IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

The Tyrannicide Brief: The Story of the Man Who Sent Charles I to the… (2005)

de Geoffrey Robertson

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
3161164,690 (4.15)17
"John Cooke was a plebeian, son of a poor Leicestershire farmer. His puritan conscience, political vision and love of civil liberty gave him the courage to bring the King's trail to its dramatic conclusion: the English republic. Cromwell appointed him as a reforming Chief Justice in Ireland, but in 1660 he was dragged back to the Old Bailey, tried and brutally executed." "Geoffrey Robertson, the internationally renowned human rights lawyer, provides a new reading of the tumultuous Civil War years, exposing long-hidden truths: that the King was guilty as charged; that his execution was necessary to establish the sovereignty of Parliament; that the regicide trials were rigged and their victims should be seen as national heroes." "John Cooke was the bravest of barristers, who risked his own life to make tyranny a crime. He originated the right to silence, the 'cab rank' rule of advocacy and the duty to act free-of-charge for the poor. He conducted the first trial of a Head of State for waging war on his own people - a forerunner of the prosecutions of Pinochet, Milosevic and Saddam Hussein, and a lasting inspiration to the modern world."--BOOK JACKET.… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 17 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 11 (següent | mostra-les totes)
A new take on an old story. Robertson holds up John Cooke, the prosecutor in the case against Charles I, as a liberal hero who was 350 years before his time. Robertson puts the best face possible on the Interregnum, but he succeeds in making a case that Cooke - not the Stuarts - are the ones to celebrate in a republican world. ( )
  poirotketchup | Mar 18, 2021 |
Geoffrey Robertson very ably recounts the trial of Charles I and the subsequent trials of the regicides, using as his centerpiece John Cooke, the lawyer assigned to prosecute the king (who later paid for his efforts with his own life). While Cooke certainly seems like a fascinating character, it seems like his actual role as a regicide was a bit overblown, given that he never actually got to make his case in open court given that Charles refused to plead.

The bits of this book where Robertson is delving into the details of the legal intricacies of the case against the king, and then the differences in procedure between that trial and the proceedings against the regicide are riveting. The parts where he attempts to link these events to the late-twentieth-century trials for crimes against humanity felt less successful, and Robertson's very strong inclination to the republican side makes his criticisms of previous historical and legal treatments of the events he covers lose a bit of their punch. ( )
  JBD1 | Apr 1, 2015 |
A well researched well written book. John Cooke is a man that has barely rated a mention in any history book I have read, this book fixes that oversight. Highly recommended to any one with an interest in republican England. ( )
  alexhunter | May 18, 2013 |
Excellent review of the life of a great man, and a well written account of a time when England struggled, however, feebly towards a just society. Robertson skilfully and engagingly writes a biography of John Cooke, the lawyer who successfully prosecuted Charles 1st for tyranny and war crimes. Long live the Republic! ( )
  Traveller1 | Mar 30, 2013 |
I reviewed this book for the Portland Phoenix. ( )
  jinglis | Oct 24, 2012 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 11 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

» Afegeix-hi altres autors

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Robertson, GeoffreyAutorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Coques, GonzalesAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (2)

"John Cooke was a plebeian, son of a poor Leicestershire farmer. His puritan conscience, political vision and love of civil liberty gave him the courage to bring the King's trail to its dramatic conclusion: the English republic. Cromwell appointed him as a reforming Chief Justice in Ireland, but in 1660 he was dragged back to the Old Bailey, tried and brutally executed." "Geoffrey Robertson, the internationally renowned human rights lawyer, provides a new reading of the tumultuous Civil War years, exposing long-hidden truths: that the King was guilty as charged; that his execution was necessary to establish the sovereignty of Parliament; that the regicide trials were rigged and their victims should be seen as national heroes." "John Cooke was the bravest of barristers, who risked his own life to make tyranny a crime. He originated the right to silence, the 'cab rank' rule of advocacy and the duty to act free-of-charge for the poor. He conducted the first trial of a Head of State for waging war on his own people - a forerunner of the prosecutions of Pinochet, Milosevic and Saddam Hussein, and a lasting inspiration to the modern world."--BOOK JACKET.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.15)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3 3
3.5 3
4 17
4.5 3
5 12

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 163,193,941 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible