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The ghost stories of Edith Wharton de Edith…
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The ghost stories of Edith Wharton (1973 original; edició 1975)

de Edith Wharton

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7562121,833 (3.8)78
In these powerful and elegant tales, Edith Wharton evokes moods of disquiet and darkness within her own era. In icy new England a fearsome double foreshadows the fate of a rich young man; a married farmer is bewitched by a dead girl; a ghostly bell saves a woman's reputation. Brittany conjures ancient cruelties, Dorset witnesses a retrospective haunting and a New York club cushions an elderly aesthete as he tells of the ghastly eyes haunting his nights.… (més)
Membre:metrolapin
Títol:The ghost stories of Edith Wharton
Autors:Edith Wharton
Informació:London : Constable, 1975.
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca, Per llegir
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Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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The Ghost Stories of Edith Wharton de Edith Wharton (1973)

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    The Ghosts of Kerfol de Deborah Noyes (legxleg)
    legxleg: The Ghosts of Kerfol is based upon one of Edith Wharton's classic ghost stories, Kerfol.
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Es mostren 1-5 de 21 (següent | mostra-les totes)
If you like the quiet ghost stories of Henry James but could do without the run-on sentences that you have to scan three times before they become comprehensible, this collection is exactly what you're looking for. Edith Wharton was a writer of great depth and subtlety, but because she strove for clarity, she's also readable. Here you'll find masterpieces of atmosphere ("All Souls'") and of characterization ("The Triumph of Night"), as well as the occasional novelty ("Kerfol"); if you're anything like me, you'll gladly read each of them multiple times. My personal favorites are "Afterward" (generally considered Wharton's best ghost story) and "Pomegranate Seed." Laszlo Kubinyi's illustrations are eerily beautiful accompaniments to the tales.

Frankly, I've never understood why people are surprised that Wharton wrote ghost stories. Many authors of the first rank (Ivan Turgenev, D.H. Lawrence, F. Scott Fitzgerald) have engaged in at least a passing flirtation with the macabre, and for some--like James and Wharton--it was an abiding interest. The perception of ghost and horror stories as illegitimate or disreputable originated with small-minded literary critics, and can now be dispensed with. ( )
  Jonathan_M | Dec 25, 2020 |
Wharton's stories feature fairly well-mannered ghosts, realistic in their inscrutability but not exactly scary. Many stories started promisingly but didn't quite deliver. I most liked "Kerfol", "The Looking Glass", and "All Souls'". ( )
  ImperfectCJ | Oct 20, 2020 |
Well, some of the stories deserved 4 stars to be honest, but a couple of them deserved two. The trouble with a book of short stories is you can never do them all justice with one rating.

Eleven tales in this volume by Edith Wharton, author of Ethan Frome...who all the while I was reading this I was confusing with Willa Cather. Don't ask me why, I know the difference. But, I even went so far as to tell my husband "It's ghost stories written by the author of My Antonia!" Uh, no, it's not. All at once it dawned on me one day. No one told me, I didn't see a Cather book to spur me. I have no idea. Probably loosing my mind. My Gran swore it would happen one day and it'd serve me right for making her lose hers.

The first was rubbish, abrupt ending and nothing resolved. Just when it started to get good it hit a brick wall that was "The End". The second was clever, but not scary. The third was quite good and did make a little chill go up your spine, though a bit rambley to start out with. The fourth and fifth were hardly noteworthy and the sixth was a DIRTY TRICK! I'd have gone back and slapped the snot out of that lady! Seven was uninteresting to me, but eight was quite good, nice and creepy. Nine pissed me off to be honest. I was really into the story, but there is one little (uh, HUGE) thing left unresolved that I'm not happy to just live with or speculate about! If you want to kill someone off, author, fine...if you want to keep them alive, fine. But, to end a tale without me knowing is just mean. (I was into this one up until the last word, however.) Ten was just Blah, but eleven was really good, high with the creepy factor and probably my favorite of them all.

Wharton has some really amazing prose that jumped out at me at times, like:

"But they had - how shall I say? - a physical effect that was the equivalent of a bad smell: their look left a smear like a snail's."

"His stupidity was a natural grace - it was as beautiful, really, as his eyelashes."

"At first I used to wonder what had put into that radiant head the detestable delusion that it held a brain."

"There were even moments of weariness when, like the victim of some poison which leaves the brain clear, but holds the body motionless, she saw herself domesticated with the Horror, accepting it's perpetual presence as one of the fixed conditions of life."

Yes, all things considered I enjoyed the read. ( )
  Amelia1989 | Jun 11, 2019 |
A bit uneven, for sure, but there are some excellently creepy stories in here, particularly in the second half of the book. Among those I liked best: "Kerfol," "Mr. Jones," "Pomegranate Seed," and "Miss Mary Pask." ( )
1 vota JBD1 | Mar 30, 2019 |
I'm not a short story fan, nor am I a horror/ghost story fan. However, I can recommend this book. Because--it's Edith Wharton. While there were a few stories I was puzzled by, or that didn't pull me in, or that were duds, in most of the stories Wharton's prose shone, the characters were well-developed, and the plots were varied and original. My favorites were: "The Dutchess at Prayer" in which an evil husband isolates his wife at an Italian country estate and, knowingly or unknowingly, seals her lover into a tomb; "A Bottle of Perrier," which is set in the middle eastern desert castle built by a medieval crusader, where the water tastes and smells terrible; and "Kesfol" where the ghosts of murdered dogs appear once a year on a Brittany estate.

3 1/2 stars ( )
  arubabookwoman | Feb 5, 2019 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 21 (següent | mostra-les totes)
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"Do you believe in ghosts?" is the pointless question often addressed by those who are incapable of feeling ghostly influences to - I will not say the ghost-seer, always a rare bird, but - the ghost-feeler, the person sensible of invisible currents of being in certain places and at certain hours. (Introduction)
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In these powerful and elegant tales, Edith Wharton evokes moods of disquiet and darkness within her own era. In icy new England a fearsome double foreshadows the fate of a rich young man; a married farmer is bewitched by a dead girl; a ghostly bell saves a woman's reputation. Brittany conjures ancient cruelties, Dorset witnesses a retrospective haunting and a New York club cushions an elderly aesthete as he tells of the ghastly eyes haunting his nights.

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