IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Hopi Tales of Destruction de Ekkehart…
S'està carregant…

Hopi Tales of Destruction (edició 2002)

de Ekkehart Malotki (Editor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses
1721,059,915 (4.5)Cap
Hopi Tales of Destruction preserves seven powerful tales about ancient Hopi villages thatnbsp;now lie in ruins. These narratives shed considerable light on the Hopis' past, giving insight into cultural values and social motivations beyond the ability of archaeology. The tales concern such villages as Sikyatki, Hisatsongoopavi, and Awat'ovi, which were destroyed by war, fire, earthquake, or internal strife. Though abandoned for centuries, they live in memory, reminders of ancient tragedies and enmities that changed the Hopis forever. Related by storytellers from Second and Third Mesa, these tales vividly describe village destruction and show how much human evils such as witchcraft, hubris, corruption, and betrayal of fundamental values can precipitate social disintegration and chaos. Ekkehart Malotki, who collected the original tales in the Hopi vernacular, has carefully edited and translated the tales in this special English-language edition. His introduction, notes, and a glossary reveal what historical and archaeological research has pieced together about the villages and correlates the stories with other legends.… (més)
Membre:ToddBlair
Títol:Hopi Tales of Destruction
Autors:Ekkehart Malotki (Editor)
Informació:BISON ORIGINAL (2002), 230 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

Hopi Tales of Destruction de Ekkehart Malotki

Cap
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

Es mostren totes 2
HopI Tales of Destruction is a collection of legends narrated by Michael Lomatuway’ma, Lorena Lomatuway’ma, and Sidney Namingha Jr, and translated by Ekkehart Malotki. As you might guess from the title, each story features some dramatic act of devastation. Malotki has also provided helpful commentary before each story, placing the story in the context of oral traditions in general, and Hopi oral traditions in specific, as well as linking to available archeological or historical information.

Like two other books I have read recently, Wooden Leg and Geronimo's Story of His Life, Hopi Tales of Destruction is an opportunity to hear someone’s story in their own words, albeit with a necessary filter of translation.

Unlike the other two books, this volume is not autobiographical, but a documentation of the kind of stories that were told for entertainment and edification by the Hopi. Seven tales are collected here, enough to give some idea of the different kinds of stories that were told about villages or people that came to ruin, and also to see the similarities and themes that unite these particular kinds of stories.

The overarching theme of all these stories is that moral dissolution eventually leads to destruction. Koyaaniqatsi is the Hopi word that describes this state: a life of turmoil and disorder. How this comes about varies a bit in the stories. The village of Hisatsongopaavi comes to ruin because of an attempt to convince the water serpents that lived in the nearby spring to flatten the cliffs into usable farmland. Pivanhonkyapi, on the other hand, is destroyed by a firestorm from the southwest called down by a leader who is saddened that his people have fallen into a life of pleasure-seeking.

Two of the stories collected here refer to a firestorm coming from the southwest, perhaps an echo of the eruption of Sunset Crater in the 11th century AD. Malotki and Michael Lomatuway’ma have another volume specifically about that event, Earth Fire, but the descriptions in the stories here are strikingly similar, of fire shooting up into the sky near Nuvatukya’ovi [San Francisco Peaks].

Another interesting element is Palangwu, the home of the sorcerers far to the northeast. Sorcerers are said to extend their life by stealing the heart of a relative and placing it into a jar at Palangwu. A similar story was used by Jerry Pournelle and Larry Niven in Burning Tower, locating the ur-heimat of the Uto-Aztecans in the San Juan river valley to the northeast the Hopi Pueblos, and featuring an immortal Emperor who extends his life by taking hearts and placing them in jars.

The final story in this volume, and the reason I asked for a copy of this book, is the annihilation of Awat’ovi. This story, as noted by Malotki, is quite different in structure than the other six, possibly because the events are so recent. The story is in two parts, the first is told in a manner very much like the rest, with a standard structure and references to legendary figures. The second part gets oddly specific, shifting from complaints about sorcerers to ones about the Spanish, and featuring details of a conspiracy amongst the other Hopi villages to destroy Awat’ovi and massacre all of its inhabitants.

The ruins of Awat’ovi are about an hour and a half east of where I live, but I hadn’t heard of this story until recently. Awat’ovi was the first village the Spanish encountered when they first came to the area, and it also was where the primary center of mission work to the Hopi was established, Mission San Bernardo de Aguatubi. During the Pueblo Revolt, the mission was destroyed, but once the Spanish re-established control, missionaries returned to Awat’ovi and found a receptive audience, according to both Spanish and Hopi versions of the event.

In an entirely successful move to eliminate further inroads by the missionaries, the town was burned and its residents killed, with a few survivors taken to the other villages. At the time of its destruction, Awat’ovi was the largest Hopi village, with something like 800 residents. The total Hopi population at the time was estimated at something like 2200 people, so the Hopi killed about 1 in 3 of their own in order to preserve themselves from outside influence.

This harsh measure arguably worked, and as the other stories in this volume attest, this kind of a solution is something that was imaginable when the people fell away from traditional practices. However, much like similar acts committed by Catholics, such as the Albigensian Crusade, the feeling now seems to be “let’s not do that again'“. Within the last hundred years, the split between Hopi who wanted a more traditional way of life and those who were open to Western ways was resolved by the founding of new villages, Hotevilla and Kykotsmovi, where people with different ways of life could live apart from one another.

I highly recommend this volume, it is a fascinating piece of local history, and a valuable insight into Hopi culture. ( )
  bespen | Dec 28, 2020 |
Malotki relates legends of seven Hopi cities violently destroyed (Hisatsongoopavi, Qa'ötaqtipu, Pivanhonkyapi, Sikyatki, Huk'ovi, Hovi'itstuyqa, and Awtat'ovi). Before each legend, author provides some background, including whatever has been discovered through archaeology, and compares various versions of the same legend (e.g. stories by Fewkes, Courlander, Colton, Voth, etc). Witchcraft or sorcery play a part in some of the legends, and Malotki's discussion on the Hopi view of witchcraft and sorcery is interesting. The destruction of Awat'ovi in about 1700, while it was occupied by Spanish missionaries, is perhaps one of the best known legends. Strangely, the legend contains minimal reference to the Spanish presence, but instead focuses on the behavior of the Hopis living in that village. Yet it would appear that the social chaos that led to the destruction, was a result, intentionally or not, of interaction with the Spanish missionaries.

All the stories are about a violent end to a Hopi town, so this is rather reading. It is still worth reading, if you find Hopi mythology to be interesting. ( )
  dougb56586 | Sep 22, 2019 |
Es mostren totes 2
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

Cap

Hopi Tales of Destruction preserves seven powerful tales about ancient Hopi villages thatnbsp;now lie in ruins. These narratives shed considerable light on the Hopis' past, giving insight into cultural values and social motivations beyond the ability of archaeology. The tales concern such villages as Sikyatki, Hisatsongoopavi, and Awat'ovi, which were destroyed by war, fire, earthquake, or internal strife. Though abandoned for centuries, they live in memory, reminders of ancient tragedies and enmities that changed the Hopis forever. Related by storytellers from Second and Third Mesa, these tales vividly describe village destruction and show how much human evils such as witchcraft, hubris, corruption, and betrayal of fundamental values can precipitate social disintegration and chaos. Ekkehart Malotki, who collected the original tales in the Hopi vernacular, has carefully edited and translated the tales in this special English-language edition. His introduction, notes, and a glossary reveal what historical and archaeological research has pieced together about the villages and correlates the stories with other legends.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.5)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 1
4.5
5 1

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 169,947,154 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible