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Phat Acceptance (2007)

de Jess Mowry

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412,900,704 (5)No n'hi ha cap
Fourteen-year-old Brandon Williams has movie star good looks, a generous allowance, a nice house in Santa Cruz, but he's not happy. When he makes an unexpected decision to attend public school, he experiences prejudice for the first time. Among his new friends are the fat kids and Brandon sees first-hand how much American society condones hatred for these kids and how the constant pressure to be movie-star thin makes normal kids suffer and healthy kids sick.… (més)
Afegit fa poc perJess.Mowry, rowfy, JessMowry
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Even those of us in our early teens are old enough to remember when there were basically four kind of kids if you wanted to describe how much they weighed. There were skinny kids, average kids, chubby kids, and fat kids. Sometimes there were REALLY fat kids, way fat kids, or hella fat kids, but nobody called them "obese," except doctors. If a kid called a kid "obese" most other kids would have called him weird or something. If somebody was being mean, they might call a fat kid "fatty, lardo, blubber tub," or something like that. But usually if a kid was cool and you liked him you didn't think about how much he weighed, or even really notice. But now every kid who weighs about 10 pounds more than anybody thinks they should is "obese." Like Jess Mowry says in his book, Phat Acceptance, "obese" has become the latest hate-speak. It's a word now used by closet-haters who used to be too scared to say the N-word about black people, or dis other people who were gay, brown, Asian or Jewish. Even worse is that this society says it's okay to dis anybody who weighs more than people think he or she should, especially kids. The idea seems to be that if fat kids don't like being dissed and hated-on then they should lose weight. So it is totally acceptable to hurt anybody's feelings if you think they weigh more than they should. Everybody has become an expert on heatlh and how much kids should weigh.

Here is a quote from the book:
"Formerly loving, caring parents had turned into anti-obesity priests beating their bibles of fat-hating rites. They made every meal a torment of guilt, and every snack a deadly sin. They set weight limits and lectured on health -- parroting TV, of course. They punished with doctors, diets or camps, and apologized to their neighbors and friends for the "fat little slob" their kid had become."

Another quote:
"Nobody wants to defend these kids. They gave up their rights by getting fat. No one cares if they're teased or bullied. Or even beaten up."
"Yeah," agreed Brandon. Like, 'your kids are fat, and if you loved them you'd make them lose weight.' So, if they're fat you don't love them. And if they don't like being teased, bullied, beat up and hated, then they should get skinny. Like, we've finally found some people to hate and nobody cares if we do. ...Like, open season on fat kids and nobody needs a hunting permit. Or has to prove they're qualified. Just get a gun and start shooting."

There is a multi-billion-dollar "heath" and diet industry that gets more obese every year buy selling diet and health plans and pills, most of which don't work. Most of the pills and "weight loss formulas" don't have to be tested to see if they are even safe, yet people who you would think were fairly smart put them in their mouths.

Another quote:
"...Every year," the teacher droned, "There are 300,000 deaths in America because of obesity. Furthermore..."
Travis raised his hand. Mr, Mortimer looked surprised. "...Yes?"
"Those statistics were never objectively proven," said Travis. "The original study never mentioned other health-risks fat people might have, like drinkin', smokin', an' drug use. Including diet drugs. Especially all those sold on TV that never have to be tested so nobody knows what's in `em. That study also never mentioned excessive dieting, yo-yo dieting, an' diet itself as contributing factors to health risks. Also not gettin' exercise. Or depression or stress... like from gettin' dissed all the time or havin' to listen to lectures like yours. None of those things were stuided, an' their effects on average size people were never compared to fat ones."
Mr. Mortimer blinked like a deer caught in headlights. Then he cleared his throat. "These are facts in your Science book," he said in an almost astonished voice, as if Travis had spit on a Bible."

These are some of the things that are talked about in this book. But this is not a book about whether it is bad to be fat or good to be skinny. Jess Mowry leaves that up to the so-called "experts." Instead, Phat Acceptance is a story about friendship that crosses all lines of race, color and size. It's a story about accepting other people for who they are, not what they look like. The main character is Brandon Williams. Brandon is an average size (or maybe a bit chubby) boy of 14. He has blond hair and blue eyes. Some people might say he is a rich kid because he lives in a million-dollar house by the ocean in Santa Cruz, California. Brandon has everything that most teens in America either have, want, or think they are entitled to. His room is stuffed with all of the newest and coolest gear, and there is even a maid to do his laundry. Brandon has gone to a private school from kindergarten to 8th grade. He is smart, but he has also had problems with dope and has basically wasted a year of his life staying high. One of Brandon's lifetime friends, Troy Durrant, mostly abandoned him during this year, and the only friend who stayed true was Tommy Turner, two years younger than Brandon and fat, who lives next door. Against his parent's wishes, Brandon decides to go to a public high school. Since nobody knows him there, and nobody knows if he is cool or not, he hooks up with the kind of kids who are usually outcasts in high school, and many of them are fat. There is Travis White who just moved down from Oakland. Travis is the school's fattest kid at over 500 pounds. He is also one of the few black kids in that school. There is Bosco Donatello, a word-class surfer dude who is very chubby. There is Danny Little-Wing, a Native-American dude who is the second fattest kid at school, and also Carlos a Latino gang kid. Brandon's other new friends include Zach, a pot-bellied gainer whose girlfriend feeds him, and Rex Watson, the school's smallest kid who skipped a grade. None of the fat kids call themselves "obese" except a dude named Jason Bray who hates being fat and is always talking about losing weight but who never does.
Most of the story takes place between the start of school in September and Halloween at the end of October. In these two months, Brandon not only learns all about being a fat kid in this society, including the world of gainers, feeders, admirers and encouragers, but he also learns about his multi-racial friends. This is not just a story about fat kids. There is surfing, skating and various adventures. We also learn how easily our minds are controlled by TV, movies, and the so-called news to make us hate anybody we are told to hate and never ask why. We are also conditioned to buy and consume from the minute we watch our first TV show. The big question is not whether it's always unhealthy to be chubby or fat, instead it is how far do we let ourselves be brainwashed into thinking that everybody has to be the same size and look like a Hollywood star? And if they don't, should me make them?
Adolph Hitler said, "A German boy should be lean and mean." The health-nazis today are saying the same thing. ( )
  rowfy | Aug 13, 2007 |
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For all the phat kids
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Maybe he wasn't the world's fattest kid, but he was definitely the fattest that Brandon had seen!
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Mr. Jakarta smiled once more. "So far we have heard four excellent stories. We have been taught to listen to clowns. We have also been taught to torment people simply because of their size or weight. And, as Mr. Donatello has said, we are taught to always buy what we want, and consume more things than we actually need."
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No n'hi ha cap

Fourteen-year-old Brandon Williams has movie star good looks, a generous allowance, a nice house in Santa Cruz, but he's not happy. When he makes an unexpected decision to attend public school, he experiences prejudice for the first time. Among his new friends are the fat kids and Brandon sees first-hand how much American society condones hatred for these kids and how the constant pressure to be movie-star thin makes normal kids suffer and healthy kids sick.

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Jess Mowry és un autor/a de LibraryThing, un autor/a que afegeix la seva biblioteca personal a LibraryThing.

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