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The Road to Wigan Pier de George Orwell
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The Road to Wigan Pier (1937 original; edició 1972)

de George Orwell (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
2,842433,596 (3.83)124
In the 1930s Orwell was sent by a socialist book club to investigate the appalling mass unemployment in the industrial north of England. He went beyond his assignment to investigate the employed as well-" to see the most typical section of the English working class." Foreword by Victor Gollancz.
Membre:greg_howard
Títol:The Road to Wigan Pier
Autors:George Orwell (Autor)
Informació:Mariner Books (1972), 256 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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The Road to Wigan Pier de George Orwell (1937)

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» Mira també 124 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 43 (següent | mostra-les totes)
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  pszolovits | Feb 3, 2021 |
Essential reading today more than ever as we realize our mechanized future. I only wish that I had read this in my twenties. I really could have used a few slaps from Orwell back then. ( )
  skroah | Dec 14, 2020 |
It's just a treat to read(listen to) his writings... The style is beautiful ( )
  marshapetry | Oct 16, 2020 |
Gives you the chance to live the life of the people history class never taught you about. These are the daily lives of people whose names have long been forgotten, and you get to see their pain through Orwell's words. I ((((((cried))))) ( )
  ncharlt1 | Sep 28, 2020 |
My third Orwell in as many weeks, if you’re keeping score.

Part 1 is his tour through the living conditions of the working class in industrial Lancashire and Yorkshire, primarily coal miners and the unemployed. Part 2 is an examination of the feelings of middle class British socialists (virtually all British socialists, Orwell included, being middle class) and the British working class (virtually none of them socialists) towards each other. He concludes that British class feeling is basically impossible to eradicate and that British socialists would do well to stop vilifying the middle class, i.e., themselves, because everybody can smell a phony.

It was first published with grave reservations by noted lefty publisher Victor Gollancz as a selection of the Left Book Club. He tried to get Orwell to let him publish part 1 without part 2, but Orwell refused. The compromise was that Gollancz published the whole thing but also included a forward he wrote in which he more or less apologizes to every member of the Left Book Club and repudiates all of part 2, which includes gems like this:

"The first thing that must strike any outside observer is that Socialism, in its developed form is a theory confined entirely to the middle classes. The typical Socialist is not, as tremulous old ladies imagine, a ferocious-looking working man with greasy overalls and a raucous voice. He is either a youthful snob-Bolshevik who in five years’ time will quite probably have made a wealthy marriage and been converted to Roman Catholicism; or, still more typically, a prim little man with a white-collar job, usually a secret teetotaller and often with vegetarian leanings, with a history of Nonconformity behind him, and, above all, with a social position which he has no intention of forfeiting. This last type is surprisingly common in Socialist parties of every shade; it has perhaps been taken over en bloc from the old Liberal Party. In addition to this there is the horrible—the really disquieting—prevalence of cranks wherever Socialists are gathered together. One sometimes gets the impression that the mere words ‘Socialism’ and ‘Communism’ draw towards them with magnetic force every fruit-juice drinker, nudist, sandal-wearer, sex-maniac, Quaker, ‘Nature Cure’ quack, pacifist, and feminist in England."

(Tag yourself in that last bit.)

Think of all of those sad British lefties in 1937, crying into their warm beers when they read that.

Even so, part 1 was compelling enough that I am convinced that no owner of a colliery has ever been admitted to Heaven. Absolutely brutal. ( )
  k6gst | Feb 12, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 43 (següent | mostra-les totes)
(Retracing...)
Orwell said he would find little to interest him in Barnsley, which was a kindness compared to his verdict on Sheffield: "It seems to me, by daylight, one of the most appalling places I have ever seen." From his two months in the north, one image stayed with him above all others; a pale young woman "with the usual draggled, exhausted look … I thought how dreadful a destiny it was to be kneeling in the gutter in a back alley in Wigan, in the bitter cold, prodding a stick up a blocked drain. At that moment she looked up and caught my eye, and her expression was as desolate as I have ever seen; it struck me that she was thinking just the same as I was."

We cannot know if he was right, but it seems a rare moment, in a book about human sympathy, of connection between the man raised to be an officer of the empire and the proletariat that, however much he wished to embrace, repelled him still. Jack Hilton, the man who set him on the road to Wigan, hated the book, judging it a failure and falling out with the author. "So George went to Wigan and he might have stayed at home. He wasted money, energy and wrote piffle," was his damning verdict. Victor Gollancz disagreed, but with strong reservations. He finally published it as part of the Left Book Club series, but included a foreword in which he rebutted Orwell's colourful views on the "fruit-drinkers" of the middle-class liberal elite, fearful that his readership might take offence. In a later edition, against the author's wishes, he deleted the polemical second section altogether.
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (26 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
George Orwellautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Demeter, LizDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Gollancz, VictorPròlegautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hoggart, RichardIntroduccióautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Jennings, AlexNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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The first sound in the mornings was the clumping of the mill-girls' clogs down the cobbled street.
Foreword:  This Foreword is addressed to members of the Left book Club (to whom The Road to Wigan Pier is being sent as the March Choice), and to them alone:  members of the general public are asked to ignore it.
Citacions
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[those who live in Letchworth] every fruit-juice drinker, nudist, sandal wearer, sex maniac, escaped Quaker, "Nature Cure" quack, pacifist and feminist in England,
If only the sandals and the pistachio-coloured shirts could be put in a pile and burnt, and every vegetarian, teetotaller, and creeping Jesus sent home to Welwyn Garden City to do his yoga exercise quietly.
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No n'hi ha cap

In the 1930s Orwell was sent by a socialist book club to investigate the appalling mass unemployment in the industrial north of England. He went beyond his assignment to investigate the employed as well-" to see the most typical section of the English working class." Foreword by Victor Gollancz.

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