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Wanderers: A Novel de Chuck Wendig
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Wanderers: A Novel (edició 2019)

de Chuck Wendig (Autor)

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6943025,854 (3.84)17
A decadent rock star. A deeply religious radio host. A disgraced scientist. And a teenage girl who may be the world's last hope. In the tradition of The Stand and Station Eleven comes a gripping saga that weaves an epic tapestry of humanity into an astonishing tale of survival. Shana wakes up one morning to discover her little sister in the grip of a strange malady. She appears to be sleepwalking. She cannot talk and cannot be woken up. And she is heading with inexorable determination to a destination that only she knows. But Shana and her sister are not alone. Soon they are joined by a flock of sleepwalkers from across America, on the same mysterious journey. And like Shana, there are other "shepherds" who follow the flock to protect their friends and family on the long dark road ahead. For on their journey, they will discover an America convulsed with terror and violence, where this apocalyptic epidemic proves less dangerous than the fear of it. As the rest of society collapses all around them--and an ultraviolent militia threatens to exterminate them--the fate of the sleepwalkers depends on unraveling the mystery behind the epidemic. The terrifying secret will either tear the nation apart--or bring the survivors together to remake a shattered world.… (més)
Membre:tank1010
Títol:Wanderers: A Novel
Autors:Chuck Wendig (Autor)
Informació:Del Rey (2019), Edition: First Edition first Printing, 800 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
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Wanderers de Chuck Wendig

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» Mira també 17 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 30 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Un page-turner de 1000 pages
C'est sur les conseils de Pierre-Antoine Rambaud que j'ai découvert ce livre... qu'il en soit remercié tant j'ai passé un bon moment avec cette lecture.
Difficile de parler de ce roman sans en dévoiler l'intrigue. Toutefois, il est question :
de somnambules qui explosent quand on tente d'arrêter leur marche ;
d'une traversée des Etats-Unis ;
d'une intelligence artificielle ;
d'une pandémie (tient ça nous dit peut-être quelque-chose) ;
de suprématistes blancs...
Tous ces éléments qui, à priori n'ont pas de lien entre eux, vont s'articuler au fil d'un récit totalement maitrisé par l'auteur. Car, oui, c'est bien la capacité de Wending à relancer sans cesse son histoire qui fait tout l'intérêt du roman... voire ses histoires car plusieurs sont imbriquées les unes aux autres.
On peut se dire que 1000 pages c'est énorme, mais je vous assure que lorsque vous finirez vous regretterez que ça ne continue pas. ( )
  FredLeger | Sep 10, 2021 |
Interesting that I started this book just after three terms had just entered into standard usage:

Social distancing
Coronavirus
COVID-19


And then along comes a novel with not one, but two different diseases. I'm not going to compare this book, as many are, to [b:The Stand|149267|The Stand|Stephen King|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1213131305l/149267._SX50_.jpg|1742269] and/or [b:Swan Song|11557|Swan Song|Robert R. McCammon|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1445981000l/11557._SY75_.jpg|2947187]. If anything, it may be a closer brother to Niven and Pournelle's [b:Lucifer's Hammer|218467|Lucifer's Hammer|Larry Niven|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1388268115l/218467._SY75_.jpg|1842237] in that it takes much more time detailing the end of the world than its aftermath. But each one is its own animal, and comparing doesn't do justice to any of them. We all know The Stand wins anyway.

So...Wanderers...Wendig is a good writer. Not a great one, and there always seems to be a bit of a limit, or ceiling that he just can't seem to get past to nudge him into that "great writer" category. I've never been able to put my finger on why before now, but going through 32 hours (well, okay, more like 14, because I listen at slightly more than twice the speed) of his narrative, I think I've maybe got a theory.

Wendig is a big, wonderful, beautiful nerd, and he wears his influences loud and proud. Unfortunately, this means his characters reference his own loves, like Douglas Adams, and Stephen King, and Star Wars, and all manner of science fiction and fantasy. Which is fine, if it's a single character who is Wendig's avatar in the novel, but the references keep popping up in various characters throughout the book. And all I could keep thinking was, goddamn it Chuck, get the hell out of your own way, edit that shit out, make them their own people, and get on with the story.

I'm sure others will vociferously disagree with me, which is fine.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying don't read Wendig. I'm saying the opposite: Do read Chuck, because he has a lot of interesting things to say, and in this novel, he gives fascinating insights into quantum AI, disease vectors, Trumpian politics, and religion (is there any end of the world novel—aside from Lucifer's Hammer—that doesn't get into religion?). As well, his characters are often interesting.

That being said, his white supremacist villains are very one-note boring. His aging, still-in-the-closet fading rock star, while amusing, is pretty much every literary rock star you've ever met: a variation on the hooker with the heart of gold. Wendig also does a rather extreme about-face on one character's firmly-held beliefs that I just found rang hollow, regardless of the trauma he was put through.

And then, there's the ending. I'm not going to spoil anything (well, okay, I'm going to spoil a very minor stupid thing), but I'll say that the big revelation at the end was really not a big revelation. I'll also say that, after spending 800 pages with some of these characters and their arcs, Wendig seems to simply abandon them in the last few pages, as though he simply ran out of ink, or out of ideas to close those arcs down.

And that minor stupid spoiler? Sorry if it takes an aging rock star almost forty years to recognize Willie Nelson embodies the outlaw rocker spirit in a similar way Johnny Cash did...that's not a big epiphany, Chuck.

So, in the end, while it took a while to start, and sort of fizzled in the last few pages, it was mostly a good read in between, providing you don't mind the author leaving clumsy fingerprints and boot marks everywhere along the way.

Go read The Stand. Or, despite being really dated now, Lucifer's Hammer. Both, I think, are more rewarding reads. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
I can’t say I necessarily had any reservations about reading Chuck Wendig’s Wanderers (2020) right now, as our current global pandemic is ramping itself back up into nightmare territory. I figured the story of a group of people who out of nowhere turn into unresponsive sleepwalkers who leave their homes and form an ever-increasing block on the road to … somewhere … wouldn’t ring many bells with the reality of Covid-19 and its maddening variants.

And that was mostly true, although there are enough similarities to be disturbing. On the other hand, disturbing readers is kind of what the horror genre is all about, so caveat lector and all that. And putting aside whether it’s a little too on the nose right now, I found Wanderers to be a compelling read.

The parade of sleepwalkers begins with a single teenager, who is unresponsive to attempts to talk or interact with her, relentlessly putting one foot in front of the other and refusing to deviate from her route. When her sister tries to intervene and stop her march, the wanderer undergoes alarming physical changes that quickly discourage any further attempts to divert her. People come out of their houses as she passes by, in the same catatonic state, and join her. No one knows why it’s happening, how people are “infected” by the sleepwalking illness (if that’s what it is) or how to stop it. As the walkers continue on their way, some of their loved ones form a support group that travels with them to make sure they are safe. Other people, without any family or friends among the afflicted, become hostile to something they don’t understand. Conspiracy theories abound as to the cause and the ultimate outcome, none of which have any effect on the wanderers themselves, who seem to have a definite destination in mind but are unable to communicate in any way with the unafflicted.

It took a while for the narrative to reach its full velocity, but it does get there eventually and once it does, I was helpless to stop reading. There may have been a few too many subplots, which led to spending more time with secondary characters than I would have liked, but that’s a minor quibble. I wasn’t surprised to find that the parts of this science fiction novel I enjoyed the least were the parts that hit a little too close to current events — the demagogue presidential candidate, the white supremacist militias, and so on. I prefer my horror to be a little less grounded in reality, thanks.

Nevertheless, I appreciated the plot twists that I at least did not see coming. I was less appreciative when the story ended on a semi-cliffhanger that made it clear there will be another book to truly finish off the plot. Having said that, I’m pretty sure when the next installment is published, I’ll be ready to revisit the Wanderers universe once again. ( )
  rosalita | Aug 5, 2021 |
Almost 800 pages which is way too much. One-dimensional characters, none of them interesting or worth caring about. Speeches that sound like talking points read on the Internet. Too religiousy for my taste. A disappointment. ( )
  SocProf9740 | Jul 11, 2021 |
Hard to rate this one. At various times, 2-star, 3-star, 4-star or 5-star. Much like Stephen King's The Stand, I think an abridged version will be published although I do not think this book is nearly as good, perhaps because dystopian fiction has had 30 years of development.

One morning, Shana discovers her younger sister Nessie walking outside, completely disconnected from her surroundings. And she is joined by many others on her sojourn to the west. The "walkers" do not eat or sleep, if someone tries to stop them, they literally explode. Shana and her father follow in an RV as the first of the “shepherds.” The CDC is asked to intercede and the walkers become a polarizing political issue: they are accused of being terrorists, devil worshippers, and are a rallying point for right-wing, nationalism and hatred. The CDC is also dealing with virulent new disease, thought to be 100% fatal, with a long rate of incubation, that has begun to spread across the globe.

Wendig has created a memorable cast of characters, Shana, Nessie, a disgraced CDC scientist, an AI, a preacher (who loses his way), a white supremacist, an ex-female cop, an aging, closet-gay rock star, who all have roles to play to avoid human extinction. Lots of current issues: guns, racial hatred, abuse of power, fear, baiting/name-calling, nanobots, global warming, role of the government. Sadly, it seems all too plausible, too familiar and too terrifying in today's world. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 30 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Anyone who’s touched on Wendig’s oeuvre, let alone his lively social media presence, knows he’s a full-voiced political creature who’s less concerned with left and right than the chasm between right and wrong, and that impulse is fully on display here. Parsing the plot isn’t really critical—Wendig has stretched his considerable talents beyond the hyperkinetic horror that is his wheelhouse to deliver a story about survival that’s not just about you and me, but all of us, together. Wendig is clearly wrestling with some of the demons of our time, resulting in a story that is ambitious, bold, and worthy of attention.
afegit per Lemeritus | editaKirkus Review (Jul 2, 2019)
 
Wendig challenges readers with twists and revelations that probe issues of faith and free will while crafting a fast-paced narrative with deeply real characters. His politics are unabashed—characters include a populist president brought to power by neo-Nazis, as well as murderous religious zealots—but not simplistic, and he tackles many moral questions while eschewing easy answers. This career-defining epic deserves its inevitable comparisons to Stephen King’s The Stand, easily rising above the many recent novels of pandemic and societal collapse.
afegit per Lemeritus | editaPublishers Weekly (Mar 20, 2019)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (1 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Wendig, Chuckautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Hoffman, DominicNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Sands, XeNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Stevenson, David G.Cover artist & designerautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Turner, SusanDissenyadorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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A wilderness, in contrast with those areas where man and his works dominate the landscape, is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain. -The Winderness Act of 1964
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For Kevin Hearne, who is kindness and coolness personified.
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The woman who discovered the comet, Yumiko Sakamoto, age twenty-eight, was an amateur astronomer in Okayama Prefecture, in the town of Kurashiki. -Prelude
Last night's amateur astronomers got a treat in the form of clear skies, a new moon, and Comet Sakamoto -Chapter One, Part One
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Last night's amateur astronomers got a treat in the form of clear skies, a new moon, and Comet Sakamoto -Chapter One, Part One
THE WOMAN WHO DISCOVERED THE comet, Yumiko Sakamoto, age twenty-eight, was an amateur astronomer in Okayama Prefecture, in the town of Kurashiki...Yumiko Sakamoto was going to begin her new academic study the following October, but did not live long enough to see the chance. She died of a brain aneurysm the night the comet passed overhead.
Black swan events were therefore viewed as outliers—named as such from a statement made by the Roman poet Juvenal: “Rara avis in terris nigroque simillima cygno.” Or, roughly translated: “A rare bird, like a black swan.” His statement was understood throughout history as one meant to symbolize something that was impossible. Because black swans were believed not to exist. Except they did. Just as humankind often believed certain events or outcomes to be impossible—until they happened.
(Politicians were always keen to try to “bring back coal,” but you might as well try to bring back the buggy whip. Talking about coal was never about coal, though: It was always code for making promises to blue-collar America about their blue-collar ways of life.)
Dreams were not made on the internet; they were killed there. By mean, nasty little shits who were all looking to one-up each other.
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A decadent rock star. A deeply religious radio host. A disgraced scientist. And a teenage girl who may be the world's last hope. In the tradition of The Stand and Station Eleven comes a gripping saga that weaves an epic tapestry of humanity into an astonishing tale of survival. Shana wakes up one morning to discover her little sister in the grip of a strange malady. She appears to be sleepwalking. She cannot talk and cannot be woken up. And she is heading with inexorable determination to a destination that only she knows. But Shana and her sister are not alone. Soon they are joined by a flock of sleepwalkers from across America, on the same mysterious journey. And like Shana, there are other "shepherds" who follow the flock to protect their friends and family on the long dark road ahead. For on their journey, they will discover an America convulsed with terror and violence, where this apocalyptic epidemic proves less dangerous than the fear of it. As the rest of society collapses all around them--and an ultraviolent militia threatens to exterminate them--the fate of the sleepwalkers depends on unraveling the mystery behind the epidemic. The terrifying secret will either tear the nation apart--or bring the survivors together to remake a shattered world.

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