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Piranesi de Susanna Clarke
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Piranesi (edició 2020)

de Susanna Clarke (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,9791116,324 (4.23)137
Piranesi lives in the House. Perhaps he always has. In his notebooks, day after day, he makes a clear and careful record of its wonders: the labyrinth of halls, the thousands upon thousands of statues, the tides that thunder up staircases, the clouds that move in slow procession through the upper halls. On Tuesdays and Fridays Piranesi sees his friend, the Other. At other times he brings tributes of food and waterlilies to the Dead. But mostly, he is alone. Messages begin to appear, scratched out in chalk on the pavements. There is someone new in the House. But who are they and what do they want? Are they a friend or do they bring destruction and madness as the Other claims? Lost texts must be found; secrets must be uncovered. The world that Piranesi thought he knew is becoming strange and dangerous. The Beauty of the House is immeasurable ; its Kindness infinite.… (més)
Membre:Mary_Overton
Títol:Piranesi
Autors:Susanna Clarke (Autor)
Informació:Bloomsbury Publishing (2020), Edition: 1, 243 pages
Col·leccions:Reference
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Piranesi de Susanna Clarke

  1. 70
    El nebot del mag de C. S. Lewis (Michael.Rimmer)
  2. 50
    Slade House de David Mitchell (CGlanovsky, jonathankws)
  3. 50
    La casa de hojas de Mark Z. Danielewski (hubies)
    hubies: Piranesi is not scary, but in both books there is this mystifying, unpeopled world of impossible (and perhaps infinite) house-like space. Also: cryptic diary entries, unstable mind, short film as a plot device.
  4. 31
    The Secret History de Donna Tartt (sparemethecensor)
  5. 20
    Collected Fictions de Jorge Luis Borges (jakebornheimer)
  6. 10
    The Affirmation de Christopher Priest (tetrachromat)
  7. 10
    The Magician de W. Somerset Maugham (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Aleister Crowley-esque figure
  8. 00
    The Memory Theater: A Novel de Karin Tidbeck (Aquila)
    Aquila: There's a similarlity of background and form in these two books - alternate worlds and amnesia and intellectual cults. And yet they are quite different stories.
  9. 00
    Wittgenstein's Mistress de David Markson (defaults)
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» Mira també 137 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 110 (següent | mostra-les totes)
This is story that evoked emotions in me similar to when I was reading the Deep. But this story didn't made me mad, it did made me sad. So very sad.

It's the kind of story I don't want to give a star rating to because they are in essential meaningless. I did not enjoy reading experience and I think that's why it took so long for me to finish it.

It isn't a story that I would universally recommend. I think everyone would get something wildly different out of it. But the weird thing is... I think it doesn't matter what you get out of it. It's a story about a story.

It hit a spot in me that's still somewhat sore. Maybe it still needs healing. To me the story is about madness and mental illness and how people can live in a world you can never reach. How sometimes they disappear to that world and you can't follow them, you can't make sense if what they are saying even if they try. How sometimes that world is scary to them but it has a order to it. You don't get how it works so you get frustrated, mean and just want it to stop.

Sometimes your loved will come back, suddenly and with love but forever changed.
"Perhaps I should send them a message explaining that Matthew Rose Sorensen now lives inside me, that he is unconscious but perfectly safe, and that I am a strong and resourceful person who will care for him assiduously, exactly as I care for any others of the Dead."
I cried while reading that. Isn't this what we all for for when our loved one is mentally ill? That they are safe?

But to me it is also a story about hope. Because truly:
"The Beauty of the House is immeasurable; its Kindness infinite."
I didn't find the reading experience all that enjoyable because I don't like making myself sad. But I do think I need this book in my life. To re-read it in the future and to see how I changed (or didn't) changed as a person.

If I didn't sort my books by author names this one would be next to the Deep by Rivers Solomon. It's one of those books that says something about you as a person. At least it does for me. And looking at my bookcase I have maybe 8/9 books that would fit in that category. Books that represent a certain period in my life or part of my personality. This would be the next one.

I'm gonna get a hug. ( )
  Jonesy_now | Sep 24, 2021 |
I loved and highly recommend Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell and was so excited to read this. I've been waiting for months for the title to become available through my library and ended up buying the Kindle book when Modern Mrs. Darcy alerted me to the sale.

Unfortunately, though I really wish I could say otherwise, this is not my book. I can't quite put my finger on what exactly didn't work for me. I think it comes down to this: it felt more like an exhibition of technical writing skill than a story filled with heart, warmth, and emotional resonance. There's a line somewhere in the sand between weird/otherworldly/strange and off-putting. For me, this book fell squarely on the side of the latter. I finished it, but I wasn't invested and felt it lacked payoff.

Of course, many others have read and loved it, so Piranesi has found its fans. I'm just not one of them. ( )
  angiestahl | Sep 23, 2021 |
I'd recommend going in blind, without reading any reviews or synopses.

That being said, here's my brief review lol.

The real pleasure of the book is to simply experience the House/the World with Piranesi. Honestly, I would be happy with leaving off the other mysteries beyond. I liked the parts where histories and explanations are revealed, but I loved the Statues, the Corridors, the Floods, the Dead, the Birds, and the way Piranesi understands and explains them. I almost feel the book would have been better if only the reader, and not Piranesi himself, figured out what was actually happening, or if even the reader's understanding was still obscured.

The very very end of the book is perfect though. After reading, I'd recommend going on a walk or bike ride around your neighborhood, just to take a look at the world.

Now, as everyone else is doing, I have to compare the book to Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. Sorry, Ms. Clarke, but when you write one of the greatest fantasy novels of all time the comparisons must happen! Firstly, Piranesi is very different in format, only 250 pages and not a footnote to be seen (though Piranesi's index journal struck me as incredibly Norrell-ian). JS&MN is also very grounded in its Napoleonic time period and Regency style, whereas Piranesi has a much more disconcerting effect of being untethered from any known time or place (at least at first). And while JS&MN makes its mark by tapping into a world so fleshed out and lush with detail that one suspects Susanna Clarke of having lived in and studied it for fifty years, Piranesi's world is that of a single man digesting and explaining his own tiny endless universe. However, while the two projects are obviously very different, I think they're ultimately companions. This is the way I see it: JS&MN is a book with incredible breadth, covering many places and activities in a teeming setting, but always makes sure to hint that every thing you see has its own history and depth that you can often catch glimpses of. Piranesi goes the opposite way, diving deep into one man's interior experiences and perception of the world as he experiences his immediate surroundings and discovers his own past, but hints at a larger more expansive world waiting outside. Piranesi, to me, almost reads like a Clarke-style footnote gone novel-length. That's my first thoughts, anyway.

Btw, some real Magician's Nephew vibes. I should create a list of Narnian send-ups to compare and contrast. This, Magicians, Golden Compass... any others?

One final small note, with spoiler tag I guess Arne-Sayles' whole predatory sexuality thing kind of really bummed me out, especially since the same thing, though more coded, was present with the Gentleman with Thistle-Down Hair in JS&MN. I feel like Susanna Clarke could do better. ( )
  misslevel | Sep 22, 2021 |
This short novel takes the form of the journal of a person living alone, save for one occasional visitor, in the House, which seems to be a labyrinthine structure on the sea. And I don't know that I can say much more about the plot or premise without spoiling things. Part of the appeal of the novel for me was in sitting with its weirdness and trying to decide if I thought Something Was, In Fact, Going On, or... not. I was deeply protective of (and a bit bemused by) the narrator almost at once, and I was engaged and entertained throughout. Recommended if fiction that's a bit strange sounds good to you. ( )
  lycomayflower | Sep 20, 2021 |
This is a bewitching and lovely book. It continually confounded my expectations and sent shivers down my spine. It lands beautifully too, without the ending spoiling anything that has gone before.

I had been re-reading Wolf Hall and was worried whatever I read next would seem flat in comparison but this was the perfect choice. It's a very spacious and calm book and also worked perfectly in the context of lockdown and isolation we've all been living through to one degree or another.

‘The Beauty of the House is immeasurable; its Kindness infinite’ ( )
  AlisonSakai | Sep 19, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 110 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Here it is worth reflecting on the subject of Clarke's overt homage. The historical Piranesi, an 18th-century engraver, is celebrated for his intricate and oppressive visions of imaginary prisons and his veduta ideate, precise renderings of classical edifices set amid fantastic vistas. Goethe, it is said, was so taken with these that he found the real Rome greatly disappointing. Clarke fuses these themes, seducing us with imaginative grandeur only to sweep that vision away, revealing the monstrosities to which we can not only succumb but wholly surrender ourselves.

The result is a remarkable feat, not just of craft but of reinvention. Far from seeming burdened by her legacy, the Clarke we encounter here might be an unusually gifted newcomer unacquainted with her namesake's work. If there is a strand of continuity in this elegant and singular novel, it is in its central pre-occupation with the nature of fantasy itself. It remains a potent force, but one that can leave us - like Goethe among the ruins - forever disappointed by what is real.
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (2 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Clarke, Susannaautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Ejiofor, ChiwetelNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Finke, AstridTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Mann, DavidDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Molnár, Berta EleonóraTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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"I am the great scholar, the magician, the adept, who is doing the experiment. Of course I need subjects to do it on".

The Magician's Nephew, C. S. Lewis
"People call me a philosopher or a scientist or an anthropologist. I am none of those things. I am an anamnesiologist. I study what has been forgotten. I divine what has disappeared utterly. I work with absences, with silences, with curious gaps between things. I am more of a magician than anything else."

Laurence Arne-Sayles, interview in The Secret Garden, May 1976
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For Colin
Primeres paraules
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When the Moon rose in the Third Northern Hall I went to the Ninth Vestibule to witness the joining of three Tides.
Citacions
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The Beauty of the House is immeasurable; its Kindness infinite.
Darreres paraules
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(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
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Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

Piranesi lives in the House. Perhaps he always has. In his notebooks, day after day, he makes a clear and careful record of its wonders: the labyrinth of halls, the thousands upon thousands of statues, the tides that thunder up staircases, the clouds that move in slow procession through the upper halls. On Tuesdays and Fridays Piranesi sees his friend, the Other. At other times he brings tributes of food and waterlilies to the Dead. But mostly, he is alone. Messages begin to appear, scratched out in chalk on the pavements. There is someone new in the House. But who are they and what do they want? Are they a friend or do they bring destruction and madness as the Other claims? Lost texts must be found; secrets must be uncovered. The world that Piranesi thought he knew is becoming strange and dangerous. The Beauty of the House is immeasurable ; its Kindness infinite.

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Melvil Decimal System (DDC)

823.92 — Literature English English fiction Modern Period 21st Century

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Mitjana: (4.23)
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