IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

London: A Social History (1994)

de Roy Porter

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
399648,181 (3.71)6
This dazzling and yet intimate book is the first modern one-volume history of London from Roman times to the present. An extraordinary city, London grew from a backwater in the Classical age into an important medieval city, a significant Renaissance urban center, and a modern colossus. Roy Porter paints a detailed landscape--from the grid streets and fortresses of Julius Caesar and William the Conqueror to the medieval, walled "most noble city" of churches, friars, and crown and town relationships. Within the crenelated battlements, manufactures and markets developed and street-life buzzed. London's profile in 1500 was much as it was at the peak of Roman power. The city owed its courtly splendor and national pride of the Tudor Age to the phenomenal expansion of its capital. It was the envy of foreigners, the spur of civic patriotism, and a hub of culture, architecture, great literature, and new religion. From the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries, London experienced a cruel civil war, raging fires, enlightenment in thought, government, and living, and the struggle and benefits of empire. From the lament that "London was but is no more" to "you, who are to stand a wonder to all Years and ages...a phoenix," London became an elegant, eye-catching, metropolitan hub. It was a mosaic, Porter shows, that represented the shared values of a people--both high and low born--at work and play. London was and is a wonder city, a marvel. Not since ancient times has there been such a city--not eternal, but vibrant, living, full of a free people ever evolving. In this transcendent book, Roy Porter touches the pulse of his hometown and makes it our own, capturing London's fortunes, people, and imperial glory with brio and wit.… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 6 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 6 (següent | mostra-les totes)
I think I first heard of this book way back when I was at university in Finland and did a British and Irish studies module about London in literature—it has therefore spent over fifteen years on my TBR list. But better late than never: when I came across it in a charity shop six weeks ago I rushed to buy it and didn't waste much time picking it up to read (unlike some other books on my shelves). And although the book doesn't reach the present—it comes to a somewhat pessimistic outlook for London coming out of the Thatcher era—some of its final thoughts about the tourist London, the rich foreign houseowner's London still seem relevant, even if investment in transport has evidently increased and the mayor brought a new element in the question of who governs London. ( )
  mari_reads | Feb 16, 2019 |
Although this history starts at the beginning of London, it reaches the Reformation by page 45 (of over 400 pages) so it i primarily about early modern and modern London ( )
1 vota antiquary | Jun 12, 2017 |
'London was always a muddle that worked. Will it remain that way?' is Roy Porter's closing question in this extensive, but engrossing, work. I chose his final remark to start this review because it encapsulates his view that London is "not the eternal city" and, he argues, may well now be at its end as a livable metropolis. Pessimistically he argues that it was at its greatest " ... between the two Elizabeths, between 1570 and 1986 to be more precise..." and he seems to sincerely fret that, once again, as in Roman times, London might be abandoned and "left to the dogs".

Certainly he presents the evidence that London grew too fast and too big "like a fungus" and he details the social and human dimension of that massive growth - unstructured, uncontrolled and ungoverned. From the mobs, the riots the plagues and the Great Fire came an unruly tradition that was translated into a totally unplanned sprawl as the people moved up, and away, from the collapsing city's origins.

Given the published date it is appropriate that he concentrates on the hardness of the Margaret Thatcher policy years and the dreadful impact that such laissez faire, "market forces" led attitudes to the city's growingly desperate needs for public housing, transport and infrastructure. The industries that provided the employment - that provided the taxes and disposable income for the city's fitness and survival - fled to the provinces (or over-seas). The redevelopment, Porter explains, did nothing to resolve these problems as the jobs that were created were filled by transfer, the housing that was built was so `upscale' that the indigenous could not afford to live in it and the `gentrification' of the East End and London Docks only provided for the Thatcherites of the "greed is good" generation. Tourism is now how London survives as even its traditional money-based `service industries' evacuate the remaining centers, to internet-commute, diversify, down-size or are sold off to foreign interests.

Porter's pessimism then is perhaps justified? We must hope not ... as Dr. Johnson once remarked; London is life and its crumbling and dissolution would be our collective loss.
2 vota John_Vaughan | Feb 2, 2012 |
History of London
  richardhobbs | Dec 5, 2010 |
Porter gives a good overview of London's rise as a great city, then a detailed view of its society (poor, rich, and in-between) during the long 19th century, covering the rise of capitalism and the Victorian era. If you are interested in the English classics (Defoe, Dickens, Doyle, etc.), this is a great companion book. It can help you to understand the many sides of a city that grew too fast at the beginning of the industrial revolution. It paints a fine picture of the glories and the filth and shame of London. ( )
2 vota OneMorePage | Apr 25, 2010 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 6 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
When I grow rich
Say the bells of Shoreditch
Children's son, Oranges and Lemons
From the bones of extinct monsters and the coins of Roman emperors in the cellars to the name of the shopman over the door, the whole story is fascinating and the material endless. Perhaps Cockneys are a prejudiced race, but certainly this inexhaustible richness seems to belong to London more than to any other great city. Virginia Woolf (1916)
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
To my parents
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
London is not the eternal city; it had its hour upon the stage.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
This dazzling and yet intimate book is the first modern one-volume history of London from Roman times to the present. An extraordinary city, London grew from a backwater in the Classical age into an important medieval city, a significant Renaissance urban center, and a modern colossus. Roy Porter paints a detailed landscape--from the grid streets and fortresses of Julius Caesar and William the Conqueror to the medieval, walled "most noble city" of churches, friars, and crown and town relationships. Within the crenelated battlements, manufactures and markets developed and street-life buzzed. London's profile in 1500 was much as it was at the peak of Roman power. The city owed its courtly splendor and national pride of the Tudor Age to the phenomenal expansion of its capital. It was the envy of foreigners, the spur of civic patriotism, and a hub of culture, architecture, great literature, and new religion. From the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries, London experienced a cruel civil war, raging fires, enlightenment in thought, government, and living, and the struggle and benefits of empire. From the lament that "London was but is no more" to "you, who are to stand a wonder to all Years and ages...a phoenix," London became an elegant, eye-catching, metropolitan hub. It was a mosaic, Porter shows, that represented the shared values of a people--both high and low born--at work and play. London was and is a wonder city, a marvel. Not since ancient times has there been such a city--not eternal, but vibrant, living, full of a free people ever evolving. In this transcendent book, Roy Porter touches the pulse of his hometown and makes it our own, capturing London's fortunes, people, and imperial glory with brio and wit.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.71)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 11
3.5 2
4 12
4.5 1
5 3

Penguin Australia

Una edició d'aquest llibre ha estat publicada per Penguin Australia.

» Pàgina d'informació de l'editor

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 159,237,098 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible