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Far from the Light of Heaven de Tade…
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Far from the Light of Heaven (edició 2021)

de Tade Thompson (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
20213113,394 (3.51)30
"Simultaneously brutally grounded and wildly imaginative." --Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award winner A tense and thrilling vision of humanity's future in the chilling emptiness of space from rising giant in science fiction, Arthur C. Clarke Award winner Tade Thompson The colony ship Ragtime docks in the Lagos system, having traveled light-years to bring one thousand sleeping souls to a new home among the stars. But when first mate Michelle Campion rouses, she discovers some of the sleepers will never wake. Answering Campion's distress call, investigator Rasheed Fin is tasked with finding out who is responsible for these deaths. Soon a sinister mystery unfolds aboard the gigantic vessel, one that will have repercussions for the entire system--from the scheming politicians of Lagos station, to the colony planet Bloodroot, to other far-flung systems, and indeed to Earth itself. Praise for Far from the Light of Heaven "Gripping and skillfully told, with an economy and freshness of approach that is all Tade Thompson''s own. The setting is interstellar, but it feels as real, immediate, and lethal as today's headlines." --Alastair Reynolds "[I]nventive, exciting and compulsively readable...This book is like the Tardis, larger inside than out, with a range of ideas, characters, and fascinating future settings making it probably the best science fiction novel of the year." --The Guardian For more from Tade Thompson, check out: The Wormwood Trilogy Rosewater Rosewater: Insurrection Rosewater: Redemption… (més)
Membre:Echinopsis
Títol:Far from the Light of Heaven
Autors:Tade Thompson (Autor)
Informació:Orbit (2021), 384 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

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Far from the Light of Heaven de Tade Thompson

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Es mostren 1-5 de 13 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Thompson's most recent novel is a work I've been meaning to read all year, and I found it quite worthwhile. Billed as a locked-room mystery, this is more like a thriller in space, where Thompson has gone to some lengths to build in the actual experiences of real-life astronauts. The result is that this story feels like a cross between one of Andy Weir's problem-solving stories, and Neal Asher's tales based on body horror and ultra violence. Apart from that, Thompson has lost none of his flair for describing hard-boiled organizational politics, so if you enjoyed his "Wormwood" trilogy you should enjoy this book. My impression is that this is a free-standing novel, but I wouldn't mind seeing Thompson return to this milieu. ( )
  Shrike58 | Jul 27, 2022 |
Hooked up from the beginning. Fast reading, liked the idea. Didn't like not knowing what IFC stands for. Didn't like the Aliens. ( )
  gustavoberman | Jun 29, 2022 |
This is an enjoyable locked-room mystery, except the locked room is an interstellar spaceship. Thompson throws a lot in here--AIs and wormholes and such--but I think it works, mainly because of the light, buddy-cop-movie tone. I particularly liked the cultures of the colony planet Bloodroot and the space station Lagos as well as the presumably alien Lambers. There are engaging characters, a fair amount of grisliness and lots of action. ( )
  sturlington | Apr 24, 2022 |
There's a lot to love about this work, and the concept and characters sucked me in immediately. Some of Thompson's scenes and images are also so viscerally compelling, it's impossible to look away, and journeying through the story was a fascinating experience that bridged genres and sped me through a world I fell in love with learning about. I will say that the pacing felt rushed toward the end, partly because it suddenly felt like a bunch of POVs were fighting for attention, and some of what I'd loved about the book got left behind in the chaos. I do think this story and the characters could easily have been two books, and been better for the extra time/content involved. I also found that I wished Thompson would focus on different details of world-building than the ones I would have loved to hear about--BUT, when I read his Afterword post-story, that shed a lot of light and context on his choices, and added to the reading experience in general.

Much as I have small quibbles with the book, including the cover feeling a bit like false advertising, the read was a fun one, and I'm looking forward to trying more of Thompon's work sometime in the future. ( )
  whitewavedarling | Apr 21, 2022 |
Well done locked room mysteries are always fun to read. So when this novel protagonist wakes up on a spaceship that is supposed to have 1001 sleeping people on board (1000 passengers and her as the first mate) and the computer tells her that she has only 969 passengers, there is obviously something wrong - the ship doors were never opened so the 31 missing people need to be somewhere. Then their status gets upgraded to murdered - she finds them - in the waste disposal are, cut in parts. Noone is supposed to be awake so... what happened?

That's how the novel opens - and it gets crazier from there. But let's roll back for a minute and meet the characters.

Michelle 'Shell' Campion is on her first interstellar trip as the first mate on the Ragtime. She has a history with deep space - her father, a legendary astronaut, got lost there on his last trip. The ship has an AI that does all the work - she is there just in case - so she sleeps the 10 years between Earth and Bloodroot (a colony reached after jumping through a line of Dyson gates). Being told more than once in the first chapter that the AI never breaks makes one expect it to break... or there won't be a story after all. So here she is - first trip, 31 missing passengers, a crazy AI who seems to have broken (but that was impossible, right?) and on top of everything she sees a wolf in the corridors.

Meanwhile down on Bloodroot, they decide to send an investigator, Rasheed Fin, with his trusty Artificial companion Salvo, to investigate the deaths. The problem is that Fin is the black sheep of his department, on suspension for the last year after an accident (which is why they send him) and he really does not do well with people. Neither does Shell. And with both of them with different objectives (he is looking for a murdered, she is trying to shoulder the responsibility for the passengers so she is staying upbeat and positive and what's not), they make a very unlikely team.

The novel reads almost campy, almost like a satire of a science fiction novel in places and yet it fits somehow. It ends up working - it takes awhile to stop rolling your eyes at the single-mindedness of Fin and Shell - but it all has a point.

And the there is the station that holds the gate - Lagos. There is a governor but he is sidelined and the real power rests with the Secretary - whose only objective is not to lose money (and to stay in power). Everyone is scared of her (except the governor) and she really hates problems. A ship that passed through her space and ended up in such a mess before it is officially out of her space? That's a problem. So she decides to solve it - not my figuring out how anyone died (she does not care) but by making sure Lagos will get paid for the transit - in any way possible. Meanwhile the governor has his own plan because he happens to be Shell's godfather...

Add to all that another rogue AI, a very wealthy man who seems to have pissed off everyone in the world, an experimental unit on the ship which is never supposed to be opened until the ship gets back to Earth and an alien form that is different from what you expect (or anyone thinks) and the novel packs a lot in a relatively short text. But it does not feel overwritten or too crowded. Thomson even manages to squeeze in a love story (which feels like it is written by a 10 years old - but the see my note about the novel sounding almost campy in places).

As usual, who the murderer is turns out to be the least interesting part of the story. The why of the murders is a lot more interesting. The aftermath of it ends up being most of the story (and a lot of it is gory and weird enough to make me wonder if that should not be classified as horror and not science fiction... or a cross between them anyway). And somewhere in all that story, the author managed to show that humans will be humans even when we go across the stars - both in our greatest hours and our lowest. Especially at our lowest. And he leaves a door for a sequel - the story finished but humanity, which apparently expanded without wars in space (how did we manage that?), seems to finally have brought weapons to space... and Bloodroot got some pretty interesting new inhabitants.

I liked the writing. I really liked the ability of the author to take elements that do not fit together, throw them together, make fun of them and somehow end up with a serious action. That novel should not have worked - both Fin and Shell should not have worked as characters (not to mention some of the supporting cast), not the way they are written. The whole novel should have collapsed. And yet, somehow it did not. I suspect that not everyone will like this style but it seems to be working for me so I am off checking what else this author had written. ( )
1 vota AnnieMod | Feb 3, 2022 |
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"Simultaneously brutally grounded and wildly imaginative." --Adrian Tchaikovsky, Arthur C. Clarke Award winner A tense and thrilling vision of humanity's future in the chilling emptiness of space from rising giant in science fiction, Arthur C. Clarke Award winner Tade Thompson The colony ship Ragtime docks in the Lagos system, having traveled light-years to bring one thousand sleeping souls to a new home among the stars. But when first mate Michelle Campion rouses, she discovers some of the sleepers will never wake. Answering Campion's distress call, investigator Rasheed Fin is tasked with finding out who is responsible for these deaths. Soon a sinister mystery unfolds aboard the gigantic vessel, one that will have repercussions for the entire system--from the scheming politicians of Lagos station, to the colony planet Bloodroot, to other far-flung systems, and indeed to Earth itself. Praise for Far from the Light of Heaven "Gripping and skillfully told, with an economy and freshness of approach that is all Tade Thompson''s own. The setting is interstellar, but it feels as real, immediate, and lethal as today's headlines." --Alastair Reynolds "[I]nventive, exciting and compulsively readable...This book is like the Tardis, larger inside than out, with a range of ideas, characters, and fascinating future settings making it probably the best science fiction novel of the year." --The Guardian For more from Tade Thompson, check out: The Wormwood Trilogy Rosewater Rosewater: Insurrection Rosewater: Redemption

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