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The Kingdom: A novel de Jo Nesbo
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The Kingdom: A novel (edició 2020)

de Jo Nesbo (Autor), Robert Ferguson (Traductor)

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1308158,709 (3.73)No n'hi ha cap
Membre:Twinmountain
Títol:The Kingdom: A novel
Autors:Jo Nesbo (Autor)
Altres autors:Robert Ferguson (Traductor)
Informació:Knopf (2020), 560 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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The Kingdom de Jo Nesbo

Afegit fa poc perldbuck, fabianEr, bgottry, 66usma, biblioteca privada, scmuther1215, pjdscca, Orphanblackcloner, alizarin

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This book is a lot of pages (effort) to learn that "blood is thicker than water" and "familiar love is stronger than romantic love." Not much to this one. Of course, it is Nesbo, so the journey goes along fairly easily. ( )
  ghefferon | Dec 21, 2020 |
A stand alone from Jo Nesbo.

There are plenty of little mysteries in this novel, not the least of which who is responsible for each entry in the growing death toll. There are secrets that no-one talks about.

Roy and Carl are the children of a "mixed" marriage: the father is American. To some extent the family is dysfunctional, the father violent, the mother ignoring what she doesn't want to admit observing, and Roy, the older, always protective of his younger brother, but sometimes powerless to do anything.

Roy has inherited the violent streak from his father, and often solves Carl's problems with his fists. Their parents die when they are just teenagers and they are watched over by an uncle. Eventually Carl, the more academic of the two goes off to America to university. Over a decade later he comes back with a beautiful wife in tow, who just happens to be an architect, and that is where the real trouble starts.

An engrossing but very long novel that explores the relationships between the trio and with those from the village who have been part of Roy and Carl's life for decades. ( )
  smik | Dec 8, 2020 |
Set in a Norwegian mountain village a story of both brotherhood hatred and murder. Mountain roads and old American cars. ( )
  waldhaus1 | Nov 20, 2020 |
This example of Nordic Noir is written by the creator of the Harry Hole series, but this book is very different. It is a crime novel but it is also very much a family drama focusing on the bond between brothers.

When he is 15 years old, Roy Opgard is told by his father that he must always look after his younger brother Carl: “’You and me, we’re alike, Roy. We’re tougher than people like Mum and Carl. So we have to look after them. Always. . . . We’re family. We’ve got each other and nobody else. Friends, sweethearts, neighbours, the locals, the state. All that’s an illusion, it’s not worth a candle the day something really matters. Then it’s us against them, Roy. Us against absolutely everybody else.’” Roy takes seriously the responsibility to protect his brother, especially after they are orphaned. Carl gets into trouble and Roy rushes in to help and clean up the mess. Once Carl leaves for North America, Roy focuses on managing a gas station in the small village of Os and living a quiet life on the mountain farm his father called The Kingdom. Then, 15 years later, Carl returns with Shannon, his architect wife. The two have big plans to build a mountain resort, though the sketchy financing plan necessitates the involvement of virtually every villager. It quickly becomes clear that Roy will have to revert to his role as protector: “I suspected the reason for this sudden and unannounced homecoming was . . . [that] he needed his big brother’s help.” More than once, Roy is faced with having to decide how much he is willing to do to help Carl.

Almost from the beginning it is obvious that both boys suffered trauma in their childhoods, trauma which has had a lasting emotional impact. Of course, this trauma has been kept a secret from everyone, though it seems some people in the village have suspicions. Even the reader is initially kept in the dark as to exactly what happened. However, when that first secret is revealed, it emerges that there are other secrets - in fact, layers of secrets and lies. At times, the number of secrets becomes almost overwhelming.

The two brothers are foil characters. Roy, the narrator, is an introvert and loner; his ambition is to own his own service station. He has a strong sense of duty, and his love for and loyalty to his brother are obvious; he feels he has incurred a debt to his brother which “I was going to have to go on paying until I died.” Carl is the extrovert, a social charmer. He dreams on a large scale, though his impulsive nature often gets him into trouble. The two work together when necessary, but Roy begins to mistrust his brother when he learns that Carl is not always completely truthful and forthcoming. There is also underlying jealousy; Roy admits, “’I’ve been jealous [of Carl] since I was five years old.’” The complexity of the relationship between the two creates suspense. We know Roy doesn’t fully trust Carl, but does Carl completely trust his brother?

This is a lengthy novel and it starts slowly. Then the pace picks up and the reader will be breathing quickly because of the many twists and turns: “Almost nothing is impossible. It’s just a question of time, and then everything happens.” Unfortunately, I did find myself shaking my head in disbelief after a while because there’s “a pile of wrecked cars and corpses that just grew and grew.”

The book does urge readers to consider what they would do to protect family. Roy and Carl’s father says, “’It is the ability not to take the path of least resistance but the path of highest morality that separates humans from animals’” but suggests that they may have to be collateral damage, “unintentional fatalities, but necessary” in a war endangering family. Shannon points out, “’morality as a motivating force is overrated in us humans. . . . We shape morality so that it suits our purposes when we feel our group is under threat. Family vendettas and genocides throughout history are not the work of monsters but of human beings like us who believed they were acting in a way that was morally correct.’” She admits, “’I love the ones I love and do what I have to in order to protect them. Even if that means doing bad things.’” Would you?

This dark and atmospheric novel has interesting characters with both internal and external conflicts. Once tension begins, there’s little lessening. It engages the reader in questions of morality and responsibility for and loyalty to family. The amount of betrayal, obsession and violence stretches credibility but would work well in an action-packed film adaptation.

Note: I received an eARC from the publisher via NetGalley.

Please check out my reader's blog (https://schatjesshelves.blogspot.com/) and follow me on Twitter (@DCYakabuski). ( )
  Schatje | Nov 14, 2020 |
The Kingdom by Jo Nesbo is a very highly recommended twisty, dark, standalone thriller. Once you start it, this one is un-put-down-able.

As they were growing up Roy Opgard has always been there to look after and defend his younger brother, Carl. Roy is a mechanic who currently runs a service station, with hopes to own his own station someday. Carl went off to college in the USA and then went to work in Canada where he had great success. Carl is now coming back to Os, the remote Norwegian village where he grew up with Roy. He arrives with a wife, Shannon Alleyne, and plans to build a resort and spa on the mountain that the brother's jointly own. These two brothers have a dark past and are survivors.

This is an absolutely riveting thriller and Nesbo's writing will expertly play on all your emotions with his narrative slight of hand. As old secrets are slowly exposed, it also becomes clear that the brothers need to make more plans. Make no mistake that it is also an unsettling, disturbing novel where violence, suspicious accidents, and abuse are prevalent. The tension and trepidation continues to grow and spread out as each part of the narrative unfolds.

There are several mysteries hidden in the novel and the tale of each one will eventually be told. Since the setting is a small town, everyone's secrets and history often come back to light. Os seems a small, insular, provincial place where past and present actions are always noted and remembered. I am in awe of how carefully Nesbo plotted this novel and allowed Roy, the narrator tell the story. Just when I thought one thing was true, I'd learn a few chapters later that it was another thing altogether.

Roy, as mentioned, narrates the novel, tells the stories, and explains his complex relationship to his brother, Carl. Roy is a complicated character and since he is the rather reticent narrator we very slowly learn more about him, his past, and the secrets he holds. He also has a great capacity for violence, but he is also logical to a fault. Towns people consider his a decent man, although Roy might disagree.

After a slow but steady plot advancement throughout the whole novel, the final denouement is shocking, surprising, and unforeseen. Dark, disturbing, and utterly engrossing, I was seized by the compelling, intricate plot and held captive until the end. This is a contender for my favorite books of the year.
Disclosure: My review copy was courtesy of Knopf Doubleday .
http://www.shetreadssoftly.com/2020/11/the-kingdom.html
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/3639822580 ( )
  SheTreadsSoftly | Nov 11, 2020 |
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Ferguson, RobertTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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