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Great Tales from English History de Robert…
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Great Tales from English History (2003 original; edició 2007)

de Robert Lacey (Autor)

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6121731,892 (4.01)10
There was a time, as recently as nine thousand years ago, when the British Isles were not islands at all. After the bleakness of the successive ice ages, the south-eastern corner of modern England was still linked to Europe by a wide swathe of low-lying marshes. People crossed to and fro, and so did animals - including antelopes and brown bears. We know this because the remains of these creatures were discovered by modern archaeologists in a cave in the Cheddar Gorge near Bristol. Scattered among numerous wild horse bones, the scraps of bear and antelope had made up the larder of 'Cheddar Man', England's oldest complete skeleton, found lying nearby in the cave with his legs curled up under him. According to the radiocarbon dating of his bones, Cheddar Man lived and died around 7150 bc. He was a member of one of the small bands of hunter-gatherers who were then padding their way over the soft forest floors of north-western Europe. The dry cave was his home base, where mothers and grandmothers reared children, kindling fires for warmth and lighting and for cooking the family dinner. We don't know what language Cheddar Man spoke. But we can deduce that wild horsemeat was his staple food and that he hunted his prey across the grey-green Mendip Hills with traps, clubs and spears tipped with delicately sharpened leaf-shaped flints.… (més)
Membre:hanksfamilylibrary
Títol:Great Tales from English History
Autors:Robert Lacey (Autor)
Informació:Back Bay Books (2007), Edition: Illustrated, 544 pages
Col·leccions:Traci
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

Great Tales from English History, Volume I de Robert Lacey (2003)

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» Mira també 10 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 17 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Finished volume one. ( )
  MuggleBorn930 | Jul 11, 2021 |
A fun, entertaining journey through English history. Lacey uses a story driven narrative weaving together 43 short biographies (most around 4 to 5 pages in length) to tell the tale of how England came to be. Monarchs, and warriors, poets and priests, scientists and scribes: they all have their role to play, and their stories are engagingly told. ( )
  gothamajp | Jun 28, 2020 |
I read many of these tales when I was a child, so these are almost all reminders. It was enjoyable to be reminded. This book is modern, and so it draws parallels with the current events of its time which an earlier book would not have done. This is not illuminating, but is interesting, since the author is English, and English politics looms larger in his legend. ( )
  themulhern | Aug 5, 2018 |
Potted history, easy to digest, with worthwhile nuggets of information ( )
  DramMan | Jun 23, 2018 |
This was a very accessible volume. The book is divided into short stories, chronologically for the most part, about the characters that make history. Legend is treated firmly, but sympathetically, and everywhere that primary sources can be quoted they certainly are.

I found this book both entertaining and informative. The bibliography in the back was quite extensive, and I was rather happy to see that it included some of the books that I've been using for reference.

I'd recommend this to anyone with even an inkling of historical curiosity, as I do believe that it would be a good "gateway" book to get people in a scholarly mind. I've the next two books in the series as well, so here's looking to more history. ( )
  Lepophagus | Jun 14, 2018 |
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Wikipedia en anglès (3)

There was a time, as recently as nine thousand years ago, when the British Isles were not islands at all. After the bleakness of the successive ice ages, the south-eastern corner of modern England was still linked to Europe by a wide swathe of low-lying marshes. People crossed to and fro, and so did animals - including antelopes and brown bears. We know this because the remains of these creatures were discovered by modern archaeologists in a cave in the Cheddar Gorge near Bristol. Scattered among numerous wild horse bones, the scraps of bear and antelope had made up the larder of 'Cheddar Man', England's oldest complete skeleton, found lying nearby in the cave with his legs curled up under him. According to the radiocarbon dating of his bones, Cheddar Man lived and died around 7150 bc. He was a member of one of the small bands of hunter-gatherers who were then padding their way over the soft forest floors of north-western Europe. The dry cave was his home base, where mothers and grandmothers reared children, kindling fires for warmth and lighting and for cooking the family dinner. We don't know what language Cheddar Man spoke. But we can deduce that wild horsemeat was his staple food and that he hunted his prey across the grey-green Mendip Hills with traps, clubs and spears tipped with delicately sharpened leaf-shaped flints.

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Edicions: 031610910X, 0316067571

 

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