IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Mis rincones oscuros de James Ellroy
S'està carregant…

Mis rincones oscuros (1996 original; edició 2000)

de James Ellroy

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,476159,595 (3.85)60
Jean Ellroy was murdered in 1958. Her body was dumped on a roadway in a run-down L.A. suburb. The killer was never found. The case was closed. It was a sordid back-page homicide that nobody remembered. Except her son. James Ellroy was ten years old when his mother died. His bereavement was complex and ambiguous. He grew up obsessed with murdered women and crime. His life spun hellishly out of control. He ran from the ghost of Jean Ellroy. He became a writer of radically provocative and best-selling crime novels. He tried to reclaim his mother through fiction. It didn't work. He quit running and wrote this memoir.My Dark Places is Jean Ellroy's and James Ellroy's story - from 1958 to all points past and up to this moment. It is the story of a brilliant homicide detective named Bill Stoner, and of the investigation he and James Ellroy undertook to find Jean Ellroy's killer. My Dark Places is unflinching autobiography and vivid reportage. It is no less than a treatise on 38 years of American murder. It is James Ellroy's journey into and through his most forbidding memories.… (més)
Membre:luiska_303
Títol:Mis rincones oscuros
Autors:James Ellroy
Informació:Barcelona Ediciones B 2000
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Informació de l'obra

My Dark Places de James Ellroy (1996)

  1. 00
    Crane: Sex, Celebrity, and My Father's Unsolved Murder (Screen Classics) de Robert Crane (SnootyBaronet)
  2. 00
    Son of a Gun: A Memoir de Justin St. Germain (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Another memoir by a son who lost his mother to murder, this is less a mystery to be solved than a deeper exploration on the impact her death had on him.
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 60 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 15 (següent | mostra-les totes)
James Elroy carved out a place for himself with a unique voice and a keen eye for a nostalgic, if bloody, tinged Los Angeles. Turns out the seeds of that aesthetic were sown in the childhood loss of his mother in a very violent homicide. He reexamines the cold case several decades later, after the success of his work. The most interesting things in the book were his minutely detailed description of how law enforcement worked homicides in the '50s and handled cold cases in the decades following, and the descriptions of Los Angeles. The least interesting thing was the personal side of the equation, which was a surprise. Throughout, he seems detached from his mother's murder and his own squalid youth. Not as good as I'd expected, especially after enjoying some of his fiction. ( )
  blackdogbooks | Nov 28, 2021 |
I was thinking about writing a review of this book, when by coincidence I saw a claim made on social media. It was that those labelled "far right extremists" have in fact many positive attributes, one of which is "aversion to drugs, alcohol and pornography."

The book was half a century ago, but if things haven't changed too much, it gives lie to the claim, as far as one person is concerned, anyway.

Ellroy's book is part autobiography, part investigation into his mother's murder. It's interesting for his account of his early life as a burglar, drug addict, listener to right—wing radio shows, and what these days might be called an edgelord:

"The early '60s were good comic fodder. I took contrary stands on the A-bomb, John Kennedy, civil rights and the Berlin Wall brouhaha. I yelled' Free Rudolph Hess! ' and advocated the reinstalment of slavery.
... I invited a few kids to my pad- and watched them recoil at the stench of dogshit. I tried to conform to their standards of normal behaviour and betrayed myself with foul language, poor hygiene and expressed admiration for George Lincoln Rockwell and the American Nazi Party. "(pp. 119-121)

As it turned out, Ellroy got himself together, cleaned up his lifestyle, and became a successful novelist. From the book it seems two things helped him. Firstly, religion, and secondly, a structured abstinence programme/meetings:

"I knew that booze, drugs, and my tenuous abstention from them caused my brain burnout. My rational side told me that. My secondary response derived straight from guilt. God punished me for mentally fucking my mother.
... My lung abscess healed completely. I checked out of the hospital and cut a deal with God.
I told him I wouldn't drink or pop inhalers. I told him I wouldn't steal. All I wanted was my mind back for keeps.
The deal jelled. "
(pp. 160-161)

" I was hungry. I wanted love and sex. I wanted to give my mental stories to the world.
... Lloyd cleaned up in AA. He told me total abstinence was better than booze and dope at its best. I believed him. He was always smarter and stronger and more resourceful than me.
I followed his lead. I said "Fuck it" and shrugged off my old life. "
-p. 164

Early parts of the book make for an unusual crime memoir. There's none of the usual self-aggrandising gangster bullshit of the genre. Instead, in jail:
"I hung out with stupid white guys, stupid black guys and stupid Mexican guys - and swapped stupid stories with them. We had all committed daring crimes and fucked the world's most glamorous women. An old black wino told me he fucked Marilyn Monroe. I said, "No shit-I fucked her too!"
(p. 154)

Even without the murder it's a sad story.
" My mother was drinking more. She'd crank highballs at night and get pissed off, maudlin or effusive. I found her in bed with men a couple of times. The guys had that '50s lounge-lizard look. They probably sold used cars or repossessed them.
... My parents were unable to talk in a civil fashion. They did not exchange words under any circumstances. Their expressions of hatred were reserved for me: He's a weakling; she's a drunk and a whore. I believed him - and wrote her accusations off as hogwash. I was blind to the fact that her accusations carried a greater basis in truth. "
-p. 95 ( )
  George_Stokoe | Mar 22, 2021 |
My Dark Places is a memoir as only James Ellroy can write one.

The book comprises three sections—the first is a third-person narrative of his mother’s murder in 1958 and the criminal investigation that failed to solve the crime. For the second part, Mr. Ellroy switches to a first-person POV and tells us the story of his troubled youth and young adulthood. The third, concluding section maintains the first-person perspective and recounts how Mr. Ellroy teamed up with a retired homicide detective to reopen his mother’s murder case 30 years later and search for better answers.

Each section on its own is compelling. Taken together—they don’t quite fit. As a whole, this book feels discordant, as though the author hasn’t entirely figured out what he wants to do with these threads.

This sense of disconnection is entirely appropriate. His mother’s murder determined the course of his life, in ways large and small, and he spent much of his life running from the truth of that fact. This is the story of his quest to finally figure out what her murder means, to define the shape and echoes of that event, to determine how that truth fits.

I admire that Mr. Ellroy has the courage to publish a book without fully knowing the answer.

Stylistically, this book has some failings. In the final part of the work, he devotes a great deal of time to an account of a different murder that’s only tangentially related to his mother’s. It’s frustrating. It scatters focus.

Mr. Ellroy’s distinctive writing style works exceptionally well when he describes murder scenes and investigations. When he writes about his truant childhood and his drug-addled young adulthood as a petty criminal, his style becomes reminiscent of Hunter S. Thompson—either Mr. Ellroy is admirably self-aware and brutally honest, or he equals Mr. Thompson’s talent for sheer self-aggrandizement. Or both.

He never finds a fully effective voice for the first-person parts of the story, particularly when it comes to reopening the investigation of his mother’s murder. The patented Ellroy writing style, which gives his fiction its unique character, comes off as gimmicky and false when applied to such a personal story.

Mr. Ellroy makes no bones of the fact that the antiheroes of his fiction are transposed versions of himself. In this memoir, he writes himself as one of his antiheroes—and it doesn’t ring true. The tough and jaded persona of Mr. Ellroy-as-antihero admits too little vulnerability, it dehumanizes him in those moments when the reader needs most to relate to him on an essentially human level.

Mr. Ellroy’s fictional work is built on grand narrative principles—he has strong convictions regarding the inner workings of the criminal psyche, of how the darkest parts of our world work. These convictions lend his fiction tremendous resonance and power, it’s what allows him to dredge in the muck of the underbelly of mankind and transmogrify it into something universal and sublime.

Applied to the tale of his own life, these convictions border on facile—pat answers to the complexity and ambiguity of real human relationships. Insights meant to be profound and illuminating come off as rather pathetic and obvious cookie-cutter amateur psychology. Grand principle becomes oversimplification, and it comes off as an essential inability to face the hard and complicated truth of the real world.

He works so hard to make everything about his life the sublimated aftereffects of his mother, it leaves no room for subtlety or nuance. This is not to say that his conclusions aren't valid, but he beats at the theme with a sledgehammer, rather than chipping away at it like a sculptor.

In a memoir such as this, his typical grand narrative principles constrict. They force the story to fit his preconceived ideas, rather than allowing it be fully personal. These conceits substantially blunt what should be a more deeply moving tale.

In the end, this is an interesting memoir specifically for the fact that no one but Mr. Ellroy could write one quite like it. As an insight into his mind and his obsessions, this work clearly holds interest for Ellroy fans. It’s a fascinating tale, all told, and My Dark Places is worth the read. But it tries too hard to be an Ellroy novel when it should be a more intimate and honest story.

This isn't an Ellroy masterpiece. ( )
  johnthelibrarian | Aug 11, 2020 |
Too long and goes nowhere. ( )
  Stubb | Aug 28, 2018 |
Varios meses sufri las idas y venidas de la investgacion de Ellroy .

Muchas historias pertubadoras sobre crimenes paralelos a la pelirroja Jean . Muchas mujeres muertas solo por el hecho de ser mujeres . MUchos hombres que impusieron crueldad solamente porque podian , porque la sociedad lo permitia . Muchas , interminables injusticias que ELlroy explora sin esconder detalles . Mucha maldad , machismo y violencia de genero que brota por los poros del mundo y en particular , en esta nacion violenta que recorre el autor de viaje en viaje . Aca estan esos horrores documentados con la imparcialidad de un ajeno al dolor ; es eso , es lo explicito , la honestidad brutal que hace que este recuento de evidencias y hechos , mentiras y verdades , sea la excelencia que es .

ELLROY X ELLROY . COn todas sus rarezas y todos sus defectos , que sin querer queriendo da catedra sobre quienes son las oprimidas y las victimas de siempre . Y como la gente se acosumbra a que lo sean ( y eso es lo peor de todo , no?)

---------------------------------




Estoy en una racha de crimenes sin resolver que no puedo parar ( La mujer de Isdal , Mary Rogers , el caso Taman Shud , ENTRE OTROS apasionantes misterios sin resolver de esos que te sacan el sueño...) y cai en esta autobiografia del autor de L.A. CONFIDENTIAL , cuya madre ES un cold case .

Veamos que tal esta ... ( )
  LaMala | Jun 7, 2015 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 15 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
To Helen Knode
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en neerlandès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Een paar jongens hebben haar gevonden.
Het slachtoffer was een vierentwintigjarige blonde vrouw.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en neerlandès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en italià. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (1)

Jean Ellroy was murdered in 1958. Her body was dumped on a roadway in a run-down L.A. suburb. The killer was never found. The case was closed. It was a sordid back-page homicide that nobody remembered. Except her son. James Ellroy was ten years old when his mother died. His bereavement was complex and ambiguous. He grew up obsessed with murdered women and crime. His life spun hellishly out of control. He ran from the ghost of Jean Ellroy. He became a writer of radically provocative and best-selling crime novels. He tried to reclaim his mother through fiction. It didn't work. He quit running and wrote this memoir.My Dark Places is Jean Ellroy's and James Ellroy's story - from 1958 to all points past and up to this moment. It is the story of a brilliant homicide detective named Bill Stoner, and of the investigation he and James Ellroy undertook to find Jean Ellroy's killer. My Dark Places is unflinching autobiography and vivid reportage. It is no less than a treatise on 38 years of American murder. It is James Ellroy's journey into and through his most forbidding memories.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.85)
0.5
1 3
1.5 2
2 13
2.5 4
3 66
3.5 14
4 124
4.5 16
5 66

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 164,582,128 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible