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The Lady of the Lake (The Witcher, 7) de…
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The Lady of the Lake (The Witcher, 7) (1999 original; edició 2017)

de Andrzej Sapkowski (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,1862613,387 (3.95)6
"The Witcher returns in this action-packed sequel to The Tower of Swallows, in the New York Times bestselling series that inspired The Witcher video games. After walking through the portal in the Tower of Swallows while narrowly escaping death, Ciri finds herself in a completely different world... an Elven world. She is trapped with no way out. Time does not seem to exist and there are no obvious borders or portals to cross back into her home world. But this is Ciri, the child of prophecy, and she will not be defeated. She knows she must escape to finally rejoin the Witcher, Geralt, and his companions - and also to try to conquer her worst nightmare. Leo Bonhart, the man who chased, wounded and tortured Ciri, is still on her trail. And the world is still at war"--… (més)
Membre:Tixii
Títol:The Lady of the Lake (The Witcher, 7)
Autors:Andrzej Sapkowski (Autor)
Informació:Orbit (2017), Edition: Reprint, 560 pages
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Informació de l'obra

Lady of the Lake de Andrzej Sapkowski (1999)

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» Mira també 6 mencions

Anglès (21)  Alemany (3)  Polonès (1)  Italià (1)  Totes les llengües (26)
Es mostren 1-5 de 26 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Since I'm so late to this I'll keep it short. The narrative is extremely fractured which ultimately is disappointing. Side stories and minor characters are given chapter after chapter. In sum the three main characters—The Witcher, Yennifer, and Ciri—have less page time than ever. There are brilliant chapters, some of the best of the entire series. There are chapters that are much less brilliant and at times enough to be frustrating. I would recommend that the book be finished if you've come this far but be aware that the journey and narrative are more like stream of consciousness than linear. Loose ends are tied up but it very much feels like the various plotlines ended up being far too many and the book is not quite under control. But the good chapters are very, very good and a reason to see it to the end. ( )
  byl_strother | Mar 6, 2022 |
The timeline on this book is very strange. It opens with Ciri bathing in a strange lake. She is spotted by a knight who mistakes her for Nimue, the Lady of the Lake. That knight turns out to be Sir Galahad. Ciri has found herself, through the strange machinations of the plot, in a parallel universe. She sits down to tell this odd knight her whole tale.

After Ciri escaped her pursuers, by fleeing into the Tower of the Swallow, she is taken captive by the elves. Although they despise her for possessing a mere fraction of the Elder Blood, they still need her to make a child with their king to fulfill prophecy and server a number of political ends. Reluctantly, Ciri agrees as it appears to be the only means of her returning to her friends. However, the elven king cannot bring himself to complete the act of love with her, and she soon learns that no matter what happens, the elves will never release her.

It is then that she meets with the unicorn she healed all those years ago. She bargains with him and together they begin jumping from world to world and time to time, seeking Ciri's home and destiny.

Meanwhile, Geralt and his team of unlikely allies set out to save Yennifer from her captors and find Ciri. The two groups meet in the tower where Vilgefortz has been torturing Yennifer. Ciri is immediately captured as Vilgefortz intends to breed her as well for his own ends. Together, Ciri, Yennifer, & Geralt fight their way out only to be captured by the emporer of Nilfgaard who turns out to be Ciri's father. He also intends to make a baby with Ciri and convinces Geralt and Yennifer to commit suicide to escape a disgraceful execution.

However, at the last minute, the emperor leaves with very little explanation and the group travels the land exacting revenge on all the people who hurt Ciri. Later, they are separated again when the sorcerers summon Ciri and Yennifer. Surprising no one, they have their own political plans for Ciri, but she convinces them to let her go and see Geralt one last time. Unfortunately, before can be reunited, Geralt is slain in a pogrom.

Ciri boards a mysterious boat with her unicorn and winds up sitting by a lake with Galahad. They ride off together, as Ciri figures she can find work and possibly even love here.

This book is wild. The last book was so amazing, and this one seemed to lose a lot of steam. There is so much political scheming in this book and so many different factions with so many different characters that I truly lost track of by the end. The scene in Vilgefortz's tower is so amazing that it makes up for almost all the books shortcomings. Unfortunately, the book goes on for a further few hours. The ending is sad and dreamy and unreal. I just wanted them all to get their happy ending, but ALAS. It's not that type of story, I guess. I feel like I need to take a college level class to understand all the politics, prophecy and intrigue happening in these books. It's very complex. ( )
  Juva | Jan 28, 2022 |
This review is also featured on Behind the Pages: Lady of the Lake

Ciri has traveled to an elven world. One that appears to be a place of tranquility, but hides a terrible history. Time does not exist in this world and Ciri must escape. For the elves want something from Ciri, something she is not willing to give them. And with each denial, their darker sides begin to show. Meanwhile, Geralt has never stopped searching for Ciri. Even if it kills him he will pursue the girl and try to bring her to safety. Destiny has much in store for the characters of the Witcher.

Ciri’s character development had me worried at the start of this novel. The tough take no-nonsense witcher girl began to backslide. She never seemed to use her experience and skills to think of ways to escape. As the story progressed, I started to see the Ciri I knew she was, and yet many of her choices confused me. The number of times she tried to give her body away instead of fighting or attempting infiltration was shocking. It also left me feeling a bit disgusted that this theme of giving yourself away was used. I did have to stop reading this book about halfway through and branch off to other novels because I was so frustrated. If this weren’t the last in the series I would have most likely DNFed this book.

I will say though that Andrzej Sapkowski is thorough when creating villains. As each adversary appeared, both old and new, their wickedness was written into every part of their character. From their ideologies to their despicable thoughts and actions, it was clear how malicious their intent was. And not every villain was the sword-wielding, action prone type. Some hid in the shadows and manipulated behind the scenes, or used their misguided wants and needs to redirect the protagonists. However, I wish more time had been spent with the protagonists versus the antagonists.

When the protagonists were on the page their parts were fast-paced and engaging. However, the majority of this tale returns to politics and backdoor deals. There was also an emphasis on building up minor characters readers met in previous books and giving them a completed character arc. But when it came time to end the character arcs of the protagonists, and even some of the secondary characters close to the main storyline, their endings were cut short and some even glossed over. After such an epic journey throughout this series, I expected more out of the last book.

Does Lady of the Lake tie up the Witcher series? Yes, it does bring everything to an end, whether well developed or not, and it gives readers information that has never before been revealed. Certain pieces click into place and you’ll find yourself thinking back over the previous books and rethinking certain scenes or characters. I just wish our heroes had been given more page time and certain areas of the writing style allowed for a more detailed plot for everyone. ( )
  Letora | Dec 3, 2021 |
Wikipedia says that Umberto Eco is one of Sapkowski's favourite writers. I can definitely see that. Not only did I see a direct hommage to the Name of the Rose; I think that all Witcher's books function in a very similar way to Eco's: each book is a labyrinth of references to other works of literature. Everything is a symbol that refers you to something else. The Witcher has references not only to slavic mythology and folklore, but also to Tolkien (you have the Eye, and the Black Riders) and medieval literature. I am not just talking about the title Lady of the Lake, or the direct and obvious references to the Arthurian world. The entire narrative is built like an Arthurian novel, in some ways I could almost feel like I was reading Thomas Mallory or Chrétien de Troyes. The Witcher's quest is definitely a quest for the Grail. These stories are so layered, and I know that I am not aware of all the richness inside them. I know that next time I read these books there will be new layers for me to uncover.
And of course there are the characters, their personal journey, the vision of humanity, friendship, parenthood, life and death. And of course the sense of humour! These books are not only deep, they are great fun to read. However you can chose to either stay in the surface or delve deeper on the mysteries they have to offer. ( )
  Clarissa_ | May 11, 2021 |
I mostly enjoyed the story itself but throughout the series, I wasn’t particularly fond of the writing style. Despite there being a follow-on book, this seems to be the last book in the story about Ciri. It wraps up the major story arc. With the author having so much more experience, I had some hope that this story would be better put together than the previous books. That hope was misplaced.

I really, really don’t like the Inception model this guy adopted. A story about a girl by the lake telling a guy a story, and within that story are stories about stories about stories. The narrative constantly jumps around in time. Plus, this need to put the story inside another story leads to the author spending inordinate amounts of time creating and developing characters that mean f*** all and do nothing but drag down the plot.

I also felt that there was a lot of name dropping of places and myths that was done not for the sake of progressing the story in a meaningful way or even to do any meaningful world building, but just to titillate the reading audience.

I had a few problems with how the author handled the characters:

This ultimate ability that Ciri winds up with seems implausible because the way it’s set up, she would have used it more frequently on accident before being truly aware of it. Plus, if it can’t be bound, how was it bound when she was trapped (being vague here to not spoil the story)? And when she was no longer trapped, why did she not continue to use it?

I’m also really bothered by the way the author handled Ciri and Bonhart’s storyline. The conclusion doesn’t seem plausible.

If sorcerers/sorceresses are so powerful that they were crucial to winning battles against Nilfgaard, then why were they portrayed as being pathetically weak in the last scene in Rivia?

How does Ciri’s presence in the location of the closing scene jive with what she told the Lodge about Geralt and Yennefer?

At the beginning of the book, the author has one of his throwaway characters say that legends should have happy endings and not be gritty and real. And that’s what we wind up with, more or less. A deus ex machina. But even the need for the deus ex machina is bizarre, because it only happens when the author forces all of the characters to not use their abilities or to use them poorly for no reason other than to create the situation.

I have the next book. I guess I’m going to read it because I’ve come this far, but this book was really disappointing in a lot of ways. ( )
  SGTCat | Feb 25, 2021 |
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Andrzej Sapkowskiautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Belletti, RaffaellaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
French, DavidTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Simon, ErikTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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William Shakespeare
« E cavalcarono finché non raggiunsero la riva di un lago dalle acque vaste e amene, e in mezzo al lago Artù vide un braccio rivestito di sciamito bianco: terminava in una mano che impugnava una bella spada. [...] E videro una fanciulla camminare sul lago. Chi è quella fanciulla?’ chiese Artù. È la Signora del Lago’, rispose Merlino. »

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"The Witcher returns in this action-packed sequel to The Tower of Swallows, in the New York Times bestselling series that inspired The Witcher video games. After walking through the portal in the Tower of Swallows while narrowly escaping death, Ciri finds herself in a completely different world... an Elven world. She is trapped with no way out. Time does not seem to exist and there are no obvious borders or portals to cross back into her home world. But this is Ciri, the child of prophecy, and she will not be defeated. She knows she must escape to finally rejoin the Witcher, Geralt, and his companions - and also to try to conquer her worst nightmare. Leo Bonhart, the man who chased, wounded and tortured Ciri, is still on her trail. And the world is still at war"--

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