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The City We Became: A Novel (The Great…
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The City We Became: A Novel (The Great Cities Trilogy, 1) (edició 2020)

de N. K. Jemisin (Autor)

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1,639738,376 (3.99)89
"Five New Yorkers must come together in order to save their city from destruction in the first book of a stunning new series by Hugo award-winning and NYT bestselling author N. K. Jemisin. Every great city has a soul. Some are ancient as myths, and others are as new and destructive as children. New York? She's got six. When a young man crosses the bridge into New York City, something changes. He doesn't remember who he is, where he's from, or even his own name. But he can feel the pulse of the city, can see its history, can access its magic. And he's not the only one. All across the boroughs, strange things are happening. Something is threatening to destroy the city and her six newborn avatars unless they can come together and stop it once and for all"--… (més)
Membre:tank1010
Títol:The City We Became: A Novel (The Great Cities Trilogy, 1)
Autors:N. K. Jemisin (Autor)
Informació:Orbit (2020), Edition: 1st, 448 pages
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The City We Became de N. K. Jemisin

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» Mira també 89 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 71 (següent | mostra-les totes)
I am not from the U.S. and although I do read and consume a lot of media and lots of it is set in New York this book is so quintessentially the city that I felt extremely lost all the way, from beggining to end. That said, it's an interesting book and I do like this many worlds interpretation of the whole thing. ( )
  Nannus | Jan 17, 2022 |
This book blew my mind both in concept and in execution. I wish I could listen in on some New Yorkers discussing it because I am certain they would have gotten even more out of it than I did. ( )
  KimZoot | Jan 2, 2022 |
This is a very well written book, but it was completely exhausting. As a love letter to New York, I suspect it works for people who have any clue about the city; as it was I never really got in to it. And it is in that specific cross-over between horror and science fiction that really bothers me, which didn't help for staying focused.

I powered on through to find out how the story resolved, only to get to the end and discover it is book one of a trilogy. ( )
  fred_mouse | Dec 27, 2021 |
I enjoyed Jemisin's previous fantasy trilogy, The Broken Earth, a lot, particularly its first volume. Despite being fantasy, I felt it had the doubling effect that for me makes the best science fiction: it had a rigorously extrapolated secondary world, but it was also a metaphor for our world. This new novel is, as far as I know, the first book by Jemisin that falls into the Mendlesohn category of "intrusion fantasy" rather than "immersive fantasy," and perhaps for that reason, I found the commentary much less interesting. The basic premise is that when they reach certain levels of complexity, cities are "born" and acquire living avatars, but there are dark forces out there willing to destroy cities to stop this from happening. New York City is undergoing that process during the course of this novel, but because it has multiple boroughs, it has multiple avatars, who must find each other and learn to work together.

I had a number of problems with the book. It drags. As a friend of mine also pointed out, the reader understands what its going on by the end of the prologue, but it takes the characters over four hundred pages to figure it out for themselves, and to undertake the pretty mundane task of finding one another. And while the orogenes in The Broken Earth were potent metaphors for various aspects of chattel slavery, I felt like The City We Became didn't really engage with the potential complexities of its premise. The city avatars are basically all good, and the city is coming to life is a good thing, and they are a charming team of ethnically diverse heroes; the bad guys are all evil racists. But surely cities—and here my thoughts are influenced by James Scott's Seeing Like a State—are born of the push and pull between complexity and simplification. Cities are diverse places, but they are also always trying to contain and stamp out and systematize their own diversity in order to make it legible and therefore controllable. Without this, I would argue, you have no city. A city planner wants things in neat grids, and is willing to smash those who gets in their way; an American city in particular, is born of stolen land. I feel like some of this is touched on vaguely, but not really dealt with. I feel like there's another version of this book that's about cities coming to life in all their mess just being a thing that is, rather than a thing that's good, and I think that book is probably more interesting than this one.

This is made worse by the fact that the social commentary in The City We Became ranges from the obvious to the banal. It felt to me like it was written by Twitter: the villain is clearly a Karen, and there are definite echoes of the Chris Cooper birdwatching incident (though that actually happened after the book was written). Jemisin's book doesn't have anything new or interesting to say about those topics; it's pretty much all the exact same way you would get people snarkily commenting on it online. There's a particularly risible subplot about evil bro fascist racist progressive artists which completely failed to convince me that its villains were real people; again, it felt like an online stereotype of a category of person I'm not completely convinced actually exists. On top of that, this subplot is resolved stupidly easy; basically someone tweets "help out our art gallery," and it's all taken care of in a couple paragraphs.

Anyway, overall I found this pretty disappointing considering the strength of Jemisin's other work, and I imagine I will only read future installments if "forced" to do so by them being Hugo finalists in future years.
  Stevil2001 | Dec 18, 2021 |
When I started reading this book I had a few moments of sideways déja vu. Jemison’s story begins as the unexpecting Manny becomes an embodied avatar of New York (followed shortly thereafter by manifestations of the other boroughs), and I was getting serious flashbacks to the beginning of Kate Griffin’s Matthew Swift series, wherein Matthew becomes a host to the Electric Blue Angels and then takes on the title of Midnight Mayor of London (with all its power and responsibilities). There are definitely themes that run throughout both books (treading similar conversations about a city’s power, its magical citizens, and having unexpected power and responsibility thrust upon the protagonists in defense of said City), but like the differences between the cities of New York and London, Jemisin’s book stands apart as its own citified entity. I absolutely loved Griffin’s take on manifesting magical London (as much as I love the city itself), so Jemison’s version of magical urbanity was like visiting and falling in love with the magic of a new and equally interesting city. This is only the first book in a planned trilogy, and it’s clear that the Cthulu-inspired antagonist isn’t nearly done yet, so I am very much looking forward to seeing where this story goes! ( )
  JaimieRiella | Nov 11, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 71 (següent | mostra-les totes)
The City We Became is an intensely political work of speculative fiction charting two distinct storylines, with both layers of the novel's narrative producing unexpected insights and parallels as they are superimposed atop one another. By blending concepts as diverse as the true nature of social constructs, what it takes for fictional stories to become “real,” and some of the more bewildering implications of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum physics, Jemisin manages to explore hidden dimensions of social existence and racism. In so doing, she dramatizes the cues and subtexts that underlie even the most outwardly mundane of everyday interactions into an intensely compelling science fiction story.... Initially straining to maintain and introduce its large cast of characters, The City We Became eventually becomes an allegory for the ways in which all types of bigotry quite literally “infect” the societies and subcultures they target. The novel is in part an over-the-top adventure story whose characters engage in literal rap battles with two-dimensional spider-people, fight off a giant underground worm composed of discarded subway cars, and momentarily drive off parasitic alien sea anemones by throwing money at the problem until it goes away. However, behind all of that, this is also a novel about the horrifyingly absurd nature of bigotry, and the extent to which people are forced to accept as facts things that should not be true, but somehow are.
afegit per Lemeritus | editaStrange Horizons, Eric Hendel (Sep 14, 2020)
 
IN 2018, N. K. Jemisin made genre history as the first author to win three consecutive Hugo Awards... Jemisin’s well-earned triumph was particularly notable given the fact that 2013 had seen the emergence of right-wing groups of predominantly white men, known as the “Sad Puppies” and “Rabid Puppies,” who until 2017 attempted to flood the Hugo nomination system with blocs of authors and texts they deemed appropriate. In light of the failure of this extended reactionary tantrum, Jemisin didn’t just win — her victories announced that science fiction and fantasy were, as she put it in her acceptance speech, “the aspirational drive of the zeitgeist” .... it’s difficult, now, to avoid the temptation to retroactively read into the novel the historic events that are transforming New York, along with so many other United States and global cities. The language of infestation, infection, and contagion seeps into Jemisin’s description of the Enemy’s invasion of New York, illuminating with terrifying insight the physical ecosystems by which a pathogen spreads through the city .... The City We Became estranges us from the everyday operations of power so that we can, with new clarity, see how it works and how it can be unraveled and remade; like her Hugo acceptance speech, the novel declares that the stakes of social power, the significance of asserting that the world belongs to the marginalized, is nothing less than epic.
 
The basic premise, which was previewed in Jemisin’s 2016 story “The City Born Great”, is this: each great city reaches a point in its history when it literally comes alive and is embodied in an avatar who might otherwise seem an ordinary, undistinguished citizen. When this happens, ancient eldritch forces try to use this moment of instability to invade and gain a foothold in our world.... As a standalone narrative, The City We Became offers only a degree of closure in a rather abrupt ending, as Jemisin sets the stage for the epic struggles we can expect in subsequent volumes. As the inaugural volume of what promises to be a wildly original fantasy trilogy, quite unlike anything else Jemisin has written, it completely takes command of the very notion of urban fantasy, and it leaves us exactly where we need to be – wanting the next volume now.
afegit per Lemeritus | editaLocus, Gary K. Wolfe (Apr 11, 2020)
 
I’ve not read another book like this in years. Jemisin takes a concept that can be abstracted to the simplest of questions (What if cities were alive?) and wraps an adventure around it. That adventure takes center stage in the many scenes that read more like a superhero movie than a fantasy novel, such as when a towering Lovecraftian tentacle bursts from the river to destroy the Williamsburg Bridge. However, Jemisin’s most beautiful passages deliver attentive descriptions of New York’s melting pot of people. Her characters’ life experiences—racial, sexual, financial—bring perspectives that are deeply important to and often missing from contemporary literature, particularly in the fantasy genre.
afegit per Lemeritus | editaBookPage, Chris Pickens (Apr 1, 2020)
 
The City We Became is strange to read right now in a way that Jemisin — the only person ever to win the prestigious Hugo Award three years in a row — could not possibly have predicted. The infection in her fantasy New York City is a metaphor for colonialism and bigotry and white nationalism. Meanwhile, the real New York City, where I live, has become the center of America’s coronavirus pandemic, and the literal infection here is casting existing bigotry and white nationalism into ever-sharper relief. At times, it does feel as though coronavirus is threatening everything that makes New York a living, breathing, vital organism, and as though it will leave the city nothing but a husk of itself.... The City We Became is not a book about how New York falls apart. It’s a love letter to the city’s resilience, and to all the ways it overcomes hatred to rise up stronger than it was before. And by extension, it’s about the rest of us, and the ways in which we must all work together to protect and support one another. It will give you faith that New York can come back to itself again — and so can all the rest of us, too.
afegit per Lemeritus | editaVox, Constance Grady (Mar 30, 2020)
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (1 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
N. K. Jemisinautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
ArcangelAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Miles, RobinNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Panepinto, LaurenCover designer, mapmakerautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

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"One belongs to New York instantly, one belongs to it as much in five minutes as in five years."
--Thomas Wolfe
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I sing the city.

Fucking city. I stand on the rooftop of a building I don't live in and spread my arms and tighten my middle and yell nonsense ululations at the construction site that blocks my view. I'm really singing to the cityscape beyond. The city'll figure it out.
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All he uses his mouth for is smoking, drinking coffee, and talking. Shame; it’s a nice mouth otherwise. -Page 2
It isn’t that I’m not listening. I just don’t give a shit. -Page 3
The Woman is well dressed and clean, but there is a high, manic gleam in her gaze, and her bright, cheerful voice sounds false. No one is ever that happy. She’s clearly Not From Around Here. Maybe she’s an immigrant, too—legal, of course. Maybe she’s a Canadian who has been driven mad by the cold and socialized medicine. -Page 101
Jess watches Yijing go, then shakes her head and cocks an eyebrow skeptically at Bronca’s posture. “Tell me you aren’t sulking. You’re like sixty.” “Sulking is petulant, pointless anger. Mine is righteous.” And she’s actually nearly seventy, but nobody needs to be reminded of that. -Page 117
Innocence is nothing but a ceremony, after all. So strange that you people venerate it the way you do. What other world celebrates not knowing anything about how life really works?” A soft laugh-sigh. “How your species managed to get this far, I will never know.” -Page 119
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"Five New Yorkers must come together in order to save their city from destruction in the first book of a stunning new series by Hugo award-winning and NYT bestselling author N. K. Jemisin. Every great city has a soul. Some are ancient as myths, and others are as new and destructive as children. New York? She's got six. When a young man crosses the bridge into New York City, something changes. He doesn't remember who he is, where he's from, or even his own name. But he can feel the pulse of the city, can see its history, can access its magic. And he's not the only one. All across the boroughs, strange things are happening. Something is threatening to destroy the city and her six newborn avatars unless they can come together and stop it once and for all"--

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