IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind (1976)

de Julian Jaynes

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2,027416,760 (4.15)43
At the heart of this revised edition is the idea that human consciousness did not begin far back in animal evolution, but is a learned process brought into being as recently as 3000 years ago out of an earlier hallucinatory mentality. The implications of this theory extend into all aspects of man's psychology, history, culture, religion and even future. Included in this edition is an introduction in which the author answers critics of his theory and presents his new ideas.… (més)
  1. 00
    Woke Racism: How a New Religion Has Betrayed Black America de John McWhorter (themulhern)
    themulhern: John McWhorter identifies a new religion; Julian Jaynes explains why it exists.
  2. 00
    The Big U de Neal Stephenson (themulhern)
    themulhern: "The Big U" has a note about "The Origin" at the front and a plot influenced by the ideas.
  3. 00
    The King Must Die de Mary Renault (themulhern)
    themulhern: Jaynes would argue that Theseus was a pre-conscious here; Renault, on the other hand, makes him very self-aware. However, the god does speak to Theseus, to tell him of impending earthquakes.
  4. 00
    Termination Shock de Neal Stephenson (themulhern)
    themulhern: Well, "Origins" is a work of literature almost more than science and Stephenson has never stopped being influenced by it, from "The Big U" to his most recent work.
  5. 00
    Gods, Voices, and the Bicameral Mind: The Theories of Julian Jaynes de Marcel Kuijsten (Usuari anònim)
    Usuari anònim: Expands on Julian Jaynes's theory.
  6. 00
    The Julian Jaynes Collection de Marcel Kuijsten (Usuari anònim)
    Usuari anònim: Additional articles, interviews, and discussion with Julian Jaynes.
  7. 00
    Reflections on the Dawn of Consciousness: Julian Jaynes's Bicameral Mind Theory Revisited de Marcel Kuijsten (Usuari anònim)
    Usuari anònim: Expands on Julian Jaynes's theory.
  8. 00
    Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages de Guy Deutscher (chmod007)
    chmod007: The first few chapters of Through The Language Glass talk about color as a cultural construct, drawing upon 19th century inquiries into the works of Homer and his seeming indifference to the finer hues of the spectrum. The beginning of TOOCITBOTBM starts with a similar exploration of ancient conceptions (or lack thereof) of consciousness, supported by linguistic evidence.… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 43 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 41 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Novelty of idea and style make this a winner. ( )
  themulhern | Aug 14, 2022 |
If valid, Jaynes’ theory has far-reaching ramifications. ( )
  AlexanderPatico | Jul 20, 2021 |
Here's an idea: what if consciousness - self-awareness, the 'I' and that private inner 'space' it seems to inhabit - is no emergent phenomenon, result of millions of years of brain evolution, but a purely cultural one derived from language, via metaphor, and which didn't appear sometime back in the Pleistocene, but recently (very recently, around 1200 BC in Julian Jaynes' estimation)?
   As ideas go, it's a corker. By that date we were already tilling fields and founding the first cities, the Pyramids had been built and the Iliad written - all by non-conscious human beings according to Jaynes. He was no crank though: graduate of Yale and lecturer at Princeton, the nature of consciousness was the lifelong focus of his work as an ethologist. His theory was presented at a meeting of the American Psychological Society in Washington DC (admittedly to a mostly nonplussed audience) and The Origin of..., published in 1976, was runner-up in the USA's National Book Awards' nonfiction category a couple of years later. His theory rests on the brain's division into two hemispheres: earlier than around 1200 BC, instead of the introspective thinking familiar to us today, the right hemisphere solved problems non-consciously, passing on its instructions to the left where they were experienced as hallucinations (particularly auditory hallucinations) which the people themselves interpreted as the voices of gods. The gods, in other words, seemed entirely real to them and directed their lives; the resulting societies were authoritarian, rigidly stratified and stable, almost like those of social insects (think Ancient Egypt). In the Near East though, around Jaynes' critical date, this 'bicameral' mentality broke down due to demographic (and other) stresses, and was gradually replaced by the self-aware modern mind; the resulting societies, this time, were composed of true individuals.
   This book is in three parts: the first outlines the theory, the second examines the evidence and the third considers possible vestiges of the bicameral mind still around today; and if all this sounds like Velikovsky or von Daniken, well it isn't exactly. In Jaynes' case the most common reaction, from academics in particular, has been a sort of head-scratching bafflement. I think this is at least partly because The Origin is beautifully written - even its trickiest ideas are explained simply, clearly, and in prose which a lot of good fiction writers would envy. What criticism there has been has focused mostly on the extraordinary timescale involved, and on Jaynes' interpretation of the Iliad - and anyone interested in Mesopotamian archaeology, or who knows the Iliad well (or the Old Testament, or the Epic of Gilgamesh) will soon see why.
   I can't help wondering, too, how much of the scepticism is a gut-reaction to Jaynes' choice of the term 'hallucinations' (a word which comes with a lot of baggage: drug use, mental disorder) and the idea of Achilles and Abraham resembling schizophrenics. There's also the presence of the Julian Jaynes Society which issues newsletters and books defending and promoting the theory, but which has precisely the opposite effect (on me at least): it makes the whole thing look a bit cultish, like Scientology. My own scepticism comes from a different direction altogether though: another implication of this theory is that, if true, it would mean that only human beings are conscious - something I don't believe for a minute. Apes, elephants, cetaceans, corvids and perhaps others all show every sign of self-awareness.
   Overall, I'm left with the feeling that this isn't all nonsense, that there's truth lurking at the heart of Jaynes' theory; I thought the first chapter, where he outlines what consciousness is not, what it doesn't do, by far the best - I agreed with every word of that. It's just that, from that starting point, he immediately veered off in a direction very different from the one I would have gone in. It's still, though, as thought-provoking a read as I've come across for some time. ( )
1 vota justlurking | Jul 4, 2021 |
I've read this once or twice over the years. The theory strikes me as either genius- like really really genius, think Newton and Einstein or Dirac, or utterly compelling hogwash. Not sure we will know until we can compute us up a person! ( )
  frfeni | Jan 31, 2021 |
Questo breve libro ci introduce al pensiero di Julian Jaynes, lo psicologo americano ideatore di una teoria sulla coscienza molto affascinante, ma anche molto controversa.
La coscienza, cioè il soggetto della nostra mente che rende possibile l'introspezione, secondo l'autore non sarebbe un elemento connaturato alla nostra struttura cerebrale, ma una capacità che gli esseri umani hanno acquisito su impulso delle condizioni storiche.
Jaynes afferma che le nostre capacità mentali, anche quelle avanzate, non necessitano della coscienza per avere luogo. Alla sua comparsa, l'Homo Sapiens probabilmente non aveva alcuna capacità di introspezione, con l'andare del tempo e con il sorgere delle prime società complesse, però, gli umani hanno sviluppato quella che l'autore chiama "Mente Bicamerale". Durante l'era della mente bicamerale gli uomini interpretavano l'attività cosciente della propria mente come degli elementi esterni. Deriverebbero da questa caratteristicale voci degli dei che gli uomini affermavano di sentire durante questo periodo. La mente moderna, quella dotata di autocoscienza, per l'autore, si svilupperebbe molto più tardi. Intorno al 1000 A.C quando appaiono le prime testimonianze scritte dei processi di introspezione.
La teoria di Jaynes è estremamente originale, altrettanto affascinante ma questo libretto non basta per soddisfare ogni domanda che riesce a suscitare.
Sicuramente è un buon punto di partenza per esplorare il pensiero di uno studioso affascinante ( )
  JoeProtagoras | Jan 28, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 41 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
O, what a world of unseen visions and heard silences, this insubstantial country of the mind!
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Men have been conscious of the problem of consciousness almost since consciousness began.
And the feeling of a great uninterrupted stream of rich inner experiences, now slowly gliding through dreamy moods, now tumbling in excited torrents down gorges of precipitous insight, or surging evenly through our nobler days, is what it is on this page, a metaphor for how subjective consciousness seems to subjective consciousness.
For if we ever achieve a language that has the power of expressing everything, then metaphor will no longer be possible. I would not say, in that case, my love is like a red, red rose, for love would have exploded into terms for its thousands of nuances, and applying the correct term would leave the rose metaphorically dead.
We have been brought to the conclusion that consciousness is not what we generally think it is. It is not to be confused with reactivity. It is not involved in hosts of perceptual phenomena. It is not involved in the performance of skills and often hinders their execution. It need not be involved in speaking, writing, listening, or reading. It does not copy down experience, as most people think. Consciousness is not at all involved in signal learning, and need not be involved in the learning of skills or solutions, which can go on without any consciousness whatever. It is not necessary for making judgements or in simple thinking. It is not the seat of reason, and indeed some of the most difficult instances of creative reasoning go on without any attending consciousness. And it has no location except for an imaginary one! The immediate question therefore is, does consciousness exist at all? But that is the problem of the next chapter. Here it is only necessary to conclude that consciousness does not make all that much difference to a lot of our activities.
These scientisms, as I shall call them, are clusters of scientific ideas which come together and almost surprise themselves into creeds of belief, scientific mythologies which fill the very felt void left by the divorce of science and religion in our time. They differ from classical science and its common debates in the way they evoke the same response as did the religions which they seek to supplant. And they share with religions many of their most obvious characteristics: a rational splendor that explains everything, a charismatic leader or succession of leaders who are highly visible and beyond criticism, a series of canonical texts which are somehow outside the usual arena of scientific criticism, certain gestures of idea and rituals of interpretation, and a requirement of total commitment. In return the adherent receives what the religions had once given him more universally: a world view, a hierarchy of importances, and an auguring place where he may find out what to do and think, in short, a total explanation of man. And this totality is obtained not by actually explaining everything, but by an encasement of its activity, a severe and absolute restriction of attention, such that everything that is not explained is not in view.
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic
At the heart of this revised edition is the idea that human consciousness did not begin far back in animal evolution, but is a learned process brought into being as recently as 3000 years ago out of an earlier hallucinatory mentality. The implications of this theory extend into all aspects of man's psychology, history, culture, religion and even future. Included in this edition is an introduction in which the author answers critics of his theory and presents his new ideas.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.15)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5 1
2 9
2.5 2
3 38
3.5 9
4 95
4.5 17
5 112

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 176,608,597 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible