wanting to be an Ice Queen and Puck calling the children "daughters/sons of Eve/Adam" and Narnia. Maybe it was just me who saw those comparisons, however.
  liveshipvivacia | Apr 26, 2014 |
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Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Mercedes Lackeyautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Ford, MichelleNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Lee,Jody A.Autor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

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Isabelle Helen Harton waited on the dock beside the gangplank for the last of the steamer passengers from Egypt and Africa to disembark.
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Sarah Jane has come to Isabelle Harton's school in London, a happy child with unusual gifts, but will Isabelle be able to keep her safe from a powerful intent to harm her?

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