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Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a…
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Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World (edició 2021)

de David Epstein (Autor)

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8212420,350 (4.1)8
"David Epstein manages to make me thoroughly enjoy the experience of being told that everything I thought about something was wrong. I loved Range." Malcolm Gladwell, bestselling author of Outliers.Range is the ground-breaking and exhilarating New York Times bestselling exploration into how to be successful in the 21st Century, from David Epstein the acclaimed author of The Sports Gene.What if everything you have been taught about how to succeed in life was wrong? From the '10,000 hours rule' to the power of Tiger parenting, we have been taught that success in any field requires early specialization and many hours of deliberate practice. And, worse, that if you dabble or delay, you'll never catch up with those who got a head start. This is completely wrong.In this landmark book, David Epstein shows that the way to excel is by sampling widely, gaining a breadth of experiences, taking detours, experimenting relentlessly, juggling many interests - in other words, by developing range.Studying the world's most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors, and scientists Epstein discovered that in most fields - especially those that are complex and unpredictable - generalists, not specialists, are primed to excel. They are also more creative, more agile, and able to make connections their more specialized peers can't see. Range proves that by spreading your knowledge across multiple domains is the key to success rather than deepening their knowledge in a single area. Provocative, rigorous, and engrossing, Range explains how to maintain the benefits of breadth, diverse experience and interdisciplinary thinking in a world that increasingly demands, hyper-specialization.PRAISE FOR RANGE"I want to give Range to any kid who is being forced to take violin lessons-but really wants to learn the drums; to any programmer who secretly dreams of becoming a psychologist; to everyone who wants humans to thrive in an age of robots. Range is full of surprises and hope, a 21st century survival guide." Amanda Ripley, author of The Smartest Kids in the World. "An assiduously researched and accessible argument for being a jack of all trades." O Magazine, Best Nonfiction Books Coming in 2019 "Brilliant, timely, and utterly impossible to put down. If you care about improving skill, innovation, and performance, you need to read this book." Daniel Coyle, author of The Culture Code and The Talent Code "A fresh, brisk look at creativity, learning, and the meaning of achievement." Kirkus Reviews "It's a joy to spend hours in the company of a writer as gifted as David Epstein. And the joy is all the greater when that writer shares so much crucial and revelatory information about performance, success, and education." Susan Cain, author of Quiet… (més)
Membre:kayhag5
Títol:Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World
Autors:David Epstein (Autor)
Informació:Riverhead Books (2021), 368 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
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Etiquetes:B40

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Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World de David Epstein

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The central hypothesis of Range is that people who have diverse experiences with problem-solving in many domains tend to solve problems more effectively in any one domain. Exposure to a range of experiences, rather than hyper-focusing on a single domain of expertise, leads to faster, deeper, and more transferrable learning in most domains. The book charts this path mostly through socially valued achievements: sports, music, technological invention, and scientific discovery.

The author divides the world into "kind" and "wicked" learning environments. Kind environments are highly structured (and tend to be contrived or designed) and present consistent feedback. Wicked learning environments are the opposite. These are the recurring themes that situate the biographical narratives that make up most of the chapters. Nearly every lesson is presented through a biographical slice. It does a good job of dispelling the sense of the mythic people in the western canon as being somehow predisposed as such due to some intrinsic property the happened to have.

Reading this pop social science as a learning scientist interested in the philosophy of social science is challenging but heartening. The author does his best to explain concepts in learning science without getting too far into the philosophical weeds. The book is willing to take the time to investigate newer constructs like "grit" without portraying those concepts as anything beyond a construct. (Though I may be giving the book too much credit.) It takes the time to explicate the limitations of these constructs and explore criticisms without limiting those criticisms to a personal narrative, something many pop science books tend to do. However, It doesn't do this with discussions of IQ and the Flynn effect. It leaves out most bog-standard criticisms of IQ—that it privileges western concepts, that the Ravens test privileges visual modalities, people who live in houses, &c—and treats IQ as a thing that exists in the world. This tendency towards objectivism continues in more insidious ways.

Sadly, the book descends into viewing all its psychology from the lens of economics. Here is where the line between self help book and pop science book starts to fade and in many places gets crossed, sometimes without saying so. The book presents a compelling argument for cultivating a diversity of experiences and domains of study, but does so by explicating how those things lead to more social status and more money. It does the thing I hate, that most pop science and self-help books do these days, which is that it confounds success for money or power. Pretty much every appeal to a positive value finds that value as being a part of a promotion at your job, increasing your attractiveness, getting a new job, increasing influence (always generally or through these other named factors), or ranking higher in some ordinal quantification of some domain. The book almost never gestures towards the values of making a world that is more just, that seeks to lower inequity and suffering, to treat people as ends themselves, or to understand and empathize with people who are different from you or the social norms of their society. It operationalizes value through patent counts, prizes, income, employee/direct report quantity, and fame.

I would recommend this book to pretty much anyone, as it is an antidote to the impetus towards hyper-specialization and the feeling of being behind in your education, profession, or area of interest. It __will__ make you feel better about the diversity of your experiences and your nontraditional background. But keep in mind the way it talks about and uses values, and the way it tries to situate this sense of diversity.
  jtth | Aug 17, 2021 |
The perfect book for anyone who has ever been annoyed that they didn't spend enough time doing just one thing. A delightful rebuttal to the "10,000 hours" theory of mastery, well supported by all lots of research and case studies. ( )
  JohnNienart | Jul 11, 2021 |
For the first few chapters, it seemed like this book was shaping up to be one of those "everybody does X, but Y is better" non-fiction narratives. Don't get me wrong, I love this type of hook. It's anti-conventional wisdom and occasionally the counter-proponents are right. But then David Epstein's Range did a deep dive and convincingly made the case for a broad spectrum of education and experience.

It's almost like specialization was a self-reinforcing problem we should have all seen coming. At the outset it makes sense. Be an expert at something. But then it became extraordinarily difficult to remain an education generalist and still expect a well-paying career. The specialists then naturally and inadvertently siloed themselves and the potential for the problem grew from there. It's difficult to say what will happen long term, but if the expertise of the specialists grows less reliable than the generalists (or possibly even AI), then we could see another cultural work shift.

Time will tell but I believe Range offers a fair warning of what's to come. ( )
  Daniel.Estes | May 17, 2021 |
I'll start by quoting this from the book:

"Knowledge is a double-edged sword. It allows you to do some things, but it also makes you blind to other things that you could do."

The book's premise is about developing a range of skills than going deep into a few of them. It shows how specialization hinders our growth, though the author admits that specialists are very much required.

Concepts like grit, 10000 hours and deliberate practice are challenged and the advice given is to try a plethora of things early on. It was nice reading about how T- and I-people differ in their contributions to the world.

Personally, I've been benefitted by reading a variety of subjects and hence gaining breadth. But then, being in a technology field, I need to go deep in my field as well. ( )
  nmarun | Feb 7, 2021 |
Exceptional topic, it brings forth the idea that over specialization is over rated and mental meandering is an great tool for the current world.

Great book for late starters or people concerned that they haven't "got it figured" yet. ( )
  marcialcambronero | Feb 5, 2021 |
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David Epsteinautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Damron, WillNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Garruzzo, CassandraDissenyadorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Young, CourtneyEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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And he refused to specialize in anything, preferring to keep an eye on the overall estate rather than any of its parts. . . . And Nikolay’s management produced the most brilliant results.

—Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

No tool is omnicompetent. There is no such thing as a master-key that will unlock all doors.

—Arnold Toynbee, A Study of History
Dedicatòria
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For Elizabeth,

this one and any other one
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Let's start with a couple of stories from the world of sports. (Introduction)
One year and four days after World War II in Europe ended in unconditional surrender, Laszlo Polgar was born in a small town in Hungary—the seed of a new family. (Chapter 1)
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"David Epstein manages to make me thoroughly enjoy the experience of being told that everything I thought about something was wrong. I loved Range." Malcolm Gladwell, bestselling author of Outliers.Range is the ground-breaking and exhilarating New York Times bestselling exploration into how to be successful in the 21st Century, from David Epstein the acclaimed author of The Sports Gene.What if everything you have been taught about how to succeed in life was wrong? From the '10,000 hours rule' to the power of Tiger parenting, we have been taught that success in any field requires early specialization and many hours of deliberate practice. And, worse, that if you dabble or delay, you'll never catch up with those who got a head start. This is completely wrong.In this landmark book, David Epstein shows that the way to excel is by sampling widely, gaining a breadth of experiences, taking detours, experimenting relentlessly, juggling many interests - in other words, by developing range.Studying the world's most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors, and scientists Epstein discovered that in most fields - especially those that are complex and unpredictable - generalists, not specialists, are primed to excel. They are also more creative, more agile, and able to make connections their more specialized peers can't see. Range proves that by spreading your knowledge across multiple domains is the key to success rather than deepening their knowledge in a single area. Provocative, rigorous, and engrossing, Range explains how to maintain the benefits of breadth, diverse experience and interdisciplinary thinking in a world that increasingly demands, hyper-specialization.PRAISE FOR RANGE"I want to give Range to any kid who is being forced to take violin lessons-but really wants to learn the drums; to any programmer who secretly dreams of becoming a psychologist; to everyone who wants humans to thrive in an age of robots. Range is full of surprises and hope, a 21st century survival guide." Amanda Ripley, author of The Smartest Kids in the World. "An assiduously researched and accessible argument for being a jack of all trades." O Magazine, Best Nonfiction Books Coming in 2019 "Brilliant, timely, and utterly impossible to put down. If you care about improving skill, innovation, and performance, you need to read this book." Daniel Coyle, author of The Culture Code and The Talent Code "A fresh, brisk look at creativity, learning, and the meaning of achievement." Kirkus Reviews "It's a joy to spend hours in the company of a writer as gifted as David Epstein. And the joy is all the greater when that writer shares so much crucial and revelatory information about performance, success, and education." Susan Cain, author of Quiet

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