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Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars. de Joyce…
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Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars. (2020 original; edició 2020)

de Joyce Carol Oates (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
13916163,276 (3.82)8
The bonds of family are tested in the wake of a profound tragedy, providing a look at the darker side of our society by one of our most enduringly popular and important writers Night Sleep Death The Stars is a gripping examination of contemporary America through the prism of a family tragedy: when a powerful parent dies, each of his adult children reacts in startling and unexpected ways, and his grieving widow in the most surprising way of all. Stark and penetrating, Joyce Carol Oates's latest novel is a vivid exploration of race, psychological trauma, class warfare, grief, and eventual healing, as well as an intimate family novel in the tradition of the author's bestselling We Were the Mulvaneys.… (més)
Membre:Chitralekhakumar
Títol:Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars.
Autors:Joyce Carol Oates (Autor)
Informació:Fourth Estate (2020), 928 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca, Per llegir
Valoració:
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Informació de l'obra

Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars. de Joyce Carol Oates (2020)

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» Mira també 8 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 16 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Family. Race. Turmoil. Evolution.

When prominent Hammond, NY, citizen, its former mayor in fact, comes upon what he views as an injustice in progress, a brown man being abused by two white police officers, he steps in. Angered by his interference, the officers turn on him, beating and tasering him relentlessly. After, they release the man they’d stopped for nothing more than suspicion of driving black, call 911, and leave John Earle McClaren by the side of the road. Thus begins Joyce Carol Oates’ saga of a family thrown into turmoil as they deal with the loss of their patriarch, as well as racism inherent in American life, for not even this man and his family are immune to it, regardless of John Earle’s selfless sacrifice.

Even in death, John Earle continues to exert a powerful influence over his family of six, wife Jessalyn, sons Thom and Virgil, and daughters Beverly, Lorene, and Sophia, as each comes to terms with his death. As they do, the essence of their characters, long held in abeyance by John Earle’s dominant presence, surface, spurring conflict among them and for their various careers as businessman, artist, homemaker, school administrator, and researcher, respectively. And then there are their various relationships with their mother as they watch her struggle with her overwhelming grief, but even more, their concern and near abhorrence of the emergence of something she’d lost in her marriage, her agency as an independent person. This concern as it regards the new man who enters her life exposes both the racism and class prejudice ingrained in each family member, and by extension American society in general.

Most readers familiar with Oates’ work and life know that the unexpected death of her first husband, author, publisher, and professor Raymond Smith, affected her deeply, plunging her into the depths of depression for six months, until she met Charles Gross, whom she married and who died in 2019. She wrote about her life with and emotional loss of Smith in A Widow's Story: A Memoir. So it will be no surprise that among the strongest parts of Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars. are those involving Jessalyn. In some important ways, including the suddenness of John Earle’s death, the depths of Jessalyn’s grief and despair, and her meeting and marriage to another man different from her first husband relatively soon into widowhood, parallel Oates’ own life, adding even more authenticity to the character of Jessalyn.

JCO fans will greatly enjoy this new novel, especially the epic length, as she is never more effective than when she is eating up lots of landscape. Most readers will find the novel an absorbing, and if they allow it, a thought provoking excursion not only into family dynamics but into the most crucial societal issue in American history.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Family. Race. Turmoil. Evolution.

When prominent Hammond, NY, citizen, its former mayor in fact, comes upon what he views as an injustice in progress, a brown man being abused by two white police officers, he steps in. Angered by his interference, the officers turn on him, beating and tasering him relentlessly. After, they release the man they’d stopped for nothing more than suspicion of driving black, call 911, and leave John Earle McClaren by the side of the road. Thus begins Joyce Carol Oates’ saga of a family thrown into turmoil as they deal with the loss of their patriarch, as well as racism inherent in American life, for not even this man and his family are immune to it, regardless of John Earle’s selfless sacrifice.

Even in death, John Earle continues to exert a powerful influence over his family of six, wife Jessalyn, sons Thom and Virgil, and daughters Beverly, Lorene, and Sophia, as each comes to terms with his death. As they do, the essence of their characters, long held in abeyance by John Earle’s dominant presence, surface, spurring conflict among them and for their various careers as businessman, artist, homemaker, school administrator, and researcher, respectively. And then there are their various relationships with their mother as they watch her struggle with her overwhelming grief, but even more, their concern and near abhorrence of the emergence of something she’d lost in her marriage, her agency as an independent person. This concern as it regards the new man who enters her life exposes both the racism and class prejudice ingrained in each family member, and by extension American society in general.

Most readers familiar with Oates’ work and life know that the unexpected death of her first husband, author, publisher, and professor Raymond Smith, affected her deeply, plunging her into the depths of depression for six months, until she met Charles Gross, whom she married and who died in 2019. She wrote about her life with and emotional loss of Smith in A Widow's Story: A Memoir. So it will be no surprise that among the strongest parts of Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars. are those involving Jessalyn. In some important ways, including the suddenness of John Earle’s death, the depths of Jessalyn’s grief and despair, and her meeting and marriage to another man different from her first husband relatively soon into widowhood, parallel Oates’ own life, adding even more authenticity to the character of Jessalyn.

JCO fans will greatly enjoy this new novel, especially the epic length, as she is never more effective than when she is eating up lots of landscape. Most readers will find the novel an absorbing, and if they allow it, a thought provoking excursion not only into family dynamics but into the most crucial societal issue in American history.
( )
  write-review | Nov 4, 2021 |
Many decades ago I read two books by Oates, Black Water and Because It Is Bitter, Because It’s My Heart. Then I forgot about her, even though I liked the two books I’d read. Now I’ve finished her 800-page 59th novel in 5 days and thought it was excellent—as writing, as story, as satire. It revolves around as act of police brutality and a family tragedy, and has a certain ripped-from-the-headlines flavor. Even more so it is about privilege and casual racism, family lies and myths and everyone’s struggle to get free.

I liked this review:

https://chireviewofbooks.com/2020/06/16/shadows-of-consciousness-in-night-sleep-... ( )
  jdukuray | Jun 23, 2021 |
Joyce Carol Oates, one of my favorite authors, has written another sweeping family epic, much like her well known novel “We Were the Mulvaney’s”. We witness firsthand a once stable family collapse after the death of the patriarch of the family. ⁣
Unlike “We Were The Mulvaney’s” though, I struggled to finish this one. I was intrigued at the beginning of the novel, when we meet the much lauded Whitey McLaren, and then become a bystander to a vicious crime and his ultimate demise. I love books that have alternating character viewpoints, and we get several here, with the surviving members of the McLaren family: the matriarch Jessalyn, and their children Thom, Beverly, Lorene, Sophia, and Virgil. Each chapter is a detailed & lengthy glimpse into their lives before, during, and after the tragedy that has befallen them. ⁣
I feel guilty because of how much I love Ms. Oates and her previous works, and I tried to enjoy this book more, but it honestly became a chore to read it and the reason it took me over a month to complete it. Much of the prose in the chapters, particularly Jessalyn’s, were much too long. As a frequent reader of Oates’s work I’m accustomed to her unique style of prose, but after a while it grew tiring. Although I did feel quite sorry for Jessalyn as a character not only because of her husband’s passing, but mainly because her children, (especially Thom, Beverly, and Lorene) were so vile. They had no redeeming qualities and their chapters revealed more of the same. I much preferred Sophia and Virgil and looked forward to reading their chapters. ⁣
Despite not enjoying this one, I do eagerly look forward to Ms. Oates’s next book. If this is your first time reading this author, I would recommend skipping this one and picking up “We Were the Mulvaney’s” & “The Hazards of Time Travel” instead. ( )
  brookiexlicious | May 5, 2021 |
I wouldn't exactly call myself a big Joyce Carol Oates fan, but somehow I've managed to read four or five of her novels. I think of her as one of those writers that you check in periodically just to see if your opinion of them has changed. "Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars." has its good points, but I'm not sure that I'm really in tune with Ms. Oates these days.

I think it's fair to say that JCO might be our finest graphomaniac. She's basically a one-woman novel factory, and whatever virtues she has as a writer, concision isn't one of them. She tells a good story here, but this thing is eight hundred pages long! Oates also isn't terribly interested in obscuring the themes she's addressing, there are a lot of sentences here that are too on-the-nose. I hate to criticize such an established author, but sometimes I wish that Oates wouldn't address the issues she's dealing with so directly.

"Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars." is, like a lot of other novels by this author, a very contemporary affair, one that speaks directly to the issues of the day. It addresses police brutality, racial tension, wealth inequality as they play out in the familiar Oatsian setting of upstate New York. It's all very "Law and Order." I'm sure there are readers who will find the book's depiction of its more conservative, bourgeious characters less than subtle, but Oates, especially at the end of the novel, does manage to turn these very of-the-moment concerns into a way to talk about larger, more universal themes. It's something that not every writer could do.

Lastly, whatever issues I might have with the perhaps too conventional way that this novel's written, it's clear that Joyce Carol Oates has got the talent that is perhaps most essential for writing good fiction: the ability to make her characters seem like living, breathing people. Even her less sympathetic characters seem wonderfully believable, and I finished this perhaps overlong novel specifically because I wanted to see how they ended up. So maybe this wasn't my cup of tea. Maybe Joyce and I need to spend some time apart! But this is still a pretty good novel. ( )
  TheAmpersand | Apr 18, 2021 |
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The bonds of family are tested in the wake of a profound tragedy, providing a look at the darker side of our society by one of our most enduringly popular and important writers Night Sleep Death The Stars is a gripping examination of contemporary America through the prism of a family tragedy: when a powerful parent dies, each of his adult children reacts in startling and unexpected ways, and his grieving widow in the most surprising way of all. Stark and penetrating, Joyce Carol Oates's latest novel is a vivid exploration of race, psychological trauma, class warfare, grief, and eventual healing, as well as an intimate family novel in the tradition of the author's bestselling We Were the Mulvaneys.

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