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All the Greys on Greene Street

de Laura Tucker

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905239,776 (3.75)No n'hi ha cap
"A dazzling debut novel about resilience, courage, home and family."--Rebecca Stead, Newbery Award-winning author of When You Reach Me SoHo, 1981. Twelve-year-old Olympia is an artist--and in her neighborhood, that's normal. Her dad and his business partner Apollo bring antique paintings back to life, while her mother makes intricate sculptures in a corner of their loft, leaving Ollie to roam the streets of New York with her best friends Richard and Alex, drawing everything that catches her eye. Then everything falls apart. Ollie's dad disappears in the middle of the night, leaving her only a cryptic note and instructions to destroy it. Her mom has gone to bed, and she's not getting up. Apollo is hiding something, Alex is acting strange, and Richard has questions about the mysterious stranger he saw outside. And someone keeps calling, looking for a missing piece of art. . . . Olympia knows her dad is the key--but first, she has to find him, and time is running out. Lauded by critics in five starred reviews, All the Greys on Greene Street has been called "a remarkable debut" and "a triumph."… (més)
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Es mostren totes 5
Rebecca Stead blurbed this book, and I understand why. There’s a distinct When You Reach Me flavor to All the Greys on Greene Street - to its benefit, I think. WYRM is, at the end of the day, a fantasy book, and ATGOGS is not, but there is something magical about Ollie’s story and the way Tucker writes it. And boy, can Tucker write. She conveys the feeling of looking at art, at creating it. She plays with tense. She creates characters so believable they threaten to leap off the page. Her style is pitch-perfect and clear, conveying complicated ideas with seeming ease.

From the publisher’s description, I was expecting a mystery, a sort of Chasing Vermeer-style romp, but this book is much more about character than it is about adventure. In fact, there’s not much sleuthing at all. Instead, there’s Ollie, who remains sympathetic even when she’s being unreasonable, and the friends who surround her. My favorite thing about this book was how kind everyone was, and how kindly the narrative treated them. Everyone around Ollie is passionate about something. Alex loves stunts; Richard loves monsters. Tucker treats both of these interests with respect, painting the boys as people with complex inner lives. Similarly, Ollie is a true artist who sees the world in fascinating ways. Her art is real art; Tucker doesn’t patronize her or diminish her passion just because she’s a child, and neither does anyone else in the book. This book is fairly dripping with compassion. Ollie cares for these people, and they care for her, even if they don’t always see eye to eye. In one especially lovely scene, Alex and Ollie wordlessly reconcile while running through a forest on a beach. It’s a joy to read.

Finally, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that this book is largely about living with a parent who has depression. Tucker handles this issue with nuance. Ollie is, rightfully, hurt and confused when her mother goes to bed and refuses to get up. Those feelings are real, and as with everything else in the book, Tucker does not shy away from or diminish them just because her protagonist - and her audience - is young. At the same time, she does not demonize Ollie’s mother. The ending is not neat; it would not make sense if it were, because mental illness can’t just be solved over the course of one book. But this is, by the end, a positive book, one about the complicated joy of creating and of loving. ( )
  livmae | Jul 17, 2020 |
This haunting story concerns Ollie a girl who's mother is bed ridden by severe depression after her father leaves & she is trying to cope without any parenting. Her best friends try to help her out but finally stop keeping her secret. The story is lovely & tragic & heartbreakingly hopeful. ( )
  Rachael_SJSU | Jul 11, 2020 |
Olympia’s (Ollie) parents are artists. They live in a loft in Soho. Olympia is an artists’ kid; she has free reign of the studio and works on sketches for herself and monster sketches for her friend Richard. Her father disappeared suddenly, presumably with “Vouley Vou,” a French woman named Clothilde who is also in the art business. Shortly after he took off, Olympia’s mother confines herself to bed, clearly in a depressed state. Olympia is pretty much on her own but afraid to tell any adults what is going on because last time her mother ended up in the hospital. The adults who would possibly know how to reach her father—business partner and artist Apollo; and Linda, Alex’s mother—don’t appear to be helpful in that regard. Then Olympia comes across a business card slipped in the loft door jamb, from an art counterfeiter. Is her father in trouble? And can she get him to help her mother? The prose goes at a measured pace, observant of the little moments, seen through the observant eyes of an artist. Very atmospheric of NYC in the 80s. ( )
  Salsabrarian | Mar 1, 2020 |
Olympia lives with her artist parents in a loft in SoHo in 1981, but her father has disappeared to France with another woman and a work of art he was supposed to be restoring, and her mother has gone to bed and won't get up, either to make art or to do any "care and feeding," so Olympia is on her own. There are responsible grown-ups in her life who would help if she asked - her dad's art partner Apollo, her mom's former agent Joyce, her friend Richard's mom, her friend Alex's mom - but she's afraid of what will happen, and hopes that her dad will return or her mom will get up on her own.

Quotes

"We have to work hard to learn the things we know." (Ollie's mom, 24)

"I can't stop wondering if it's possible to make something beautiful out of something awful."
"A lot of people would say that's exactly what art is." (Ollie and Apollo, 53)

...she was beautiful. Not pretty like a movie star, but the kind of beautiful that comes from never thinking anything mean, even if it's funny. (64)

I couldn't always tell what I was feeling anymore. (109)

What happens to a person who has to make things, when they don't want to make things anymore? (116)

"If the point of the mystery isn't to solve the mystery, then what is?"
"The mystery, my friend, provides an opportunity for the hero to find out who who is. Who she is." (Alex and Apollo, 141) ( )
  JennyArch | Nov 20, 2019 |
This story is well written, and I loved how well the characters passions and personalities came across. This story is unlike anything I’ve read, and it’s mysterious and vivid descriptions easily held my attention.

I enjoyed reading this, but is definitely has a darker tone than I am comfortable recommending to children, and even some teens. There’s a lot of mention of abuse and neglect, along with themes of mental illness, some crime, and starvation. It is something that needs some context and even parental guidance for most audiences, and could even cause problems for some readers. The pacing was also spotty, and the story would pick up only to lag again, coupled with the dark theme, it was difficult to read this more than a chapter or two at a time, despite the fact that most MG books tend to be easier for me to finish quickly.

I liked that this book deals with difficult topics, but I’m not sure I’d recommend most children read something that’s so…heavy, by themselves, or without some guidance. I did like that there were resources at the end about mental illness and mental health and some numbers for those in need…but my worry is, what if something triggers a reader, and they end up needing help but not ever finishing the story? With something like this, it’s hard to know if reading this would help, or harm some readers, which is always the problem with heavy topics, but as MG-teen it’s a sensitive time, and hard to know how they would respond.
  Shadow494 | May 30, 2019 |
Es mostren totes 5
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No n'hi ha cap

"A dazzling debut novel about resilience, courage, home and family."--Rebecca Stead, Newbery Award-winning author of When You Reach Me SoHo, 1981. Twelve-year-old Olympia is an artist--and in her neighborhood, that's normal. Her dad and his business partner Apollo bring antique paintings back to life, while her mother makes intricate sculptures in a corner of their loft, leaving Ollie to roam the streets of New York with her best friends Richard and Alex, drawing everything that catches her eye. Then everything falls apart. Ollie's dad disappears in the middle of the night, leaving her only a cryptic note and instructions to destroy it. Her mom has gone to bed, and she's not getting up. Apollo is hiding something, Alex is acting strange, and Richard has questions about the mysterious stranger he saw outside. And someone keeps calling, looking for a missing piece of art. . . . Olympia knows her dad is the key--but first, she has to find him, and time is running out. Lauded by critics in five starred reviews, All the Greys on Greene Street has been called "a remarkable debut" and "a triumph."

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Mitjana: (3.75)
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