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Space 2069: After Apollo: Back to the Moon,…
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Space 2069: After Apollo: Back to the Moon, to Mars … and Beyond (2020 original; edició 2020)

de David Whitehouse (Autor)

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2413744,582 (3.67)6
Membre:Chris177
Títol:Space 2069: After Apollo: Back to the Moon, to Mars … and Beyond
Autors:David Whitehouse (Autor)
Informació:Icon Books (2020), Edition: Illustrated, 304 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:****
Etiquetes:own, space flight, astronomy, engineering, science

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Space 2069: After Apollo: Back to the Moon, to Mars, and Beyond de David Whitehouse (2020)

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Es mostren 1-5 de 13 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Ressenya escrita per a Crítics Matiners de LibraryThing .
David Whitehouse has written a concise work, laying out where humanity currently is with respect to space exploration and where we could conservable find ourselves by the year 2069 (one hundred years since our first landing on the moon.) His narrative skillfully weaves the perfect proportions of wonder, history, poetry, and the difficult problems and challenges that we must address. His book is honest and is complete with the strategies, of how humanity might best approach this journey of exploration and on what is possible to achieve in the future. I enjoyed is book and highly recommend it to not only space enthusiasts, but to anybody looking for an update of the current state of space exploration and what the future of that exploration could hold. ( )
  stevetempo | Feb 1, 2021 |
Ressenya escrita per a Crítics Matiners de LibraryThing .
This book looks back at the history of space exploration before moving on to the current state of our space program and the speculation on what the future may hold. I found the book interesting and would recommend it. ( )
  cweller | Jan 28, 2021 |
Ressenya escrita per a Crítics Matiners de LibraryThing .
Space the place where everybody wants to go. Whether it be to the moon or Mars, it’s the biggest thing there is. This book is both a look back at the history of space travel and a look at the possible future, and it does it with aplomb. ( )
  mrmapcase | Jan 25, 2021 |
Following a speculative chapter of what human involvement in space exploration might be like at the centenary marking mankind’s first steps on the lunar surface, the author looks at the promises and the pitfalls of the space program after the glory days of Apollo. Lack of support and the tragic loss of two space shuttles seemed to ring a death-knell for the American space program.

And yet, the Artemis Project aims to land on the moon by 2024. The establishment of a lunar base would be the next logical step in man’s progression beyond the home planet. There's a strong focus on where we've been and what we've learned, a vital component of planning for future missions. Knowing what worked, what didn't, and what we've discovered creates a solid foundation for building those new missions.

A review of the findings from several lunar probe missions provides information on the moon, helping pave the way for that base, a base that will be destined to be a firm reality by 2069.

Beyond the moon, Mars beckons. Humans settled on the red planet, also a firm reality by 2069.

But there are several nations involved in space exploration; several corporations and several men have stepped into the arena, including Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos. What might these other nations, these corporations, these men mean to the programs ultimately developed for the human exploration of space? What have we learned from the probes and surveyors we’ve sent to Mars? How have the rovers changed what we understand about the red planet? Life on the moon or on Mars would be far different from life on Earth . . . no trees, no grass, just a bleak, red Martian or grey lunar landscape.

What physiological and psychological effects will need addressing before undertaking missions that will send astronauts into space for extended lengths of time or will have humans establishing settlements on the moon or Mars? Will we mine asteroids or visit the moons of the other planets of our solar system?

Beyond Mars lie Jupiter and Saturn, the gas giants, and Uranus and Neptune, the ice giants. Will they call to explorers? What have we learned from space probes and surveyors?

What of Mercury and Venus or of celestial visitors like comets? How will they fit into the plan of space exploration? By 2069, what decisions will affect man’s steps into the solar system . . . and beyond? Will there be humans who have never lived on man’s home planet?

Take a solar system tour and speculate on the future of man in space.

A section of color pictures is included.

Highly recommended. ( )
  jfe16 | Dec 25, 2020 |
Ressenya escrita per a Crítics Matiners de LibraryThing .
David Whitehouse's part history, part speculation on the subject of human exploration of our solar system is both a nice introduction to what's been done since Apollo and what we might do in the next fifty years. Most books on the future of space travel tend to be naive about what can be done, and how quickly, and underestimate the difficulty and cost of the exploration they propose. Space 2069 is typical in that regard. It's inspiring and uplifting on the one hand, but with a sense of unrealistic imaginings on the other.

Along with most other authors on this subject, Whitehouse never tackles two hard questions: why should we explore outer space and why should we send people to do it? The first has been asked since Apollo days - given how much space exploration costs, are there better uses for the money to solve problems here on earth? Given my more than 30 years building spacecraft, I believe the scientific return has been worth it, but I get why people ask. The second question of why *human* exploration is an even harder one - given the success of robotic exploration, why take the risk and the extra cost of protecting the astronauts as they go? Again, I think this an inevitable an worthwhile risk, but it's a difficult sell, as one can see with the end of the Apollo missions and transition to Shuttle/ISS low Earth orbit operations. You'll get inspiration from Whitehouse, but no real discussion of these questions. ( )
  drneutron | Dec 15, 2020 |
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In 2012 the Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgarner jumped from the stratosphere, launching himself from a capsule suspended from a helium balloon.
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