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The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill…
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The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters: A Novel (2019 original; edició 2019)

de Balli Kaur Jaswal (Autor)

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2241094,370 (3.75)13
"The British-born Punjabi Shergill sisters--Rajni, Jezmeen, and Shirina--were never close and barely got along growing up, and now as adults, have grown even further apart. Rajni, a school principal is a stickler for order. Jezmeen, a thirty-year-old struggling actress, fears her big break may never come. Shirina, the peacemaking "good" sister married into wealth and enjoys a picture-perfect life. On her deathbed, their mother voices one last wish: that her daughters will make a pilgrimage together to the Golden Temple in Amritsar to carry out her final rites. After a trip to India with her mother long ago, Rajni vowed never to return. But she's always been a dutiful daughter, and cannot, even now, refuse her mother's request. Jezmeen has just been publicly fired from her television job, so the trip to India is a welcome break to help her pick up the pieces of her broken career. Shirina's in-laws are pushing her to make a pivotal decision about her married life; time away will help her decide whether to meekly obey, or to bravely stand up for herself for the first time. Arriving in India, these sisters will make unexpected discoveries about themselves, their mother, and their lives--and learn the real story behind the trip Rajni took with their Mother long ago--a momentous journey that resulted in Mum never being able to return to India again."-- The British-born Punjabi Shergill sisters-- Rajni, Jezmeen, and Shirina-- were never close and barely got along growing up. As adults, they've grown even further apart. Rajni, a school principal is a stickler for order. Jezmeen, a struggling actress, fears her big break may never come. Shirina, the peacemaking "good" sister married into wealth and enjoys a picture-perfect life. On her deathbed, their mother voices one last wish: that her daughters will make a pilgrimage together to the Golden Temple in Amritsar to carry out her final rites. Arriving in India, these sisters will make unexpected discoveries about themselves, their mother, and their lives. -- adapted from jacket.… (més)
Membre:jcbrannen
Títol:The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters: A Novel
Autors:Balli Kaur Jaswal (Autor)
Informació:William Morrow (2019), Edition: 1st, 320 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters de Balli Kaur Jaswal (2019)

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» Mira també 13 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 10 (següent | mostra-les totes)
After reading Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows and really enjoying it, I was so excited to receive the ARC for this one. This book turned out to be quite different from what I was expecting but it was nevertheless, a very interesting read.

Rajni is the eldest sister, a school principal who likes rules and everything to be in an orderly fashion. However, she was not always like this and things that happened in her past completely changed her attitude and now when things are again uncertain in her life, she is not sure how to handle everything. Jezmeen is a struggling actress who’s just lost her job and gone infamously viral. She also has always been a rebel and resists every attempt by Rajni to follow their pilgrimage schedule and resents her sister for being so strict. Shirina has always tried to be the perfect daughter but felt too invisible in her own home and being scared of any confrontations has left her as the person who always adjusts and makes sure everyone else is happy. I could relate to some parts of each of these sisters and it made the reading experience quite surreal - sometimes nostalgic and sometimes even uncomfortable.

The writing is as usual very engaging. The author uses the stories of these three sisters to give us a picture of immigrant life in Britain, the clash of cultures between traditional parents and their British born kids and sometimes, even the second generation immigrant kids. Through the trip that the characters take, we see a different view of India too - how the noise and crowds can sometimes feel overwhelming; even after so much development, how the sexism and misogyny is so ingrained that it manifests in everyday little things; how female foeticide in parts of India is still rampant and sometimes, these ideas don’t disappear just because someone has immigrated to a more modern country. The author also manages to give us a nuanced portrait of the relationship between three sisters - who were not close while growing up and even held resentments towards each other, but being in close proximity after the death of their mother forces them to acknowledge their issues and maybe pave the way for a better relationship going forward. It’s also great to see them have each other’s back despite any lingering issues.

This book is a very interesting portrayal of family dynamics and sisterhood, traditional vs modern thinking and how it affects our everyday life. It’s a very honest picture of three sister’s lives told with drama, humor and mystery which makes for a fascinating read. I would definitely recommend this one if you enjoyed the author’s previous book and are interested in depictions of the myriad of issues that women face in everyday life. ( )
  ksahitya1987 | Aug 20, 2021 |
From the cover and synopsis I was slightly concerned this would be a bit Chiklit. I need not have worried, it has more to it than that. When their mother dies and leaves them a letter sending them on pilgrimage to India to scatter her ashes, the Shergill sisters start a journey that will have an impact on the rest of their lives. They each have different worries and concerns that they are not keen on sharing and, at first, the pilgrimage is not achieving their mother's aim of bringing the three together. They are quite different personalities and that comes across very well. Yet when the chips are down, they pull together and they do form a bond as adults that is not based purely on shared memory and upbringing.
While I'm not of Indian descent, I found the mixture of friction and bonding felt very real to me. My brother and I revert to type when we're together for too long ( and 8 days would most definitely be too long!) me the bossy older sister, him the laid back one who floats along. But we both know that if the chips were down we'd be there. That underlying tone really came through towards the end, when they do actually pull together. They may not complete the pilgrimage as intended in a physical sense, but they do achieve an understanding and resolution in their relationship that will stand them in good stead for the future. And it is true that after the death of a parent you do need to renegotiate a lot of relationships, particularly with family, once the point of reference has been removed.
While this was a book about women it was a lot deeper than the chicklit appearance it gives off. ( )
  Helenliz | Aug 11, 2020 |
I picked this up not knowing what to expect but hoping for something on the lighter end of fiction that didn’t lean in to being Chick Lit™. I was pleasantly surprised when Jaswal delivered exactly that without shying away from darker topics. I breezed through it and was pretty charmed.

I’m also impressed, because balancing “light summer-read tone” and “Indian adventure for Indians and non-Indians alike” with “commentary on what it means to be part of the Indian diaspora” and “pretty pointed look at feminist issues in Indian culture” is tricky enough, and then Jaswal threw in a heartwarming story of family reconnecting and women changing for the better, with thoroughly believable and complicated characters, on top of that.

Like, seriously, the way these women are only who they are because of their childhoods and upbringing, and the way they change and push each other to do so, and how all that is also couched in the generations they belong to is … I’m not sure I’ve seen that depth in a book that reads this lightly. She even gives side characters enough realness to push them beyond the stereotypes they could have been. Everyone’s got their own problems, all different from each others’ and what you might expect, and … yeah. Nicely done.

So, things you’ll get in this book: sniping and miscommunication and stubbornness; Indian and specifically Sikh set pieces since the sisters are supposed to be volunteering at temples a lot; moments like the hotel that cooks nothing on its menu and the taxi driver who quotes Castaway that are a little goofy but hey, these things happen; family history that pokes through bit by bit until you get a clear picture; a real sense of what there is to love and to not-love about India; moments of epiphany and sisterly heroism; relatable characters—but also leering men, protest marches, the viciousness of social media and conservative relatives, the desire to be Indian but not too Indian, people who deal with grief and shock and fear badly, nasty mothers-in-law, and men who can’t be bothered to help around the house, among the other things I mention below.

Basically, if you’re in the mood I was, wanting something light but not too light, diversity and feminism without the book being Diverse And Feminist, something to cozy up with and tear through, something to make you laugh and also tear up a little, something to take you out of yourself and show you a bit of the world, I don’t think this book’s going to disappoint much at all. Didn’t quite make it to an 8 for me, because some of the hijinks and resolutions felt a bit contrived for my liking, but … ‘tis the genre and the title, after all.

To bear in mind: This book is heavily concerned with feminist issues and issues of the Indian diaspora, so expect mention of or plot points relating to misogyny, institutional misogyny, sexual harassment, rape, honour killings, forced abortions, domestic abuse, gaslighting, culture clashes, and anti-Indian slurs, all presented as bad things and never getting visceral. Also contains cancer, alcoholism, mental illness, suicide, and fish murder. If you really, really can’t handle a minor relationship with a 15 year-ish age gap, this is not for you.

7.5/10 ( )
  NinjaMuse | Jul 26, 2020 |
When their mother dies, she leaves an itinerary for an Indian pilgrimage for them to follow which leads to discoveries and a bond none of them thought they would recapture.
  4leschats | Jul 15, 2020 |
I felt like the title was a bit of a misnomer, not so much an adventure as a meandering through life's sometimes unfair lessons. While not especially close as grown ups, sisters Rajni, Shirini and Jezmeen undertake a trip to India at their deceased mother's behest. The letter she leaves detailing their journey seems to be full of unreachable hope about the closeness the three will come to find. All are hiding parts of their lives from each other. Add in the difficulty of traveling as women in India and the story moves along. The end was really the best, as the three began to take notice of each other again, instead of hiding behind their other personas. ( )
  ethel55 | May 22, 2020 |
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"The British-born Punjabi Shergill sisters--Rajni, Jezmeen, and Shirina--were never close and barely got along growing up, and now as adults, have grown even further apart. Rajni, a school principal is a stickler for order. Jezmeen, a thirty-year-old struggling actress, fears her big break may never come. Shirina, the peacemaking "good" sister married into wealth and enjoys a picture-perfect life. On her deathbed, their mother voices one last wish: that her daughters will make a pilgrimage together to the Golden Temple in Amritsar to carry out her final rites. After a trip to India with her mother long ago, Rajni vowed never to return. But she's always been a dutiful daughter, and cannot, even now, refuse her mother's request. Jezmeen has just been publicly fired from her television job, so the trip to India is a welcome break to help her pick up the pieces of her broken career. Shirina's in-laws are pushing her to make a pivotal decision about her married life; time away will help her decide whether to meekly obey, or to bravely stand up for herself for the first time. Arriving in India, these sisters will make unexpected discoveries about themselves, their mother, and their lives--and learn the real story behind the trip Rajni took with their Mother long ago--a momentous journey that resulted in Mum never being able to return to India again."-- The British-born Punjabi Shergill sisters-- Rajni, Jezmeen, and Shirina-- were never close and barely got along growing up. As adults, they've grown even further apart. Rajni, a school principal is a stickler for order. Jezmeen, a struggling actress, fears her big break may never come. Shirina, the peacemaking "good" sister married into wealth and enjoys a picture-perfect life. On her deathbed, their mother voices one last wish: that her daughters will make a pilgrimage together to the Golden Temple in Amritsar to carry out her final rites. Arriving in India, these sisters will make unexpected discoveries about themselves, their mother, and their lives. -- adapted from jacket.

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Descripció del llibre
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Melvil Decimal System (DDC)

823.92 — Literature English English fiction Modern Period 21st Century

LCC (Classificació de la Biblioteca del Congrés dels EUA)

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Mitjana: (3.75)
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