IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

The Iliad de Gareth Hinds
S'està carregant…

The Iliad (edició 2019)

de Gareth Hinds (Autor), Gareth Hinds (Il·lustrador)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
12717168,653 (3.8)7
In a companion volume to his award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey, the incomparable graphic novelist Gareth Hinds masterfully adapts Homer's classic wartime epic. More than three thousand years ago, two armies faced each other in an epic battle that rewrote history and came to be known as the Trojan War. The Iliad, Homer's legendary account of this nine-year ordeal, is considered the greatest war story of all time and one of the most important works of Western literature. In this stunning graphic novel adaptation -- a thoroughly researched and artfully rendered masterwork -- renowned illustrator Gareth Hinds captures all the grim glory of Homer's epic. Dynamic illustrations take readers directly to the plains of Troy, into the battle itself, and lay bare the complex emotions of the men, women, and gods whose struggles fueled the war and determined its outcome. This companion volume to Hinds's award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey features notes, maps, a cast of characters, and other tools to help readers understand all the action and drama of Homer's epic.… (més)
Membre:seppo21
Títol:The Iliad
Autors:Gareth Hinds (Autor)
Altres autors:Gareth Hinds (Il·lustrador)
Informació:Candlewick (2019), Edition: Illustrated, 272 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Window Sunroom 3

Detalls de l'obra

The Iliad: A Graphic Novel Adaption de Gareth Hinds

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 7 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 17 (següent | mostra-les totes)
(4.5/5) So I’ve never actually read The Iliad, but I’ve read a lot about it, and reading a graphic novelization is basically the same thing, right? Regardless, here’re some random thoughts on Harris’ visualization of the three-ish millennia old epic.

Perhaps the most surprising thing about the ‘epic’ is just how visceral it is. This is not bloodless dueling, Homer (or the Homeric bards, or whomever) go into surprisingly graphic detail about the injuries inflicted and suffered. People get stabbed, pierced, and hacked, their bodies are mutilated and their corpses desecrated. Compare with, say, a war movie from the 1950s or 60s, where someone might get a splash of blood suggesting they’d been shot, and nothing more unsettling. There are frequent references to, and scenes with, family members mourning over dead sons and husbands, comrades lamenting the deaths of their brothers-in-arms. In his author’s note at the end Hinds observes that “every war story is an anti-war story”, which meshes with my own thoughts. One cannot help but believe that somewhere in the poetic tradition, there was someone who had witnessed the violence of war firsthand.

(Though as a classics professor once pointed out – by the time of “Homer”, they seem to have forgotten how chariots were used, even if they retained a cultural memory of them. The warriors in The Iliad uses chariots basically to taxi between locations, dismounting to fight, rather than employing them as a cavalry unit.)

Someone (I forget who) once said that the definition of a ‘war’ is a conflict in which the adversaries have no relationship or personal grievances with one another, to distinguish war from, say, blood feuds or acts of vengeance. Going by this definition, the fighting in The Iliad’s Trojan War almost doesn’t quality – there seems to be an almost personal contest-of-wills behind every clash of spears, every slain man is seemingly known by name to his killer. IMHO this is more reflective of storytelling tradition than historicity – the bards and poets at the time didn’t think in terms of what we’d now call ‘battle scenes’, with large clashes of impersonal units. Much attention is paid to the capturing of armor, to making sure that bodies are recovered, even in the midst of battle. War was still fundamentally heroic, individualistic.

Speaking of heroes, Achilles is definitely the most interesting character in the story. He seems the most truly three-dimensional person, too, alternating between petty selfishness and grand heroism, motivated by everything from pride to glory to vengeance. Achilles has sort of low-key fascinated me because of his appearance in Hades – he straight-up tells Odysseus that death is terrible. As someone who personally things that death is massively romanticized in our culture, I’ve always been intrigued by the fact that the ancient Greeks (almost alone) depicted the afterlife as near-universally shitty. Achilles’ mourning over the death of Patroclus similarly is a wonderful act that de-romanticizes the glory of war, by reminding us that at the end of the day, it’s just a lot of people you love dying.

The role of the Gods is also interesting – they’re a lot more directly involved than I remembered. I also particularly like the storytelling mechanic of having the Gods speak to/inspire characters on both sides throughout the fighting. From a strict storytelling perspective, it’s a great device to literally anthropomorphize “movements of the mind”, to give form to psychodrama. Also – look up the concept of bicameralism in psychology. Julian Jayne speculated that up to the Bronze Age, human psychology was such that we actually hallucinated god-like voices that commanded us to take actions, and that introspection as we presently conceive it only developed when societies became too complex for the bicameral mind to handle. It’s almost certainly bunk (despite how cool it would be if it was true), but reading works like The Iliad (which Jaynes studied) you can see where he was coming from. Instead of changing their minds, characters often will be visited by one god or another, telling them to do things differently.

Overall, Hinds’ graphic novel feels like a worthy adaptation of an epic. By necessity he cuts quite a bit of content, like the Catalogue of Ships or the full description of the Shield of Achilles, but narratively it flows quite well. Recommended. (Also, it took me way too long to realize/remember that the Trojan Horse doesn’t appear in The Iliad, but The Aeneid).
( )
  pvoberstein | Dec 14, 2020 |
I don't know how many of you out there went to Sunday School as children, but I remember having to read these god-awful children's books with truly ugly art depicting bible tales. Watercolor, with bland-as-hell poses and expressions for everyone... all so worthless that I wished they had just done without the pictures altogether. Maybe the bland tales, too.

"But wait," you say, "This is supposed to be the Iliad! It's exciting and tragic and it has gods and heroes and that damn horse!"

Yeah, well, this is the book where even great tales go to die.

If you want to read the original, READ THE ORIGINAL. Or as in my case, the translation to the original. Go for the poetry one or the prose one. I don't care. It's better than this. Even the text manages to draw out the dull. And if you wanted a great comic portrayal, go watch that horse-dung of a movie that came out in the oughts. It really was comic. And at least it didn't have ALL THESE FOOTNOTES.

You know the old adage, a picture paints a thousand words? Well, the author ignores the great thousands of words and leaves them in the comic and ignores the possible brilliance of the art that could have replaced certain scenes. And then, instead of focusing on the really iconic scenes to great benefit, he gives a lot of space to the random dead that we can list for hours in the original text. I can kinda appreciate that in a "oh, cool, I can't believe he did that," kind of way, but in actuality, I was thinking, "oh, damn, that really, really could have been left out."

My boredom got bored.

Do not read. This is a public service announcement.

*apologies to the artist*

( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
*I WAS PROVIDED A PHYSICAL ARC FOR THE PURPOSE OF THIS REVIEW. THIS DOES NOT AFFECT MY OPINION*

Can I just really quick say how stunning the artwork in this book was? And I have an ARC, so that means that it isn't even colored in yet! Now, that would be a pretty sight to see.

If you—like me—have no clue what the Iliad actually is, this graphic novel is probably for you. I feel like, if you're just starting to learn about this story and everything going on, it'd probably be wiser to see it in pictures first so you can grasp for an idea of what's happening.

Gareth Hinds did a phenomenal job with the artwork, as I've already stated. But not only that, he also really captured the story. I was very confused in some parts, but that was mainly because it's a little hard to follow along when short speech bubbles are suddenly flipped to long ones. On top of that, I felt that it was a little difficult to know where to look. Some of the pages had two-page artwork, and I was a little confused at where to start on those too.

But other than that, I felt like the artwork really made up for the other things. All in all, I'd rate this Graphic Novel a solid 3/5 stars. ( )
  booking_belle | Nov 8, 2019 |
Ressenya escrita per a Crítics Matiners de LibraryThing .
I received a reviewer's copy of this book from the publisher through LibraryThing's Early Reviewers program.

Admittedly, I was a little disappointed to receive a black and white reviewer's copy of this book rather than the full-colored finished article. That said, even the absence of color did not detract from the artistry and clarity of this superb graphic novel.

Graphic novel adaptions of classic literature often have two major problems which lessen the enjoyment of one familiar with the original work. The first is that the story and dialogue are often greatly abridged or altered, an occasionally necessary evil. The second, particularly when black and white illustrations are implemented, is that often the characters are not differentiated enough, thus resulting in confusion as the reader mistakes one character for another.

I am happy to say that this particular adaption has neither of these common problems. Using a classic translation of the original work, the abridgement (if abridgement there has been) has been done so judiciously as make the reader feel as if they have indeed read the entire, unabridged work, and Mr. Hinds' ability to make each and every character visually distinct and unique leaves no room for confusion.

Though I was initially hesitant about reviewing a graphic novel adaption of one of my favorite works of classic literature, I can now say that this particular version has been very well done indeed, and I highly recommend it. ( )
1 vota hillaryrose7 | Aug 7, 2019 |
Ressenya escrita per a Crítics Matiners de LibraryThing .
Hinds put in a lot of effort and it shows: not only the visual renderings, but the editing of the story. The Trojan War is literally a cast of tens of thousands, multiple armies against armies over years and years. Already Homer's Iliad cuts this down to just the last year of the conflict, and still his poem is full of names and allegiances, suspicions and feints, sorties and retreats. From this material, Hinds elects to hone the story further to battles between champions on either side, and just as importantly, to the internecine squabbling among the Achaeans (Greeks): Agememnon and Achilles. No wonder the war lasted 10 years.

Alongside this plays out another dimension to the war: the influence of immortals using these champions as pawns in their own quarrels. The machinations of the gods can be taken literally or as allegory, perhaps both. Hinds offers up a thoughtful distillation, allowing us to reflect upon these key dynamics: armies, squabbles, extra-rational dynamics at play, instead of (only) getting lost in the detail.

The result, whatever fidelity to Homer's original, however rich in its abbreviation, never grabbed me. I think of it now as a sophisticated precis, similar to Charles Lamb's various treatments of Shakespeare plays. That said, it's the summary I want on my shelves (well, this one and Shanower's).

//

The full supplement of maps and diagrams, notes and essays are welcome but need not be read to enjoy the work.

My ARC presented with a greyscale interior / colour cover; the final product includes a full-colour interior. (I learned recently that Shanower's multi-part graphic adaptation of the Iliad, interiors originally in greyscale, is recently reissued in full colour.) Several reviewers suggest Hinds's use of colour is not merely decorative but key to the sense of the book, characters readily identified, dramatic effect heightened. ( )
  elenchus | May 31, 2019 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 17 (següent | mostra-les totes)

És una adaptació de

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
For Alison, with all my love. You inspire my greatest endeavors.
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
This is not the story of the Trojan War. [Prologue]
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

In a companion volume to his award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey, the incomparable graphic novelist Gareth Hinds masterfully adapts Homer's classic wartime epic. More than three thousand years ago, two armies faced each other in an epic battle that rewrote history and came to be known as the Trojan War. The Iliad, Homer's legendary account of this nine-year ordeal, is considered the greatest war story of all time and one of the most important works of Western literature. In this stunning graphic novel adaptation -- a thoroughly researched and artfully rendered masterwork -- renowned illustrator Gareth Hinds captures all the grim glory of Homer's epic. Dynamic illustrations take readers directly to the plains of Troy, into the battle itself, and lay bare the complex emotions of the men, women, and gods whose struggles fueled the war and determined its outcome. This companion volume to Hinds's award-winning adaptation of The Odyssey features notes, maps, a cast of characters, and other tools to help readers understand all the action and drama of Homer's epic.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Autor amb llibres seus als Crítics Matiners de LibraryThing

El llibre de Gareth Hinds The Iliad estava disponible a LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Dóna't d'alta per obtenir una còpia prèvia a canvi d'una ressenya.

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.8)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3 5
3.5 1
4 10
4.5 2
5 3

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 160,651,269 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible