IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Children of the Land: A Memoir de Marcelo…
S'està carregant…

Children of the Land: A Memoir (edició 2020)

de Marcelo Hernandez Castillo (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1224194,071 (3.46)5
An NPR Best Book of the Year A 2020 International Latino Book Award Finalist An Entertainment Weekly, The Millions, and LitHub Most Anticipated Book of the Year  This unforgettable memoir from a prize-winning poet about growing up undocumented in the United States recounts the sorrows and joys of a family torn apart by draconian policies and chronicles one young man's attempt to build a future in a nation that denies his existence. "You were not a ghost even though an entire country was scared of you. No one in this story was a ghost. This was not a story." When Marcelo Hernandez Castillo was five years old and his family was preparing to cross the border between Mexico and the United States, he suffered temporary, stress-induced blindness. Castillo regained his vision, but quickly understood that he had to move into a threshold of invisibility before settling in California with his parents and siblings. Thus began a new life of hiding in plain sight and of paying extraordinarily careful attention at all times for fear of being truly seen. Before Castillo was one of the most celebrated poets of a generation, he was a boy who perfected his English in the hopes that he might never seem extraordinary. With beauty, grace, and honesty, Castillo recounts his and his family's encounters with a system that treats them as criminals for seeking safe, ordinary lives. He writes of the Sunday afternoon when he opened the door to an ICE officer who had one hand on his holster, of the hours he spent making a fake social security card so that he could work to support his family, of his father's deportation and the decade that he spent waiting to return to his wife and children only to be denied reentry, and of his mother's heartbreaking decision to leave her children and grandchildren so that she could be reunited with her estranged husband and retire from a life of hard labor. Children of the Land distills the trauma of displacement, illuminates the human lives behind the headlines and serves as a stunning meditation on what it means to be a man and a citizen.… (més)
Membre:emswedberg
Títol:Children of the Land: A Memoir
Autors:Marcelo Hernandez Castillo (Autor)
Informació:Harper (2020), 389 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

Children of the Land de Marcelo Hernandez Castillo

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 5 mencions

Es mostren totes 4
I found this book in an article titled something like, "Books to Read Other Than 'American Dirt'" and I'm so glad my neighbor had a copy I could borrow. The memoir read like song lyrics at some points, painting this painful music in my heart. He writes in a way that dug deep into my soul. I finished this book and wondered if I should have been allowed to read it, it was so very deeply personal. I highly recommend it. ( )
  KimZoot | Jan 2, 2022 |
“When I came undocumented to the U.S., I crossed into a threshold of invisibility. Every act of living became an act of trying to remain visible. I was negotiating a simultaneous absence and presence that was begun by the act of my displacement: I am trying to dissect the moment of my erasure. “

This is a solid memoir about the immigrant experience. Castillo was five years old, when he crossed the border with his family. For the next 2 decades, it becomes a story of survival. Tales of deportation and displacement, a family, struggling to find footing in America, against draconian policies. The writing is good but could have used a little editing. Castillo is also a poet, so I would like to sample some of his poetry. ( )
  msf59 | May 28, 2021 |
loved everything about it- especially the way it is written. very beautiful, sad, and real. ( )
  gkraus | May 18, 2021 |
This memoir is about Hernandez Castillo's life--and those of his parents--as an undocumented immigrant. Brought to the US at age 5, he grew up largely north of Sacramento. He well knew the drill--be invisible, do not talk or argue, do not draw any attention. He went to the University of Michigan as an undocumented student.

He does an excellent job of explaining the anxiety, stress, and fear he was raised with. He saw his father deported. Even after he gets a green card after marriage, the anxiety is still there. The fear of border patrol, of showing his documents--it's always there.
———
My only disagreement is that on page 117 he writes "I took for granted how much growing up in California quietly consoled me just by being in the presence of people like me. But in the frigid Michigan snow, in its humid summers, in small corn-fed towns that I'm sure meant well when their people asked me 'So what are you?' I had to recalibrate who I was to those around me." He then goes on to explain they had to hide the identities of their culture, and how after two years it was exhausting. I understand why he assumed this was because he (and his wife) are Latinx. But it happens to lots and lots of people, including those who in California are largely considered boring white people--Midwesterners (especially small town Midwetserners) question anyone who does not have an English/German/ Scandinavian surname, and who has dark hair and even pale olive skin. It happened to me many times in 4 years in Wisconsin. It very much IS exhausting and it DOES make you feel very unwelcome and excluded. ( )
  Dreesie | Aug 23, 2020 |
Es mostren totes 4
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en rus. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

Cap

An NPR Best Book of the Year A 2020 International Latino Book Award Finalist An Entertainment Weekly, The Millions, and LitHub Most Anticipated Book of the Year  This unforgettable memoir from a prize-winning poet about growing up undocumented in the United States recounts the sorrows and joys of a family torn apart by draconian policies and chronicles one young man's attempt to build a future in a nation that denies his existence. "You were not a ghost even though an entire country was scared of you. No one in this story was a ghost. This was not a story." When Marcelo Hernandez Castillo was five years old and his family was preparing to cross the border between Mexico and the United States, he suffered temporary, stress-induced blindness. Castillo regained his vision, but quickly understood that he had to move into a threshold of invisibility before settling in California with his parents and siblings. Thus began a new life of hiding in plain sight and of paying extraordinarily careful attention at all times for fear of being truly seen. Before Castillo was one of the most celebrated poets of a generation, he was a boy who perfected his English in the hopes that he might never seem extraordinary. With beauty, grace, and honesty, Castillo recounts his and his family's encounters with a system that treats them as criminals for seeking safe, ordinary lives. He writes of the Sunday afternoon when he opened the door to an ICE officer who had one hand on his holster, of the hours he spent making a fake social security card so that he could work to support his family, of his father's deportation and the decade that he spent waiting to return to his wife and children only to be denied reentry, and of his mother's heartbreaking decision to leave her children and grandchildren so that she could be reunited with her estranged husband and retire from a life of hard labor. Children of the Land distills the trauma of displacement, illuminates the human lives behind the headlines and serves as a stunning meditation on what it means to be a man and a citizen.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.46)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 5
3.5
4 5
4.5
5 2

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 177,122,633 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible