IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

One Hundred Saturdays: Stella Levi and the Search for a Lost World (2022)

de Michael Frank

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
16014168,529 (4.31)14
Biography & Autobiography. History. Judaica. Nonfiction. HTML:One of Wall Street Journal's Ten Best Books of the Year * Winner of the National Jewish Book Awards for Holocaust Memoir and Sephardic Culture * Recipient of the Jewish Book Council's Natan Notable Book Award * Winner of the Sophie Brody Medal

The remarkable story of ninety-nine-year-old Stella Levi whose conversations with the author over the course of six years bring to life the vibrant world of Jewish Rhodes, the deportation to Auschwitz that extinguished ninety percent of her community, and the resilience and wisdom of the woman who lived to tell the tale.
With nearly a century of life behind her, Stella Levi had never before spoken in detail about her past. Then she met Michael Frank. He came to her Greenwich Village apartment one Saturday afternoon to ask her a question about the Juderia, the neighborhood on the Greek island of Rhodes where she'd grown up in a Jewish community that had thrived there for half a millennium.

Neither of them could know this was the first of one hundred Saturdays over the course of six years that they would spend in each other's company. During these meetings Stella traveled back in time to conjure what it felt like to come of age on this luminous, legendary island in the eastern Aegean, which the Italians conquered in 1912, began governing as an official colonial possession in 1923, and continued to administer even after the Germans seized control in September 1943. The following July, the Germans rounded up all 1,700-plus residents of the Juderia and sent them first by boat and then by train to Auschwitz on what was the longest journey??measured by both time and distance??of any of the deportations. Ninety percent of them were murdered upon arrival.

Probing and courageous, candid and sly, Stella is a magical modern-day Scheherazade whose stories reveal what it was like to grow up in an extraordinary place in an extraordinary time??and to construct a life after that place has vanished. One Hundred Saturdays is a portrait of one of the last survivors drawn at nearly the last possible moment, as well as an account of a tender and transformative friendship between storyteller and listener, offering a powerful "reminder that the ability to listen thoughtfully is a rare and significant gift" (The Wall Street Journ
… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 14 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 14 (següent | mostra-les totes)

Happy Publication Day! (September 6, 2022)

At the age of fourteen, Stella Levi, the youngest of seven children born to Miriam and Yehuda Levi, leaves a packed suitcase near the door of her family home in the Juderia, the Jewish Quarter on the Island of Rhodes. The suitcase was symbolic of her aspirations - to finish school and attend university in Italy, to travel and learn and see the world beyond her sheltered life. But life had other plans for her. Seven years later, on July 23, 1944, she is one of the 1,650 Jewish population of Rhodes who are rounded up by the Germans and sent to Auschwitz, along with her parents and immediate elder sister Renee. It was one of the longest journeys (in terms of both time and distance) of any deportation during the Holocaust. Ninety percent of her fellow Rhodeslis would not survive the concentration camps.

In 2015, author Michael Frank meets ninety-two-year-old Stella in Greenwich Village. Over a hundred Saturdays spanning six years, Stella shares her story with Mike who views Stella as “a Scheherazade, a witness, a conjurer, a time traveler” who shares her journey with him.

Stella extensively details her early life in Rhodes including the history of the Sephardic Jews- their language, customs and traditions and the way of life in the Juderia. She also talks about the changing political landscape of the region and how it impacted the lives of residents of the island- both inside and outside the Juderia. More than half of the book is devoted to Stella’s life before deportation – her family, her dreams and how life changed for her and her family with the promulgation of racial laws in 1938 and the persecution of Jews that followed. Though her family followed the news of the war on the radio (which was prohibited), they had never known about the concentration camps until they were sent to Auschwitz. Initially, she is reluctant to talk much about her experiences in the concentration camps as she does not those experiences to define her story. However, having established a level of trust with the author , she eventually gives him a glimpse into the horrific period she spent in the camps , having been shuttled from Auschwitz- Birkenau to Dachau and the satellite camps before the camps were liberated by the Allied Forces. Stella goes on to share how she rebuilt her life in the aftermath of WWII- dealing with the loss of those who perished in the camp, the difficult choices she had to make, her journey from Italy to the United States with the memories of the home she left behind and the uncertainty that lay ahead. As we follow Stella's life through the years we see how she refuses to be defined by her tragic past but chooses to live life as she sees fit- constantly reinventing herself as the situation demanded.

“Very early on, almost from the beginning, something curious happened. I detached myself from the Stella who was in Auschwitz. It was as if everything that was happening to her was happening to a different Stella, not the Stella I was, not the Stella from Rhodes, the Stella I knew. I watched this person, this other Stella, as she walked through this desert, but I was not this person.” After a moment she adds, “There was no other way.”

Michael Frank's “One Hundred Saturdays” is a well-written, moving and insightful biography. The narrative is structured in the order of the conversations he has with Stella Levi. Stella's story gives us a glimpse into the history of the former Jewish Quarter of Rhodes, Greece. Her decision to share her story largely stems from her desire to preserve the history of her community. I had no knowledge of the history of the Jewish community of Rhodes before reading this book. The descriptions of the culture and customs were both interesting and informative. Maira Kalman's beautiful full-color illustrations depicting scenes from Stella's life are a lovely addition to the narrative. Stella's story , though heartbreaking, is ultimately one of courage, survival and resilience, and commands both respect and admiration. Overall, this beautifully penned biography is an absorbing read that I would definitely recommend.

Many thanks to Avid Reader Press, Michael Frank and NetGalley for the digital review copy. All opinions expressed in this review are my own. ( )
  srms.reads | Sep 4, 2023 |
Amazing book. Stella Levi is amazing. Another excellent memoir as an interview. Who knew about the Jews in Rhodes. ( )
  shazjhb | May 12, 2023 |
I knew absolutely nothing about the Juderia in Rhodes and found this book very enlightening. Bravo to Stella for telling her story on her own terms and her grit, as well as to Michael Frank for making sure her account was not lost to the world. In addition, the illustrations really enhance the book by conveying aspects of this remarkable lost community and the vibrant culture that was eradicated by genocide. The information regarding Italy's mostly-overlooked participation in Nazi Germany's deportation of this ancient Jewish settlement during the last gasps of World War II is especially important and makes this book a particularly valuable (and disturbing) read. ( )
  dele2451 | Apr 9, 2023 |
Michael Frank interviews Stella who is 98 years old. She was from Rhodes. tells life in Rhodes, transportation to concentration camps, Auschwitz, getting to America. Life in America. ( )
  evatkaplan | Mar 21, 2023 |
How rare and how significant to have an unknown universe revealed in a book. Stella Levi was a teen in the Juderia, the small ghetto in Rhodes, Greece, home to Jewish transplants from Spain for centuries, in the halcyon days before WWII. The youngest child in a large family, she both relished and resented the tight confines of the sunny island, and kept a bag packed so that she could flee to Italy and a classical education when she was old enough to leave. In 1923, the island was taken over by Italy, which brought outside culture and expanded the tight boundaries of the Juderia and of Stella’s own life. In July of 1944, the Nazis put all the 1,650 Juderia residents on boats and trains to Auschwitz. The motivation of the Nazis, to take out such a small insignificant group of Jews from the tiny island, so close to the end of the war they were losing, is still unknown. Stella, her elder sister Renee, and a few other surviving Rhodeslis were transferred to remote forest work camps and were liberated by the Americans a year later. Stella survived, but never thrived, never truly felt at home anywhere, not in the US and not in Rhodes, where she eventually returns. Her dissatisfaction with herself, her feelings not of survivor's guilt, but shame that she had never locked on a plan or an ambition, never was able to study or to find a career she relished, is startling when you consider what it took for her to live through her time under the Nazis. Later in life, she becomes involved with the Centro Primo Levi in NYC and is able to find purpose. Writer Michael Frank meets Stella in 2015, as he is interested in her life in the Juderia, and they comes to enjoy their Sundays spent together, as Stella's story unwinds. You sense how cathartic it is for Stella to share the horror and her personal dissatisfaction with a new friend, and the two become close and Frank becomes responsible for opening up Stella's Juderia to the world. Artist Maira Kalman's illustrations are also illuminative, if not too few in number. Holocaust books, fiction and non, have become a genre of their own, but this exceptional biography uses it as a backdrop for an interrupted life. ( )
  froxgirl | Feb 4, 2023 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 14 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Epígraf
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
“The tremendous world I have inside my head . . .”

                             —-KAFKA
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
for

STELLA

of course

and in memory of my grandmothers,

SYLVIA SHAPIRO RAVETCH

and

HARRIET FRANK SR.,

storytellers all
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
The sea isn’t wine-dark so much as a blue so bottomless and transparent that it hurts to look into it, the way it can hurt to look into another person’s eyes.
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
“There’s an old adage,” I tell her. “I wonder if you’ve heard it. The youngest child is the one who gets to tell the story—the one who gets to have the last word. I think it was Henry James who said something like that.”

“Having the last word,” she says, can be very lonely.”
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

Cap

Biography & Autobiography. History. Judaica. Nonfiction. HTML:One of Wall Street Journal's Ten Best Books of the Year * Winner of the National Jewish Book Awards for Holocaust Memoir and Sephardic Culture * Recipient of the Jewish Book Council's Natan Notable Book Award * Winner of the Sophie Brody Medal

The remarkable story of ninety-nine-year-old Stella Levi whose conversations with the author over the course of six years bring to life the vibrant world of Jewish Rhodes, the deportation to Auschwitz that extinguished ninety percent of her community, and the resilience and wisdom of the woman who lived to tell the tale.
With nearly a century of life behind her, Stella Levi had never before spoken in detail about her past. Then she met Michael Frank. He came to her Greenwich Village apartment one Saturday afternoon to ask her a question about the Juderia, the neighborhood on the Greek island of Rhodes where she'd grown up in a Jewish community that had thrived there for half a millennium.

Neither of them could know this was the first of one hundred Saturdays over the course of six years that they would spend in each other's company. During these meetings Stella traveled back in time to conjure what it felt like to come of age on this luminous, legendary island in the eastern Aegean, which the Italians conquered in 1912, began governing as an official colonial possession in 1923, and continued to administer even after the Germans seized control in September 1943. The following July, the Germans rounded up all 1,700-plus residents of the Juderia and sent them first by boat and then by train to Auschwitz on what was the longest journey??measured by both time and distance??of any of the deportations. Ninety percent of them were murdered upon arrival.

Probing and courageous, candid and sly, Stella is a magical modern-day Scheherazade whose stories reveal what it was like to grow up in an extraordinary place in an extraordinary time??and to construct a life after that place has vanished. One Hundred Saturdays is a portrait of one of the last survivors drawn at nearly the last possible moment, as well as an account of a tender and transformative friendship between storyteller and listener, offering a powerful "reminder that the ability to listen thoughtfully is a rare and significant gift" (The Wall Street Journ

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Debats actuals

Cap

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.31)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 15
4.5 6
5 9

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 202,006,939 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible