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de Euripides

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In their translation of Euripides' Iphigeneia at Aulis, noted American poet W.S. Merwin and eminent classicist George E. Dimock offer a compelling look at the devastating consequence of "man's inhumanity to man." A stern critique of Greek culture, Iphigeneia at Aulis condemns the Trojan War,depicting the ugly and awesome power of political ambition. Agamemnon's sacrifice of his daughter Iphigeneia to facilitate the Greek Armies advance on Troy is marvelously conveyed by Merwin, as he impressively recreates the broad array of moral and emotional tones with which Euripides has investedone of the most moving plays in the history of drama. With its insightful introduction by Dimock, notes on the text, and a glossary of mythical and geographical terms, this edition of Iphigeneia at Aulis is indispensable to an understanding of Euripides' tragic vision.… (més)
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I really enjoyed reading this play, but the version I saw in London was kind of terrible.
  aratiel | Sep 5, 2018 |
Near the end of Iphigenia at Aulis, Iphigenia has offered herself as a sacrificial victim:
"I have decided that I must die. And I shall die gloriously."(p 58) At this point the Chorus echoes her praises, but one wonders at the events that have led to this point and the event that will come to follow this moment as the ending turns the drama on its head.

The story told in this drama by Euripides is one that Athenians knew well. It was told by Aeschylus in his drama Agamemnon, the first play in the trilogy known as The Oresteia. Thus it would have had a tremendous impact on this audience and that impact has continued to this day. In Aeschylus's play the Chorus, made up of the old men of Argos, enters and tells the story of how the Trojan Prince Paris stole Helen, the wife of the Greek king Menelaus, leading to ten years of war between Greece and Troy. Then the Chorus recalls how Clytemnestra's husband Agamemnon (Menelaus' brother) sacrificed their daughter Iphigenia at Aulis to the god Artemis to obtain a favorable wind for the Greek fleet.

The play raises serious questions about the value of an individual life, and under what circumstances that life can be taken. Is the play's central event, the sacrifice of Iphigenia, a pointless waste, or a tragic necessity? Do the players, her father Agamemnon, Achilles, and Iphigenia herself, have a choice or is their fate determined by the gods (Artemis in particular)? Is the war that will be fought as a result of her sacrifice a just cause, or a petty quarrel over individuals and the fate of the beautiful Helen? Is her decision to offer herself an act of heroic patriotism? Acceptance of the inevitable or possibly a sign of madness? These questions and more linger in one's mind during and after reading this powerful drama.

In Euripides play Iphigenia invokes values important to the Greeks (p 58-9); including obedience to the gods, "Artemis has determined to take this my body--can I, a mere mortal, thwart a goddess's will?"; that the community is more important than the individual, the Greeks must prevail over the barbarians, that men are more valuable than women, and that death in defense of these values is glorious and brings everlasting fame, "Sacrifice me and destroy Troy. That will be my epitaph for eternity. That will be my glory,". That the glory that she seeks is one determined by men is an open question. The play also raises questions about the importance of the family as her mother, Clytemnestra and supposed suitor, Achilles, take on important roles.

The translation of this play by Nicholas Rudall is both lucid and poetic in an attempt to capture some of the music that Euripides was famous for. His tragic irony shines through the dialogue. The questions raised in this play are universal in the sense that we still are concerned over the nature of heroism and fidelity to one's community. Euripides won a prize for this drama even though he was no longer present in Athens and had died the previous year. I would recommend this to all who are interested in these questions and their presentation in one of the singular dramas of the Western tradition.n. ( )
  jwhenderson | Oct 26, 2015 |
Iphigenia em Áulis é incrivelmente triste. Agamemnon pretende sacrificar a filha pelo orgulho de seu exército, Aquiles quer salvá-la apenas porque seu nome foi utilizado, e ela mesa decide se entregar ao sacrifício para morrer com dignidade, ao invés de ser arrastada para o altar.
Os eventos desse livro prenunciam toda a Orestéia, e atingem uma força poética qe só pode ser descrita como pungente. ( )
  JuliaBoechat | Mar 30, 2013 |
Saw this at an incredibly small and intimate venue in Chicago and was blown away. The play was essentially 85 mins of pure pathos and somehow never grew tiresome or overwrought. I (and my girlfriend) got teary-eyed on a few occasions when [Spoiler Alert!!] Agamemnon had to tell his daughter he was going to kill her and when she had resolved to die with honor and actually rejoiced in the decision.

The music was provided by a lone drum and violin that added to the intimacy and provided a really evocative ambiance. ( )
  rores28 | Jun 6, 2011 |
This is the most cynical of the Greek plays I've encountered so far. Agamemnon must choose between sacrificing his daughter, Iphigenia, to ensure fare winds for the fleet or face the wrath of his men who place martial honor far above familial affection. The story casts an unflattering light on the supposed heroes of the Trojan War; only Achilles comes through with any modicum of grace. The reader's only satisfaction is in knowing the fate awaiting Agamemnon some years hence, and wishing it could be visited on a few others. Killing a daughter for a war whose sole basis is satisfying outraged male pride would seem so foreign to modern sensibilities, but we only have to look at honor killings to see that those sensibilities can be wrong.

This is a prose translation by the director of The Court Theater using modern, colloquial English. I found it completely readable. However, I also tried a more traditional version I found online at The Internet Classics Archive and preferred it. ( )
  TadAD | Apr 25, 2010 |
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Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Euripidesautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Koolschijn, GerardTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Lumley, Jane LumleyTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

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In their translation of Euripides' Iphigeneia at Aulis, noted American poet W.S. Merwin and eminent classicist George E. Dimock offer a compelling look at the devastating consequence of "man's inhumanity to man." A stern critique of Greek culture, Iphigeneia at Aulis condemns the Trojan War,depicting the ugly and awesome power of political ambition. Agamemnon's sacrifice of his daughter Iphigeneia to facilitate the Greek Armies advance on Troy is marvelously conveyed by Merwin, as he impressively recreates the broad array of moral and emotional tones with which Euripides has investedone of the most moving plays in the history of drama. With its insightful introduction by Dimock, notes on the text, and a glossary of mythical and geographical terms, this edition of Iphigeneia at Aulis is indispensable to an understanding of Euripides' tragic vision.

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