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One Hundred Saturdays: Stella Levi and the…
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One Hundred Saturdays: Stella Levi and the Search for a Lost World (2022 original; edició 2022)

de Michael Frank (Autor)

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628375,514 (4.4)2
The remarkable story of ninety-nine-year-old Stella Levi whose conversations with the writer Michael Frank over the course of six years bring to life the vibrant world of Jewish Rhodes, the deportation to Auschwitz that extinguished ninety percent of her community, and the resilience and wisdom of the woman who lived to tell the tale. With nearly a century of life behind her, Stella Levi had never before spoken in detail about her past. Then she met Michael Frank. He came to her Greenwich Village apartment one Saturday afternoon to ask her a question about the Juderia, the neighborhood in Rhodes where she'd grown up in a Jewish community that had thrived there for half a millennium. Neither of them could know this was the first of one hundred Saturdays that they would spend in each other's company as Stella traveled back in time to conjure what it felt like to come of age on this luminous, legendary island in the eastern Aegean, which the Italians began governing as an official possession in 1923 and transformed over the next two decades until the Germans seized control and deported the entire Juderia to Auschwitz. Probing and courageous, candid and sly, Stella is a magical modern-day Scheherazade whose stories reveal what it was like to grow up in an extraordinary place in an extraordinary time--and to construct a life after that place has vanished. One Hundred Saturdays is a portrait of one of the last survivors drawn at nearly the last possible moment, as well as an account of a tender and transformative friendship that develops between storyteller and listener as they explore the fundamental mystery of what it means to collect, share, and interpret the deepest truths of a life deeply lived.… (més)
Membre:FayIrwin
Títol:One Hundred Saturdays: Stella Levi and the Search for a Lost World
Autors:Michael Frank (Autor)
Informació:Avid Reader Press / Simon & Schuster (2022), 240 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

One Hundred Saturdays: Stella Levi and the Search for a Lost World de Michael Frank (2022)

History (113)
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Es mostren 1-5 de 8 (següent | mostra-les totes)
I read a hardcover edition and enjoyed reading a “real” book. I’ve been reading a lot of e-editions. I bring only paper books with me when I’m out and about and I like being able to always have a book with me.

This is a good addition to Holocaust literature. I particularly appreciated Stella’s description of how and why women often fared better than men throughout the ordeal.

My favorite parts though were learning about life on Rhodes before the deportation.

There were parts of the story that took place in NYC that I also found fascinating.

The part of the story that is about the camps was relatively brief but for me offered some details new to me, even though I’ve read many Holocaust books.

I applaud the inclusion of all sorts of memories during the various times and settings and how all sorts of emotions were felt, humor included.

Stella annoyed me when she was cryptic and in interviews instead of answering would say that is for another day, something that occurred a lot but I guess it’s the author I’m irked with because he could have just written what she did actually tell him vs. including what she said she wouldn’t tell him or wouldn’t tell him yet.

Stella has had an interesting life and in many ways was a remarkable girl and is a remarkable woman but I think I might have enjoyed this book more if its focus had not been on only/mostly Stella. If it had been written about the Jews of Rhodes and what had happened to all of them perhaps I’d have found the narrative more compelling. That said, hearing this story from one person’s point of view had its advantages.

“I do believe that as we travel through life we become a different person in every situation, or context, or phase.”

A useful selected bibliography is included in the back of the book.

3-1/2 stars ( )
  Lisa2013 | Nov 6, 2022 |
I know that technically I'm reviewing the book and not Stella's experiences, but it's hard for me to separate the two. I feel as if I'm rating her life. Doesn't quite feel right. There is no way I can read anything on the Holocaust and not wonder how people can be so inhumane. Almost an entire country looked away and let it happen. Maybe a warning we here in the states need to take to heart

Reading about Stella and her family, the Jewish population in Rhodes, the closeness, their lives, was so interesting. Makes what happens afterwards even more heartbreaking, if that's even possible. She didn't want to talk about her life in the camps, but at nearly 100, and due to the authors continuing interest, she eventually does so. She was in many camps, many of which I had never heard. I found a commonality, besides the horrors evidenced, between Stella's experience and those of Frankel and Primo Levy's experiences in camps. At wars end when the Americans were making their way liberating camps, a very I'll Frankel and Levy, lives were saved because they were in the camps infirmary. Stella's was saved because though ill, she was sent away from the infirmary. The next day, all those in the infirmary were killed. Fate or luck if one can even use that word. ( )
  Beamis12 | Sep 25, 2022 |
The remarkable story of ninety-nine-year-old Stella Levi, whose conversations with the writer Michael Frank over the course of six years bring to life the vibrant world of Jewish Rhodes, the deportation to Auschwitz that extinguished ninety percent of her community, and the resilience and wisdom of the woman who lived to tell the tale.
  HandelmanLibraryTINR | Sep 14, 2022 |
Stella Levi is a Holocaust survivor from the island ofRhodes. She is interviewed 100 Saturdays while in her late 90’s telling her story ( )
  MomMom46 | Sep 13, 2022 |
One Hundred Saturdays, In Search of a Lost World, Michael Frank
This book had a profound effect on me, although I have read hundreds of other books about this barbaric period of history. I had neither known about the history of Rhodes, nor was I aware of the Juderia, a community of Jews that lived there, Jews that wound up there as they historically fled persecution from other countries of the world, persecution that was and is unfathomable, but was apparently, unstoppable. They lived there in relative peace; Muslims heard their call to prayer; Jews, went to Synagogue. The children that qualified, attended schools run by the Church. It was a place where they enjoyed following their customs and traditions and maintained their culture.
After a series of interviews between Michael Frank and Stella Levi, that took place over a period of more than six years, beginning in 2015, this book was born,. Michael Frank has unearthed and written about the previously little known life of Stella Levi, and with it, the history of Juderia, her home on the island of Rhodes, an island that had survived under the rule of leaders from several countries, and like Rhodes, Stella’s life was also multifaceted, a result of her upbringing, her tragic experiences during World War II, and her future life as she went from country to country in order to find a home, a home that would accept her, and one in which she would find comfort. Whether that marriage of desires was completely fulfilled will be left to the reader to determine. Stella, may not be certain, even at the age of 99, if America was the correct choice. Of what she is certain, however, is that love, in its many forms is the thing that sustained her and still does.
I have not read another approach like this one, that exposes the way in which an entire community reacted to the barbarism of the Nazis. The story is touching and heartbreaking because they were so naïve. At first, when Mussolini allied with Hitler, the effect on their community was minimal, although Stella’s father’s business was taken from him, as a result. Gradually, after Germany took over, the racial laws became more oppressive, and still, no one rebelled. They merely accepted what was happening because they believed it would soon be over. When schools were closed, a secret school run by professors and clergy, appeared for some. Others did not want to participate. It seemed that the oppression was so subtle, at first, so gradual as to go unnoticed, and was disbelieved, questioned, until it was far too late to resist.
The Jews had enjoyed their lives, their culture, their customs, and their traditions, and they continued to enjoy their lives in their small enclave of Juderia, worshiping their G-d, attending services, singing and dancing in their courtyards, and generally continuing to communicate with and to help each other in times of need. Their Synagogue, family, and friends were the center of their universe. Some children rebelled and wanted more, but many simply continued to live as they had throughout history. We Jews, both Ashkenazi and Sephardic, still observe many of the same customs. We serve eggs after funerals, put out bowls of water at the door, rent clothes as we mourn, refrain from sitting on furniture in mourning, view all Jews as a part of our community. It is a birthright, period.
When the status quo came to an end, they were unprepared and still very much naïve, believing they were being gathered together to be sent to another place to live temporarily. No one there could have imagined the fate that awaited them. Some were saved from the Nazi’s ultimate end game by serendipity, some by nationality, some by sheer luck and courage. Most, were not saved. Many were murdered. Survivors did not wish to return to Rhodes, the place where it all began for them. However, it began for the rest of the world, elsewhere, and the book will inspire deep thought into our current way of life and force us to study the question, could it happen again?
As this remarkable book described the life of a young woman from the early 1900s until the present day, as I witnessed what she had to live through, the choices she had to make, and was amazed by her courage, independence and wisdom, as they shone bright throughout the telling of her story, I wondered why the conversation about the Holocaust often makes it about a choice between those who believed in Communism and those who believed in Fascism? Both are undesirable extremes at either end of the spectrum of evil. Surely there must be a middle choice we can all agree upon.
As communication was curtailed by their government, as opposition and speech was silenced, as the news from only one point of view was presented, and as people who disagreed were disrespected, diminished and mocked, increasingly unable to defend themselves, the world descended into madness. Is it really impossible to believe another Holocaust is impossible, as we witness events in our current world today. Are we as resilient, are we as supportive of each other, is there even a common culture to support to help us survive? We have all been scarred by our history, but how we deal with our scars will determine whether or not the world will succumb to tyranny or peace.
As the Jews were removed from society, bit by bit, so the Republicans are now being removed, silenced and forbidden to participate in life, by the very same people who think that they are the virtuous ones. Is history repeating itself today with politics rather than religion? As there was little resistance from the Jews, during the Holocaust, so difficult was the end result to imagine, we see little resistance from the Republicans as they naively believe this will end with cooler minds in charge. It is not happening, however, as the Democrats continue to perpetuate hate and division with deceitful behavior which is denied by a complicit “state” media.
Although in Rhodes and elsewhere, many were proud to join underground organizations to fight the tyranny of the leadership, today they are shamed and maligned for fighting back against this heinous cancel culture, not different from the racial laws of Hitler. How different are the policies of the brown and black shirts from the policies of the “green” shirts of today? As are schools and our employment choices are being closed to certain people, under the pretense of inclusion, but are really the opposite, exclusionary, how do they really differ from the Nuremberg Laws enacted in 1935? When property is taken from one to give to another, how different is it from forgiving student debt? Will the masses continue to remain impassive because of personal benefit?
I implore everyone to look in the mirror and hope that the person looking back is not guilty of the same shameful behavior of the National Socialists as they slowly but surely attempted to (and almost succeeded), wipe out an entire nationality because no one could believe it could actually happen. If the same naivete exists today, as one political party attempts to do that to another, are we doomed to repeat history?
I loved this book. I loved it for its history, its humanity, its courage, and its honesty, but I loved it more for the warning it sent to me. If half the country is silenced by the other half, can our country survive? As the Jews were removed from society, bit by bit, so the democrats are trying to do that to the Republicans. Although this was not the intent of the author, this is an important message I gleaned from the book. As love, in its various forms, sustained Stella, how can we restore mutual love and respect in America, before it is too late? We must not let history repeat itself. ( )
  thewanderingjew | Aug 30, 2022 |
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“The tremendous world I have inside my head . . .”

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for

STELLA

of course

and in memory of my grandmothers,

SYLVIA SHAPIRO RAVETCH

and

HARRIET FRANK SR.,

storytellers all
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The remarkable story of ninety-nine-year-old Stella Levi whose conversations with the writer Michael Frank over the course of six years bring to life the vibrant world of Jewish Rhodes, the deportation to Auschwitz that extinguished ninety percent of her community, and the resilience and wisdom of the woman who lived to tell the tale. With nearly a century of life behind her, Stella Levi had never before spoken in detail about her past. Then she met Michael Frank. He came to her Greenwich Village apartment one Saturday afternoon to ask her a question about the Juderia, the neighborhood in Rhodes where she'd grown up in a Jewish community that had thrived there for half a millennium. Neither of them could know this was the first of one hundred Saturdays that they would spend in each other's company as Stella traveled back in time to conjure what it felt like to come of age on this luminous, legendary island in the eastern Aegean, which the Italians began governing as an official possession in 1923 and transformed over the next two decades until the Germans seized control and deported the entire Juderia to Auschwitz. Probing and courageous, candid and sly, Stella is a magical modern-day Scheherazade whose stories reveal what it was like to grow up in an extraordinary place in an extraordinary time--and to construct a life after that place has vanished. One Hundred Saturdays is a portrait of one of the last survivors drawn at nearly the last possible moment, as well as an account of a tender and transformative friendship that develops between storyteller and listener as they explore the fundamental mystery of what it means to collect, share, and interpret the deepest truths of a life deeply lived.

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