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The Man With The Getaway Face (Parker, #2)…
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The Man With The Getaway Face (Parker, #2) (edició 1963)

de Richard Stark

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
4981136,649 (3.87)18
Parker, the ruthless antihero of Richard Stark's eponymous mystery novels, is one of the most unforgettable characters in hard-boiled noir. Lauded by critics for his taut realism, unapologetic amorality, and razor-sharp prose, Stark is a master of crime writing. His books are as influential as any in the genre. Parker goes under the knife in The Man with the Getaway Face, changing his face to escape the mob and a contract on his life. Along the way he scores his biggest heist yet: an armored car in New Jersey, stuffed with cash.… (més)
Membre:MidwestGeek
Títol:The Man With The Getaway Face (Parker, #2)
Autors:Richard Stark
Informació:Pocket Books, Mass Market Paperback, 225 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:****
Etiquetes:Goodreads 12-29-17

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The Man with the Getaway Face de Richard Stark

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» Mira també 18 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 11 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Cross and double cross
who wouldn't be suspicious?
broads can't be trusted. ( )
  Eggpants | Jun 25, 2020 |
Reading this is what I imagine people who like math feel as they solve problems--there's a problem, Parker figures out how to solve it, and he does. He has no wit, sense of humor, passions, inner life, or thoughts about things other than The Problem at Hand. He doesn't feel relief, pride, or anything that would suggest why he makes his living by being a thief. He's a fascinating, amoral, near-cyborg. ( )
  Stubb | Aug 28, 2018 |
Donald Westlake, under his alter ego, Richard Stark has penned 24 Parker novels, beginning with 1962's the Hunter, continuing with The Man With The Getaway Face (1963), The Outfit (1963), The Mourner (1963), and up until 2008's Dirty Money. Parker is a thief, pure and simple, but he is not a gentleman burglar. He is not a frustrated ordinary man on the run from the law. Rather, he is a ruthless thug, who has little warmth for anyone and simply wants to get the job done. It is not necessary to read the Parker novels in order, although it helps to understand some of the context.

In the first novel, Parker was robbed by his wife and partner, shot, and left for dead. They didn't count on his survival ability and he came back after them with a vengeance. His money that Mal had stolen from him had been paid to the Outfit (also known as the Syndicate) because Mal had owed a significant debt. Although the Outfit has a staff numbering in the hundreds (like the post office) and they are coast to coast, Parker is not deterred and is determined to get his money. No amount of tough guys seems able to stand in his way, although he leaves behind some enemies who, one of these days, mean to take him out- if they can.

At the end of the first book (the Hunter), Parker metaphorically rides off into the sunset, knowing that a lot of people have their eyes out for him. As the second book ("The Man With the Getaway Face") begins, Parker has gone to Nebraska because he heard of a doctor who could change people's faces. Remember, this is a 1963 novel when plastic surgery was such an amazing concept that it was assumed you could become completely unrecognizable after such surgery. On leaving the doctor's office, Parker is warned by Stubbs (the shofar, etc for the doctor) that his secret is safe, but he better not think about coming after the doctor or the entire world will learn about his new identity. Let's call this foreshadowing because it becomes hugely significant later in the story. Most of the Man with the Getaway Face is consumed with Parker's efforts to pull of a heist of an armored car. He is not entirely sure of the loyalty of his accomplices and has some doubts if this heist is going sour. Some of the doubts are about his accomplices, particularly Alma, but the real bugaboo is when Stubbs shows up, saying that the doctor is dead and Parker is one of only three suspects and Stubbs may not be a lot of things, but he is going to avenge the doctor.

Parker is the same tough, no-nonsense hombre from the first book, but the pace and the level of violence is not quite as frenetic in this volume. It's a good, tight plot that just hums along without a break. Parker here is not a barbarian back from the dead hell-bent for revenge. Nah, he just wants this armored car robbery to go off without a hitch. Parker's not cruel. He just wants to get the job done.
The story here feels a bit minor compared to the great ball busting burst of energy that was the first book, but a good solid crime caper story.
( )
  DaveWilde | Sep 22, 2017 |
The best compliment I can give the "Parker" novels by Donald E. Westlake is to admit that they've completely hijacked my usual schedule of reading and reviewing contemporary novels for the CCLaP website; originally planned to be a fun airplane diversion when I flew from Chicago to New Orleans and back about three weeks ago, I ended up reading the first book in the series, 1962's The Hunter, from start to finish in just half a day, and have since been greedily devouring the rest at a rate of a book or two every week, blowing off all my other reading commitments no matter how much I realize I shouldn't. (Sorry, all you authors who are patiently waiting for your book to be reviewed at CCLaP.)

That's high praise indeed from someone who usually doesn't like crime novels that much, with the key being that the main character is just so utterly fascinating, who like Ayn Rand's Howard Roark is less a real human being and more an example of the "theoretically perfect" version of the philosophy the author is trying to espouse (Stoicism here in the case of Westlake, versus Objectivism in the case of Rand). A professional thief who only pulls off one heist a year (netting him in today's terms somewhere between a quarter-million and a half-million dollars each time), so that he can spend the other 51 weeks lounging poolside at resort hotels and having rough sex with trust-fund blue-bloods with a taste for danger, Parker doesn't give even the tiniest little fuck about anything or anyone that falls outside of this monomaniacal routine, never negotiates nor compromises when it comes to his take or who he'll work with, doesn't have even the slightest hesitation about torturing or killing people who get in his way (yet avoids doing it anyway, simply because physical abuse is the "lazy" way to get what one wants, and being lazy is the first step towards getting caught), and possesses a psychotic distaste for such banal activities like "talking" and "having friends" or "acknowledging the inherent worth of the human race." (A true misanthrope, these pre-PC novels are not for the linguistically faint at heart, filled on every page with dismissive contempt for women, homosexuals, and people of color; although in Parker's "defense," such as it is, he also displays such contempt for most of the straight white males he meets too.)

There are 24 novels in the Parker series (which Westlake published under the pen-name "Richard Stark"), most from the '60s and early '70s, the series then activated again in the late '90s and up until Westlake's death in 2008; but the first three form a trilogy of sorts, in that they all concern one overarching storyline that spans from one book to the next, and so make a tidy reading experience for those who are curious about the series but don't want to make a 24-book commitment. (Most of the others are franchise-style standalone stories that each follow a similar blueprint -- Parker decides on his heist for that year, Parker obsessively plans out his heist for that year, then everything goes to hell when Parker actually tries pulling off his heist for that year.) The first, The Hunter, will seem familiar to many because it's been made into a movie so many times (including 1967's Point Blank with Lee Marvin, 1999's Payback with Mel Gibson, and 2013's Parker with Jason Statham); in it, we pick up a year after a heist that went bad because of a duplicitous partner, who needed both his share and Parker's in order to pay back the Mafia for an old job gone bad, the novel itself consisting of Parker basically crisscrossing the country and getting his revenge on every person who had been involved, eventually provoking the ire of the Mafia when he insists that they pay him back the money that had been stolen from him, even though they had nothing to do with the actual theft. The second book, then, 1963's The Man With the Getaway Face, sees Parker get plastic surgery in order to stay out of the glare of the Mafia's nationwide murder contract they now have out on him, just to have his new face divulged to the Mafia at the very end; so then in the third novel, The Outfit from later that same year, Parker decides to get the Mafia off his tail once and for all, enlisting his buddies-in-crime to pull off Mafia-victim heists across the country to the modern tune of ten million dollars in a single month, while he tracks down and kills the head of the entire organization by breaking into a mansion that's been weaponized like a fortress, after affecting a promise from the number-two in charge that he'll end the persecution if Parker does him this "favor."

Like Parker himself, these novels are quick and lean, part of what makes them so obsessively readable; Westlake had a real talent for stripping narratives down to just their bare essentials, then cleverly invented a character for whom this fast-paced minimalism works perfectly, a true human monster but one you can't help but root for anyway, if for no other reason than because he has zero tolerance for the chatty bullshit and regards for acquaintances' feelings that you as a non-psychotic are forced to deal with in your own schmucky non-bank-robbing life. (Stupid schmucky non-bank-robbing life!) Unfortunately my obsessive focus on these books must come to an end soon -- I simply have to get back to the novels I'm "supposed" to be reading, plus I can already tell by the fifth book that this series gets a lot more formulaic as it continues, which I bet will dampen my enthusiasm on its own -- but I couldn't let the opportunity pass by to mention how unexpectedly thrilled I was by at least the first few books in the lineup, picked up on a whim completely randomly but that have turned out to be some of my favorite reading experiences of the entire last year. They come strongly recommended whenever you have some downtime soon, especially to those like me who aren't natural fans of this genre to begin with. ( )
  jasonpettus | Jun 2, 2017 |
The second book in the Parker series isn't quite as "hard-boiled" as the first book (The Hunter), but still a great read (what else would you expect from Westlake!). I'm looking forward to the next book, "The Outfit". ( )
  bjkelley | Jan 17, 2017 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 11 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Stark’s novels are not only entertaining for what they are—midcentury noirs—but they are also better than a lot of what was coming out back then.
 

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Parker, the ruthless antihero of Richard Stark's eponymous mystery novels, is one of the most unforgettable characters in hard-boiled noir. Lauded by critics for his taut realism, unapologetic amorality, and razor-sharp prose, Stark is a master of crime writing. His books are as influential as any in the genre. Parker goes under the knife in The Man with the Getaway Face, changing his face to escape the mob and a contract on his life. Along the way he scores his biggest heist yet: an armored car in New Jersey, stuffed with cash.

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