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The Windeby Puzzle: History and Story de…
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The Windeby Puzzle: History and Story (edició 2023)

de Lois Lowry (Autor)

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1106247,277 (3.78)13
Juvenile Fiction. Juvenile Literature. HTML:

Newbery Medalist and New York Times bestselling author Lois Lowry transports readers to an Iron Age world through the suspenseful dual narrative of a boy and girl both battling to survive. In an utterly one-of-a-kind blend of fiction and history, a master storyteller explores the mystery and life of the 2,000-year-old Windeby bog body.

Estrild is not like the other girls in her village; she wants to be a warrior. Varick, the orphan boy who helps her train in spite of his twisted back, also stands apart. In a world where differences are poorly tolerated, just how much danger are they in?

Inspired by the true discovery of the 2,000-year-old Windeby bog body in Northern Germany, Newbery Medalist and master storyteller Lois Lowry transports readers to an Iron age world as she breathes life back into the Windeby child, left in the bog to drown with a woolen blindfold over its eyes.

This suspenseful exploration of lives that might have been by a gifted, intellectually curious author is utterly one of a kind. Includes several arresting photos of archeological finds, including of the Windeby child.

.
… (més)
Membre:ubchm
Títol:The Windeby Puzzle: History and Story
Autors:Lois Lowry (Autor)
Informació:Clarion Books (2023), 224 pages
Col·leccions:Juvenile
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

The Windeby Puzzle de Lois Lowry

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Prestat 2024-03-03
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» Mira també 13 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 6 (següent | mostra-les totes)
This is a creative approach to middle grade historical fiction, sort of like [b:Woods Runner|6795756|Woods Runner|Gary Paulsen|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1320552751l/6795756._SY75_.jpg|7000800]. I thought it was interesting, but I prefer to get lost in a story, rather than have non-fiction essay sections that take me out of it. ( )
  LibrarianDest | Jan 3, 2024 |
In first person, the author explains the discovery of the Windeby child in northern Germany in 1952, then goes on to imagine the story of that child's abbreviated life: a 13-year-old girl called Estrild, an eldest daughter who wished to be a warrior and was punished for her audacity. But when scientists discovered that the bog body more likely belonged to a 16-year-old boy, the author imagined a different story: that of Varick, an orphan, a friend to Estrild, and a student of the natural world.

Lowry pulls back the curtain on an author's thought process, and how history is constructed and reconstructed, imagined and re-imagined. A curious, unique sort of book: part historical fiction, part mystery, part thought experiment.

Quotes

But Estrild's passion was someplace else. She thirsted for what the boys had: the strength. The power. (48)

That's exactly what history consists of: people, and their stories. What happened to them. What caused those things to happen. How they reacted to what happened. And how did they feel on that day, or the day before, or the day before that? (185) ( )
  JennyArch | Mar 4, 2023 |
In 1952, a body was found in a German peat bog -- an adolescent's body, about 2,000 year's old. Lowry takes the bare facts imparted by the remains and spins a story one way and then another, based on the region's history, the observations of archaeologists, and technological advances that have revealed more details since the discovery. The result is two well-written novellas bookended by brief but edifying historical notes. We know how the story will end, either way, but in spite of that, Lowry's tales are both touching and uplifting. Recommended for readers who enjoy stories set in ancient history. ( )
  foggidawn | Feb 21, 2023 |
As a writer of historical fiction, I was immediately intrigued by this book by an excellent writer whose other books I've admired. HF writers ponder endlessly the liberties and boundaries one might take and make with history as we turn it on our fiction lathes. So I was very interested in what Lowry was doing with this one. In the course of interweaving historical facts and her imagination, she confronts directly the problem of interpretation, of error, of gaps in information, and how our own values and feelings can color or distort them in the stories we create.

She begins with a summary of information about "bog people" - who they were, how they might have gotten there, what a bog is, etc. She outlines Iron Age people and what they might have been like, and describes the actual young person found in a north German bog whose story she proceeds to imagine: a pubescent girl, frustrated by the drudgery women and girls are subjected to in her village, and proceeds to disguise herself to be recognized as a warrior among the boys. There is a proto-feminism imposed on Estrild's story, which might be appealing to a modern reader (and which I frequently see in historical fiction), but which is fairly unlikely, and brings her [SPOILER] to a fatal punishment.

But wait! It turns outs that with modern technological analysis, the youngster from the bog was not a girl, but a rather frail boy. So Lowry re-imagines the story with that as a base, and gives us a hunchbacked orphan boy named Varick struggling to survive as a forger's servant. He too dies eventually, a natural death from illness and neglect. Varick's story fits better with the "facts" as we can know them - less dramatic, surely, but more convincing.

The writing is sometimes pedestrian and, especially with Estrild, can feel a bit too much like a lecture or a polemic. Some reviewers have been aghast at the idea of having kids read a book where the hero/ine dies (but then, these days, there are so many topics being deemed "unsuitable" for young readers that it's getting pretty depressing). But this is the Iron Age - people were lucky to make it to adulthood, and this forlorn young body in the bog didn't. I'm not sure how well this story will go over with its intended audience (I'm not a parent or a teacher or a youth librarian). But I will stand by its value as an interesting example of how a novelist struggles with history, how to tackle the death of the young, the authority of faith and religion over humans, and Lowry's honesty in working it through, before our eyes. I'd think this is a good one for parents to read with their kids - lots to talk about here! ( )
  JulieStielstra | Feb 16, 2023 |
Since Lois Lowry is one of my all-time favorite authors I had to read her newest book of course. I got through it all in one sitting as it was an extremely easy read and engaging. I don't think I've ever read anything like it. Lowry gives us a peak behind the curtain into how she researched the details for this book and wove history together with fiction quite seamlessly. The book transported me to the places the characters walked and I felt their feelings as Lowry is a vivid, masterful storyteller.

I really enjoyed both stories but I was left wanting something more with both tales which is why I only gave the book three and a half stars. I usually give three stars if I really enjoyed the book but it wasn't anything that stood out from other books I've read and then four stars if I REALLY enjoyed the book and it was one of the best I've ever read. Five stars is reserved for my favorites of all time.

SPOILER:

I so desperately wanted to know what possessed Estrild to believe that anyone would call her name if she lined up with the young wanna-be warriors. At best they would probably say, "What are you doing wearing men's clothing? You can't be a warrior you silly girl." The author built off of Tacitus’ cryptic statement that Iron Age people could be put to death for "disgracing their bodies." I'm amazed that being so young no one questioned her or interrogated or even gave her a proper trial. They simply immediately sentenced her to death! It didn't seem right. It seemed barbaric and inhuman of the people to strip her naked in front of everyone... men, women, and children included. People who were present did not come to witness this horrific treatment of a young girl. They should have stood up to the people in charge carrying this out. They shouldn't have watched this take place. I just found it so far-fetched that they wouldn't even ask her why she did it or if she regretted it. Their actions seemed so heartless, savage, and heathenish. I also found it odd that the boy would commit suicide at the end. Wouldn't he try to get better? Or am I misunderstanding exactly how he died? ( )
  sundancer | Feb 16, 2023 |
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Juvenile Fiction. Juvenile Literature. HTML:

Newbery Medalist and New York Times bestselling author Lois Lowry transports readers to an Iron Age world through the suspenseful dual narrative of a boy and girl both battling to survive. In an utterly one-of-a-kind blend of fiction and history, a master storyteller explores the mystery and life of the 2,000-year-old Windeby bog body.

Estrild is not like the other girls in her village; she wants to be a warrior. Varick, the orphan boy who helps her train in spite of his twisted back, also stands apart. In a world where differences are poorly tolerated, just how much danger are they in?

Inspired by the true discovery of the 2,000-year-old Windeby bog body in Northern Germany, Newbery Medalist and master storyteller Lois Lowry transports readers to an Iron age world as she breathes life back into the Windeby child, left in the bog to drown with a woolen blindfold over its eyes.

This suspenseful exploration of lives that might have been by a gifted, intellectually curious author is utterly one of a kind. Includes several arresting photos of archeological finds, including of the Windeby child.

.

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