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Smilla's Sense of Snow (1992)

de Peter Høeg

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
7,0181561,110 (3.75)486
The original Scandinavian thriller One snowy day in Copenhagen, six-year-old Isaiah falls to his death from a city rooftop.The police pronounce it an accident. But Isaiah's neighbour, Smilla, an expert in the ways of snow and ice, suspects murder. She embarks on a dangerous quest to find the truth, following a path of clues as clear to her as footsteps in the snow.… (més)
Afegit fa poc perJoeB1934, BarbKBooks, lkubed, rcabbott, alexandria2021, Cora-R, collapsedbuilding, biblioteca privada, ejmw
  1. 161
    Els homes que no estimaven les dones de Stieg Larsson (taz_)
    taz_: Charm school drop-outs Lisbeth Salander of "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" and Smilla Qaaviqaaq Jaspersen of "Smilla's Sense of Snow" strike me as unconventional soul sisters of the detective mystery. Each haunted by demons of the past, fiercely independent, armored in cynicism and misanthropy, they share a certain psychic landscape and brilliant, icy resourcefulness. If you love one, I predict you'll love the other.… (més)
  2. 51
    In the Woods de Tana French (nysmith)
  3. 40
    Arctic Chill de Arnaldur Indriðason (terran)
    terran: Winter atmosphere, immigrant alienation, slow-moving plot
  4. 31
    La Tendresa dels llops de Stef Penney (shelfoflisa)
    shelfoflisa: A mystery to be solved by a character on the edge of society, in an evocative setting.
  5. 10
    Butterflies in November de Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir (charl08)
    charl08: Female protagonist on a road trip in Nordic temperatures.
  6. 10
    Kolymsky Heights de Lionel Davidson (jayne_charles)
    jayne_charles: More intrigue at sub-zero temperatures
  7. 11
    Available Dark de Elizabeth Hand (libron)
  8. 00
    The Luminaries de Eleanor Catton (EMS_24)
    EMS_24: Story with a search, hidden information, minerals in a remote area.
  9. 00
    The Love of Stones de Tobias Hill (KayCliff)
  10. 00
    Operation Eismeer de Patrick Osborn (buchstabendompteurin)
  11. 11
    Norwegian by Night de Derek B. Miller (charl08)
    charl08: Thoughtful crime in Scandinavia
  12. 01
    Slaap! de Annelies Verbeke (_eskarina)
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» Mira també 486 mencions

Anglès (140)  Neerlandès (4)  Danès (3)  Alemany (2)  Italià (2)  Noruec (1)  Francès (1)  Portuguès (1)  Finès (1)  Castellà (1)  Totes les llengües (156)
Es mostren 1-5 de 156 (següent | mostra-les totes)
One of my all time favorite crime novels. I first read it in the 90’s but lost my copy, and was pleased to find a copy in England under a slightly different name. ( )
  BarbKBooks | Aug 15, 2022 |
Something about the death of a little boy who has fallen form a Copenhagen rooftop while playing, doesn't sit right with Smilla-- so she starts asking questions. One thing leads to another and the story escalates from being a mystery to being a thriller playing out against the background of the Arctic ice and sea...
Written in 1997, it definitely became the model for much of the Scandinavian Noir that followed, including the Millennium Trilogy: an odd female protagonist who probably registers on the autism spectrum who becomes fully engaged, nearly obsessed with resolution and, experiences rather high-octane events in that pursuit. The bulk of the novel is remarkable for the atmosphere, deft descriptions and pacing; but the last two sections seemed a bit less developed and the ending could have been better fleshed out. Still, a book to hang on to and re-read. ( )
  Tanya-dogearedcopy | May 22, 2022 |
Read this years ago, and am happy to read it again! Smart, thought-provoking thriller. Lots of layers, but does not seem overly contrived. ( )
  keithostertag | Mar 21, 2022 |
I read Peter Høeg's "Smilla's Sense of Snow" after being entranced by Julia Ormond as Smilla Jasperson in the movie. Smilla Jaspersen--half Greenlander, half Dane, an unconventional loner and brilliant scientist who struggles with her conflicted upbringing--is devastated when a young boy she has befriended mysteriously falls to his death from the roof of their apartment building. Unsatisfied that it was an accident, she follows a trail from Copenhagen to the bleak Arctic reaches to solve his murder. Since that time I've probably read it a half a dozen times--and not for the incantatory power of the prose. Don't get me wrong--the writing is terrific and the story is compelling, complex, and extraordinarily well-plotted--but what gripped me most about this book was the main character. And she still grips me today.

Smilla is undoubtedly the first contemporary fictional female character who isn't a wife, mother, saint, or a whore. Imagine a grown-up cross between Nancy Drew and Pippi Longstocking--if they'd been kicked out of every school they ever attended, hitchhiked around the world, maybe did some low-level smuggling, and somewhere along the way managed to pick up a couple of graduate degrees. Smilla is clever, bold, smart, independent, funny, adventurous, slightly reckless, and feels no qualms about telling the men who get in her way to shove off. She's a boat-rocker, whistle-blower, a rule-breaker who thumbs her nose at authority and refuses to submit, like a well-behaved girl, to the ancillary role society would like her to play (e.g., wife, mother, saint, whore). Which, of course, drive the men whose power she challenges into a fury that makes them want to annihilate her. The irony is that she was created by a man.

But Smilla's rebellion does not come without intense self-scrutiny and the painful knowledge that she's a lone wolf; at one despairing point in the book she even calls herself a loser. She admits her freakishness, the fact that she cannot find deep connections with others. She usually refrains from getting involved with men because she's terrified of becoming too dependent, of losing herself. She's terrified of being vulnerable, of being loved, of being left. And yet despite all of her fears she plods forward. She laments her inability to make a permanent place for herself in the world, and yet that doesn't deter her from what she feels is her duty--to solve the death of a little boy who may be the one person to whom she had what came close to a true connection. But the greater, unspoken challenge is how to live in the world as a black sheep, particularly if you are a woman.

Perhaps the intense dislike some feel towards Smilla stems from her daring to challenge the established structure of society which, despite all the advancements women have made, still places men on top and women underneath. Men dislike her because they can't abide a woman who doesn't know her second place; women dislike her because it forces them to address the power they give away by seeking validation from men. Plus, the world does not show any love for those who tell the truth or root out corruption--they are, more often than not, eliminated in one way or other. And yet, without those who exposed secrets or took the unpopular stand, who took the heat and bucked convention, we'd still be toiling in some medieval gloom.

I also loved how Høeg, in comparing Denmark to Greenland, underscores how the "progress" and "development" of the modern world have all but destroyed the integrity of ancient cultures, the beauty of the wilderness, and the deeply-ingrained rituals that lend meaning to life as well as binding people together. He weaves examples into the main plot as a kind of elegy to the world as it was before man's maniacal drive to improve it. Some improvements come to mind that did indeed improve the quality of life for mankind--fire, penicillin, and efficient farming methods--but there are so many more that can only make you weep. ( )
  Tayledras | Nov 16, 2021 |
I read Peter Høeg's "Smilla's Sense of Snow" after being entranced by Julia Ormond as Smilla Jasperson in the movie. Smilla Jaspersen--half Greenlander, half Dane, an unconventional loner and brilliant scientist who struggles with her conflicted upbringing--is devastated when a young boy she has befriended mysteriously falls to his death from the roof of their apartment building. Unsatisfied that it was an accident, she follows a trail from Copenhagen to the bleak Arctic reaches to solve his murder. Since that time I've probably read it a half a dozen times--and not for the incantatory power of the prose. Don't get me wrong--the writing is terrific and the story is compelling, complex, and extraordinarily well-plotted--but what gripped me most about this book was the main character. And she still grips me today.

Smilla is undoubtedly the first contemporary fictional female character who isn't a wife, mother, saint, or a whore. Imagine a grown-up cross between Nancy Drew and Pippi Longstocking--if they'd been kicked out of every school they ever attended, hitchhiked around the world, maybe did some low-level smuggling, and somewhere along the way managed to pick up a couple of graduate degrees. Smilla is clever, bold, smart, independent, funny, adventurous, slightly reckless, and feels no qualms about telling the men who get in her way to shove off. She's a boat-rocker, whistle-blower, a rule-breaker who thumbs her nose at authority and refuses to submit, like a well-behaved girl, to the ancillary role society would like her to play (e.g., wife, mother, saint, whore). Which, of course, drive the men whose power she challenges into a fury that makes them want to annihilate her. The irony is that she was created by a man.

But Smilla's rebellion does not come without intense self-scrutiny and the painful knowledge that she's a lone wolf; at one despairing point in the book she even calls herself a loser. She admits her freakishness, the fact that she cannot find deep connections with others. She usually refrains from getting involved with men because she's terrified of becoming too dependent, of losing herself. She's terrified of being vulnerable, of being loved, of being left. And yet despite all of her fears she plods forward. She laments her inability to make a permanent place for herself in the world, and yet that doesn't deter her from what she feels is her duty--to solve the death of a little boy who may be the one person to whom she had what came close to a true connection. But the greater, unspoken challenge is how to live in the world as a black sheep, particularly if you are a woman.

Perhaps the intense dislike some feel towards Smilla stems from her daring to challenge the established structure of society which, despite all the advancements women have made, still places men on top and women underneath. Men dislike her because they can't abide a woman who doesn't know her second place; women dislike her because it forces them to address the power they give away by seeking validation from men. Plus, the world does not show any love for those who tell the truth or root out corruption--they are, more often than not, eliminated in one way or other. And yet, without those who exposed secrets or took the unpopular stand, who took the heat and bucked convention, we'd still be toiling in some medieval gloom.

I also loved how Høeg, in comparing Denmark to Greenland, underscores how the "progress" and "development" of the modern world have all but destroyed the integrity of ancient cultures, the beauty of the wilderness, and the deeply-ingrained rituals that lend meaning to life as well as binding people together. He weaves examples into the main plot as a kind of elegy to the world as it was before man's maniacal drive to improve it. Some improvements come to mind that did indeed improve the quality of life for mankind--fire, penicillin, and efficient farming methods--but there are so many more that can only make you weep. ( )
  Tayledras | Nov 16, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 156 (següent | mostra-les totes)

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (4 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Høeg, Peterautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Alas, ArvoTÕlkija.autor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Berni, BrunoTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Bresnahan, AlyssaNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Cruys, GerardTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
David, FelicityTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Fricke, PeterSprecherautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Gnaedig, AlainTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Habdzová-Chmelová, TeodoraTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Habich, MatthiasSprecherautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hassiepen, Peter-AndreasDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Haughton, RichardFotògrafautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Helmersen, HelleEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Jansen, Ine F.Narradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Johansen, KnutOvers.autor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Kertész, JuditTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Novotný, RobertTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Nunnally, TinaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Pascual, Ana SofíaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Pidgeon, RebeccaReaderautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Posch, KristaSprecherautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Redmond, SiobhanReaderautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Rottem, ØisteinEpílegautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Rumac, MirkoTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Saluäär, AnuToimetaja.autor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Seeberg, Ann-MariTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Selvadjian, MartineTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Talvio-Jaatinen, PirkkoTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Vaicekauskienė, LoretaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Wesemann, MonikaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Краснова, ЕленаTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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Tr. Tiina Nunnally, US publication:

It's freezing - an extraordinary 0 Fahrenheit - and it's snowing, and in the language that is no longer mine, the snow is qanik - big, almost weightless crystals falling in clumps and covering the ground with a layer of pulverized white frost.
Tr. 'F. David' (Tiina Nunnally, plus changes by the publisher and author), UK publication:

It is freezing, an extraordinary -18°C, and it's snowing, and in the language which is no longer mine, the snow is qanik - big, almost weightless crystals falling in stacks and covering the ground with a layer of pulverized white frost.
Det fryser ekstraordinære 18 grader celcius, og det sner, og på det sprog som ikke mere er mit, er sneen qanik, store næsten vægtløse krystaller, der falder i stabler, og dækker jorden med et lag af pulveriseret, hvid frost.
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This winter I've been able to watch the ice forming
"Even if they ripped off your arms and legs, you'd find some way to kick back,"~ Verlaine to Smilla
The bad thing about death is not that it changes the future. It's that it leaves us alone with our memories.
The number system is like human life. First you have the natural numbers. The ones that are whole and positive. The numbers of the small child. But human consciousness expands. The child discovers longing. The mathematical expression for longing is the negative numbers. The formalization of the feeling that you are missing something. Human consciousness expands and grows even more, and the child discovers the in-between spaces. Between stones, between pieces of moss on the stones, between people. And between numbers. ... That leads to fractions. Whole numbers plus fractions produce the rational numbers. Human consciousness doesn't stop there. It wants to go beyond reason. It adds an operation as absurd as the extraction of roots. And produces irrational numbers. ... It's a form of madness. Because the irrational numbers are infinite. They can't be written down. They force human consciousness out beyond the limits. And by adding irrational numbers to rational numbers, you get real numbers. ... It never stops. ... We expand the real numbers with the imaginary ones, square roots of negative numbers. these are numbers that normal human consciousness cannot comprehend. And when we add the imaginary numbers to the real numbers, we have the complex number system.
The problem with being able to hate the colonization of Greenland with a pure hatred is that, no matter what you may detest about it, the colonization irrefutably improved the material needs of an existence that was one of the most difficult in the world.
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(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
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Original title: Frøken Smilla’s fornemmelse for sne
US Title: Smilla's Sense of Snow
UK title: Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow
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Wikipedia en anglès (1)

The original Scandinavian thriller One snowy day in Copenhagen, six-year-old Isaiah falls to his death from a city rooftop.The police pronounce it an accident. But Isaiah's neighbour, Smilla, an expert in the ways of snow and ice, suspects murder. She embarks on a dangerous quest to find the truth, following a path of clues as clear to her as footsteps in the snow.

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