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Life With Father - The World's Best Reading…
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Life With Father - The World's Best Reading (1935 original; edició 1993)

de Clarence; Illustrations by Ellison Day, Mick; Afterword by Brown, Robert M.

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
596929,367 (3.62)41
Life with Father was not, for the members of his family, an undiluted pleasure. Set in 1890s New York, Clarence Day's wonderful comic tales of his father, Clarence 'Clare' Day Snr, portray a rambunctious, short-fused Wall Street broker who demands that everything from his family (and other menials) should be just so. When it isn't, all hell breaks loose and an amusing sight it is too from a safe enough distance. Clare is intolerant and tyrannical in his constant battle to harness the world to his way of thinking. He rages against his wife, his cook, his horse, shopkeepers, servants and, of course, his children and their inability to live up to his impossible standards. Yet, the more he blusters and rails, the more comic a figure he cuts. Clarence Day's Life with Father, originally serialised in the New Yorker, is a timeless classic of American humour. Book jacket.… (més)
Membre:dominionfamily
Títol:Life With Father - The World's Best Reading
Autors:Clarence; Illustrations by Ellison Day, Mick; Afterword by Brown, Robert M.
Informació:Reader's Digest Association (1993), Hardcover
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Memoir, Humor

Detalls de l'obra

Life with Father de Clarence Day (1935)

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Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
i remember liking this as a tv show. a good story of living with your parents, ( )
  mahallett | Nov 7, 2018 |
Having long been a fan of the 1947 movie of the same name, reading this book was long, long overdue for me. While reading along I couldn’t help but imagine the cherished William Powell and Irene Dunne having at each other. It does make me wonder how the story would have struck me without the pretext of the movie to look back on with such strong visuals.

The Clarence Sr. of the movie is tempestuous and cantankerous of nature but fundamentally one is left with a positive impression. The viewer never really doubts that he is a good man at heart but one cannot avoid the conclusion that he would be a royal pain to live with. Perhaps in part this is Powell shining through in the role but no matter how many times Father storms about the house at the end of it all you do still rather like him.

Father of the book is just as blustery and just as much of a tempest in a teacup but it costs one quite a bit more effort to like him. The author himself (Clarence Jr) goes to small and periodic effort to endear the reader to his father but the attempts ring rather hollow like a man whose protagonist is watching over his shoulder as he writes. There seems just an edge of boyhood resentment that is very carefully scraped off in the movie’s portrayal of Father.

It is also of note that while the cinematic version is relatively connected and sequential the book takes no such formalities. It seems to jump rather randomly from episode to episode and one is left asking periodically in what decade the particular tidbit is taking place. As such it makes for a very light read but one that requires the reader to throw away any notion of cause and effect.

The thread that I came away with most solidly from this bit of literature was less about the book and more about the movie which came after. Powell’s Clarence is eerily like the Clarence of the text almost as if the role was made for him specifically. The romantic and nostalgic side of me wants to believe that this is because movies in the 40s were a craft and that viewers would notice and object strongly if their beloved characters of fiction are tinkered with even in the slightest. The fact that the plot itself, if you call a disconnected episodic assortment of remembrances a plot, was only remotely similar seems of little import. In these not-entirely-to-be-believed halcyon days of yore it was character that was important to the viewing public. Today all we want is more and bloodier gun battles between larger and more foul-mouthed devotees of thuggery.

If I allow myself to wax realistic for a moment I admit that doubtless my palate has been so repeatedly whitewashed by the movie version of Clarence that I’m not longer intellectually capable of seeing a Clarence Day Sr without seeing William Powell. Psychology of repetition and ordinality aside, Day’s 1920 novel is high on my recommended reading list. ( )
1 vota slavenrm | Apr 29, 2013 |
Having long been a fan of the 1947 movie of the same name, reading this book was long, long overdue for me. While reading along I couldn’t help but imagine the cherished William Powell and Irene Dunne having at each other. It does make me wonder how the story would have struck me without the pretext of the movie to look back on with such strong visuals.

The Clarence Sr. of the movie is tempestuous and cantankerous of nature but fundamentally one is left with a positive impression. The viewer never really doubts that he is a good man at heart but one cannot avoid the conclusion that he would be a royal pain to live with. Perhaps in part this is Powell shining through in the role but no matter how many times Father storms about the house at the end of it all you do still rather like him.

Father of the book is just as blustery and just as much of a tempest in a teacup but it costs one quite a bit more effort to like him. The author himself (Clarence Jr) goes to small and periodic effort to endear the reader to his father but the attempts ring rather hollow like a man whose protagonist is watching over his shoulder as he writes. There seems just an edge of boyhood resentment that is very carefully scraped off in the movie’s portrayal of Father.

It is also of note that while the cinematic version is relatively connected and sequential the book takes no such formalities. It seems to jump rather randomly from episode to episode and one is left asking periodically in what decade the particular tidbit is taking place. As such it makes for a very light read but one that requires the reader to throw away any notion of cause and effect.

The thread that I came away with most solidly from this bit of literature was less about the book and more about the movie which came after. Powell’s Clarence is eerily like the Clarence of the text almost as if the role was made for him specifically. The romantic and nostalgic side of me wants to believe that this is because movies in the 40s were a craft and that viewers would notice and object strongly if their beloved characters of fiction are tinkered with even in the slightest. The fact that the plot itself, if you call a disconnected episodic assortment of remembrances a plot, was only remotely similar seems of little import. In these not-entirely-to-be-believed halcyon days of yore it was character that was important to the viewing public. Today all we want is more and bloodier gun battles between larger and more foul-mouthed devotees of thuggery.

If I allow myself to wax realistic for a moment I admit that doubtless my palate has been so repeatedly whitewashed by the movie version of Clarence that I’m not longer intellectually capable of seeing a Clarence Day Sr without seeing William Powell. Psychology of repetition and ordinality aside, Day’s 1920 novel is high on my recommended reading list. ( )
1 vota slavenrm | Apr 5, 2013 |
Not at funny as it should have been.
  marfita | Mar 7, 2011 |
I saw the movie first (with William Powell? and Elizabeth Taylor) which I love. The book didn't add much to that enjoyment (not that I'm knocking it). ( )
  br77rino | Jan 10, 2011 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
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Once in a long while, as a great treat, Father took me down to his office.
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Life with Father was not, for the members of his family, an undiluted pleasure. Set in 1890s New York, Clarence Day's wonderful comic tales of his father, Clarence 'Clare' Day Snr, portray a rambunctious, short-fused Wall Street broker who demands that everything from his family (and other menials) should be just so. When it isn't, all hell breaks loose and an amusing sight it is too from a safe enough distance. Clare is intolerant and tyrannical in his constant battle to harness the world to his way of thinking. He rages against his wife, his cook, his horse, shopkeepers, servants and, of course, his children and their inability to live up to his impossible standards. Yet, the more he blusters and rails, the more comic a figure he cuts. Clarence Day's Life with Father, originally serialised in the New Yorker, is a timeless classic of American humour. Book jacket.

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