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The First Sister (1) (The First Sister…
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The First Sister (1) (The First Sister trilogy) (edició 2021)

de Linden A. Lewis (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
15611135,151 (3.84)1
"Combining the social commentary of The Handmaid's Tale with the white-knuckled thrills of Red Rising, this epic space opera follows a comfort woman as she claims her agency, a soldier questioning his allegiances, and a non-binary hero out to save the solar system. First Sister has no name and no voice. As a priestess of the Sisterhood, she travels the stars alongside the soldiers of Earth and Mars-the same ones who own the rights to her body and soul. When her former captain abandons her, First Sister's hopes for freedom are dashed when she is forced to stay on her ship with no friends, no power, and a new captain-Saito Ren-whom she knows nothing about. She is commanded to spy on Captain Ren by the Sisterhood, but soon discovers that working for the war effort is so much harder to do when you're falling in love. Lito val Lucius climbed his way out of the slums to become an elite soldier of Venus, but was defeated in combat by none other than Saito Ren, resulting in the disappearance of his partner, Hiro. When Lito learns that Hiro is both alive and now a traitor to the cause, he now has a shot at redemption: track down and kill his former partner. But when he discovers recordings that Hiro secretly made, Lito's own allegiances are put to the test. Ultimately, he must decide between following orders and following his heart. A stunning and sweeping debut novel that explores the power of technology, colonization, race, and gender, The First Sister is perfect for fans of James S.A. Corey, Chuck Wendig, and Margaret Atwood"--… (més)
Membre:JSPerkins
Títol:The First Sister (1) (The First Sister trilogy)
Autors:Linden A. Lewis (Autor)
Informació:Skybound Books (2021), 368 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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The First Sister de Linden A. Lewis

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Es mostren 1-5 de 11 (següent | mostra-les totes)
The first thing that struck me about The First Sister was the dark sci-fi setting that Lewis has created. Between grey-clad priestesses in spaceship chapels and Ironskin battle-suits, this novel has a vaguely gothic atmosphere that I love.

The second thing was that I had absolutely no idea where the story was going. I don’t necessarily mean in a plot-twisty way (though there are a couple of corkers), more so that I didn’t know what direction the book was taking until very late in the game.

This is partly down to the well-written blurb which (for once) doesn’t give too much away. It’s also a credit to Lewis’ flair for pacing and progressive worldbuilding. While The First Sister is more intimate and character-focused then I expected, Lewis’ imaginative and complex setting is slowly revealed throughout the book, adding further detail and scope.

The defining concept in this first instalment of The First Sister Trilogy is the Sisterhood and its representation of rape culture, which Lewis says was partly influenced by The Handmaid’s Tale and the #MeToo movement. It’s worth noting that there are no rape or sex scenes detailed in the book; the idea is portrayed more insidiously. Rather than focusing on individual perpetrators, Linden describes the unsettling control that government and religious organisations possess over individuals’ bodies, as well as the harm of a complacent society. This idea of a person’s body being violated by an institution is echoed throughout the story.

An interesting counterpoint to this theme is the fact that the Icarii, Geans and Asters are selectively inclusive – the queer characters in the story don’t face any discrimination for their gender or sexuality. This optimism perhaps makes this story a bit easier to digest, but also draws focus back to the idea of institution as villain, and tentatively suggests the possibility of social revolution.

The First Sister also draws focus to family relationships, the value we place on them, and the sacrifices we make for them. Among the several complex relationships in the book, I found the unique intimacy between Lito and Hiro particularly moving.

The First Sister is a relatively short sci-fi novel and I will admit there were a few aspects of the book that I wanted to continue learning about. However, it packs a punch, and I’m confident that these things will be further developed in subsequent books. It’s an impressive debut, and Lewis doesn’t shy away from challenges like writing a protagonist who can’t speak, or another who is developed mostly through a video transcript. ( )
  jakeisreading | May 23, 2021 |
he first thing that struck me about The First Sister was the dark sci-fi setting that Lewis has created. Between grey-clad priestesses in spaceship chapels and Ironskin battle-suits, this novel has a vaguely gothic atmosphere that I love.

The second thing was that I had absolutely no idea where the story was going. I don’t necessarily mean in a plot-twisty way (though there are a couple of corkers), more so that I didn’t know what direction the book was taking until very late in the game.

This is partly down to the well-written blurb which (for once) doesn’t give too much away. It’s also a credit to Lewis’ flair for pacing and progressive worldbuilding. While The First Sister is more intimate and character-focused then I expected, Lewis’ imaginative and complex setting is slowly revealed throughout the book, adding further detail and scope.

The defining concept in this first instalment of The First Sister Trilogy is the Sisterhood and its representation of rape culture, which Lewis says was partly influenced by The Handmaid’s Tale and the #MeToo movement. It’s worth noting that there are no rape or sex scenes detailed in the book; the idea is portrayed more insidiously. Rather than focusing on individual perpetrators, Linden describes the unsettling control that government and religious organisations possess over individuals’ bodies, as well as the harm of a complacent society. This idea of a person’s body being violated by an institution is echoed throughout the story.

An interesting counterpoint to this theme is the fact that the Icarii, Geans and Asters are selectively inclusive – the queer characters in the story don’t face any discrimination for their gender or sexuality. This optimism perhaps makes this story a bit easier to digest, but also draws focus back to the idea of institution as villain, and tentatively suggests the possibility of social revolution.

The First Sister also draws focus to family relationships, the value we place on them, and the sacrifices we make for them. Among the several complex relationships in the book, I found the unique intimacy between Lito and Hiro particularly moving.

The First Sister is a relatively short sci-fi novel and I will admit there were a few aspects of the book that I wanted to continue learning about. However, it packs a punch, and I’m confident that these things will be further developed in subsequent books. It’s an impressive debut, and Lewis doesn’t shy away from challenges like writing a protagonist who can’t speak, or another who is developed mostly through a video transcript. ( )
  jakeisreading | May 23, 2021 |
This was pitched as space opera with The Handmaid’s Tale, and that’s not inaccurate though it is aspirational. One main character is a silent Sister (they are silenced so that they can just listen to and support the soldiers who use them for confession and sexual access), while another is a fighter on the opposing side, whose own regime turns out to have its share of horrific tortures and injustices. It was a bit too crapsack world for me even though there is clearly some hope at the end. ( )
  rivkat | May 21, 2021 |
I won't mince words. This was more along the lines of a particularly good fanfiction than what I would call a "good book". The entire thing could have used a more harsh editing process, with about 20% of content scrapped to remove extraneous pieces that add bloat with no substance, fix some weird scene switching choices, and insist upon more careful and deliberate vocabulary choices. I'm not kidding when I say that the phrase "sharp as a mercurial blade" was said SO MANY TIMES by one character that I briefly toyed with the idea that it was foreshadowing him being mentally unstable and hyperfixating on the phrase. Alas, no luck. It was simply overused to the point of insanity. In addition, the first sister "trembles" so much she may as well be a leaf or a particularly nervous chihuahua.

THAT BEING SAID. I think that this book shows a lot of promise for the writer for me. I see that they don't have very many books attributed to them so it's only natural that they could use some additional time to really refine what they've started here. I don't think "good fanfiction" is an insult in the slightest, I think it's high praise and the best place someone could start.

I think some other reviews both praise and criticize it for weird or unnecessary reasons. This book has some fantastic queer rep, but that rep doesn't make up for the poor writing choices. Similarly but opposite, this book has terrible things happen to queer characters and I think that's perfectly fine. The whole book is nothing BUT queer characters, and those characters are in a war. Bad things are going to happen to them.

Additionally there IS gendered violence in this book. Personally, I don't mind that some stories have gendered violence. It's a topic that happens to people, so it's a topic some people will write about. I won't fault anyone for not liking the topic, but I don't think it's inclusion is the reason the book suffers.

One thing that I did think was weird was the references to various character's heritages. The Spanish and Japanese characters reference their own races in a forced and unnatural way I can only describe as "cringy". With random bits of their native languages used in unnatural ways, and only the very top of cultural stereotypes mentioned (this is one of the pieces that feels very "fanfiction"). Now, maybe the author has had a different experience than I have, but I've literally never heard any multicultural people speak or act the way these people speak and act. There are other, better ways to do what they're trying for here.

The titular "first sister" is a frustrating POV character. She is, for 90% of the book, the single most reactionary character I have ever witnessed in ANY media. This makes complete sense for her background, but it is still very likely to kill many a reader's enjoyment of the story. As I mentioned earlier, she is constantly "trembling", crying, trying to hide that she wants to cry, etc. For all her internal monologuing about the rigorous training to hide their emotions the sisters go through, she sure does seem to be absolute shit at doing it.

This book will not please science fiction fans that are looking for a book focusing on the science fiction itself. It is, at its core, a war romance set in a science fiction setting. NOT a science fiction book. Personally, I liked the way the setting was revealed piece by piece via the characters. It was one of the book's strengths.

Other things that I liked were plotlines driven by "second love" stories, a topic that is in sore need of attention. The book also has several very interesting and multifaceted characters, with a whole range of motivations and backgrounds. I enjoyed this book's take on space life, and would happily read a...different series in this setting. The story, while not the best written, is still and entertaining story.

So yeah, overall I'd say that if you're a fan of good fanfiction give it a read. But if you're looking for something more fine tuned, give it a pass. ( )
  shotagofish | May 3, 2021 |
An interesting sci-fi world, with good character work. Its a very well-paced story, though it did leave me with unanswered questions about the plot and the world, and hopefully they get answered in the sequels. ( )
  Andorion | Feb 6, 2021 |
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"Combining the social commentary of The Handmaid's Tale with the white-knuckled thrills of Red Rising, this epic space opera follows a comfort woman as she claims her agency, a soldier questioning his allegiances, and a non-binary hero out to save the solar system. First Sister has no name and no voice. As a priestess of the Sisterhood, she travels the stars alongside the soldiers of Earth and Mars-the same ones who own the rights to her body and soul. When her former captain abandons her, First Sister's hopes for freedom are dashed when she is forced to stay on her ship with no friends, no power, and a new captain-Saito Ren-whom she knows nothing about. She is commanded to spy on Captain Ren by the Sisterhood, but soon discovers that working for the war effort is so much harder to do when you're falling in love. Lito val Lucius climbed his way out of the slums to become an elite soldier of Venus, but was defeated in combat by none other than Saito Ren, resulting in the disappearance of his partner, Hiro. When Lito learns that Hiro is both alive and now a traitor to the cause, he now has a shot at redemption: track down and kill his former partner. But when he discovers recordings that Hiro secretly made, Lito's own allegiances are put to the test. Ultimately, he must decide between following orders and following his heart. A stunning and sweeping debut novel that explores the power of technology, colonization, race, and gender, The First Sister is perfect for fans of James S.A. Corey, Chuck Wendig, and Margaret Atwood"--

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