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The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown…
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The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind (1976 original; edició 2000)

de Julian Jaynes

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1,888376,576 (4.15)42
At the heart of this revised edition is the idea that human consciousness did not begin far back in animal evolution, but is a learned process brought into being as recently as 3000 years ago out of an earlier hallucinatory mentality. The implications of this theory extend into all aspects of man's psychology, history, culture, religion and even future. Included in this edition is an introduction in which the author answers critics of his theory and presents his new ideas.… (més)
Membre:dah_sab
Títol:The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind
Autors:Julian Jaynes
Informació:Mariner Books (2000), Paperback
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Julian Jaynes

Detalls de l'obra

The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind de Julian Jaynes (1976)

  1. 00
    Gods, Voices, and the Bicameral Mind: The Theories of Julian Jaynes de Marcel Kuijsten (Usuari anònim)
    Usuari anònim: Expands on Julian Jaynes's theory.
  2. 00
    Reflections on the Dawn of Consciousness: Julian Jaynes's Bicameral Mind Theory Revisited de Marcel Kuijsten (Usuari anònim)
    Usuari anònim: Expands on Julian Jaynes's theory.
  3. 00
    The Julian Jaynes Collection de Marcel Kuijsten (Usuari anònim)
    Usuari anònim: Additional articles, interviews, and discussion with Julian Jaynes.
  4. 00
    Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages de Guy Deutscher (chmod007)
    chmod007: The first few chapters of Through The Language Glass talk about color as a cultural construct, drawing upon 19th century inquiries into the works of Homer and his seeming indifference to the finer hues of the spectrum. The beginning of TOOCITBOTBM starts with a similar exploration of ancient conceptions (or lack thereof) of consciousness, supported by linguistic evidence.… (més)
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Es mostren 1-5 de 37 (següent | mostra-les totes)
I've read this once or twice over the years. The theory strikes me as either genius- like really really genius, think Newton and Einstein or Dirac, or utterly compelling hogwash. Not sure we will know until we can compute us up a person! ( )
  frfeni | Jan 31, 2021 |
Questo breve libro ci introduce al pensiero di Julian Jaynes, lo psicologo americano ideatore di una teoria sulla coscienza molto affascinante, ma anche molto controversa.
La coscienza, cioè il soggetto della nostra mente che rende possibile l'introspezione, secondo l'autore non sarebbe un elemento connaturato alla nostra struttura cerebrale, ma una capacità che gli esseri umani hanno acquisito su impulso delle condizioni storiche.
Jaynes afferma che le nostre capacità mentali, anche quelle avanzate, non necessitano della coscienza per avere luogo. Alla sua comparsa, l'Homo Sapiens probabilmente non aveva alcuna capacità di introspezione, con l'andare del tempo e con il sorgere delle prime società complesse, però, gli umani hanno sviluppato quella che l'autore chiama "Mente Bicamerale". Durante l'era della mente bicamerale gli uomini interpretavano l'attività cosciente della propria mente come degli elementi esterni. Deriverebbero da questa caratteristicale voci degli dei che gli uomini affermavano di sentire durante questo periodo. La mente moderna, quella dotata di autocoscienza, per l'autore, si svilupperebbe molto più tardi. Intorno al 1000 A.C quando appaiono le prime testimonianze scritte dei processi di introspezione.
La teoria di Jaynes è estremamente originale, altrettanto affascinante ma questo libretto non basta per soddisfare ogni domanda che riesce a suscitare.
Sicuramente è un buon punto di partenza per esplorare il pensiero di uno studioso affascinante ( )
  JoeProtagoras | Jan 28, 2021 |
I have not read something that has changed my mind and the view of the world as much as this in years. I understand this hypothesis is probably impossible to prove one way or another but it has amazing explanatory power. It makes all of history fall into place for me. I find the chapters dealing with modern brain dysfunctions and hypnosis as a window to the bicameral mode less convincing but still thought-provoking. Despite the profundity of the subject it's written in an extremely approachable manner and requires no specialist knowledge. I'd recommend it to everyone, there's not that many books that offer a completely new view of the (history of the) world. ( )
1 vota Paul_S | Dec 23, 2020 |
This book is very stimulating.

That is not to say it is correct or incorrect as a theory of consciousness, but there are enough examples and provocative ideas to make me *think* it might be right. And that's the whole problem. I can't immediately discount it. It keeps creeping back into my consciousness.

Even when reading it with deep suspicions, the very meme of this core idea breaks down the wall between my right and left hemispheres and I no longer have an external agent telling me what I must do. No voices, no riding in my body like I'm not an agent of my own destiny, and not even the god of the right side of my brain giving me instructions!

I jest, kinda. For this is the key to the book. It postulates that humanity was more like a zombie agent in the philosophical parlance than any true consciousness before the advent of writing. That language, itself, was a meme that forced us to develop, and re-develop our cognitions until we became our own agents, doing things by our own decisions.

Before, we were all highly perceptive creatures that always acted without reflection. We went through our lives, followed orders, did what needed to be done, but never thought of ourselves as actors. No "I". Language, as a meme, destroyed that boundary. Brought creativity into motive, the idea of self into all equations.

It explains why a mass of humanity could accomplish the pyramids on either side of the ocean, probably without complaint. There was no self. Death masks and spirits of the dead, gods, oracles, etc., could be heard by anyone and it all came from the "outside". Separate from us, but undeniable, like an edict from high. The theory is that these commands came from the right hemisphere. The creative center of the brain.

It fits. And so much of this book is devoted to the Homeric epics, to poetry, to possession, art, and music. When it became commonplace, the reliance on "gods" diminished. Rapidly. We internalized it, and it was thanks to language.

So seductive.

And it sparks my imagination, too. I think about how many people today want to submerge their consciousnesses again, be it by faith in God, alcohol, drugs, or any number of addictions (including internet!). It feels like a biological callback to the times when we did not have guilt or worry. We just followed outside orders from kings and gods, not caring if we lived or died because there was no "self" at all to care. It's a freedom in the most literal sense of the word. Freedom from self. I think of Buddhism. Or being welcomed in the arms of God in heaven. Of raptures and release.

This is what language freed us from. This is also the story of the Tree of Knowledge. Which happens to come from right after the time we developed this facility, according to Jaynes.

Interesting, no? Why have we come so far, so fast? Our humanity is much older than this timeframe, and yet it is not this chaotic, developed, or fractured. We selected ourselves, either genetically or socially, to increase the likelihood of a greater mix of both the left and right hemispheres of our brains. And here we are.

Very interesting. ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
A fascinating thesis that shines through some tedious pages of necessary evidence to support the central idea. ( )
  le.vert.galant | Nov 19, 2019 |
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O, what a world of unseen visions and heard silences, this insubstantial country of the mind!
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Men have been conscious of the problem of consciousness almost since consciousness began.
And the feeling of a great uninterrupted stream of rich inner experiences, now slowly gliding through dreamy moods, now tumbling in excited torrents down gorges of precipitous insight, or surging evenly through our nobler days, is what it is on this page, a metaphor for how subjective consciousness seems to subjective consciousness.
For if we ever achieve a language that has the power of expressing everything, then metaphor will no longer be possible. I would not say, in that case, my love is like a red, red rose, for love would have exploded into terms for its thousands of nuances, and applying the correct term would leave the rose metaphorically dead.
We have been brought to the conclusion that consciousness is not what we generally think it is. It is not to be confused with reactivity. It is not involved in hosts of perceptual phenomena. It is not involved in the performance of skills and often hinders their execution. It need not be involved in speaking, writing, listening, or reading. It does not copy down experience, as most people think. Consciousness is not at all involved in signal learning, and need not be involved in the learning of skills or solutions, which can go on without any consciousness whatever. It is not necessary for making judgements or in simple thinking. It is not the seat of reason, and indeed some of the most difficult instances of creative reasoning go on without any attending consciousness. And it has no location except for an imaginary one! The immediate question therefore is, does consciousness exist at all? But that is the problem of the next chapter. Here it is only necessary to conclude that consciousness does not make all that much difference to a lot of our activities.
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At the heart of this revised edition is the idea that human consciousness did not begin far back in animal evolution, but is a learned process brought into being as recently as 3000 years ago out of an earlier hallucinatory mentality. The implications of this theory extend into all aspects of man's psychology, history, culture, religion and even future. Included in this edition is an introduction in which the author answers critics of his theory and presents his new ideas.

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