IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Black Sea (1995)

de Neal Ascherson

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
5881029,964 (4)10
Black Seais a homage to an ocean and its shores and a meditation on Eurasian history, from the earliest times to the present. It explores the culture, history and politics of the volatile region which surrounds the Black Sea. Ascherson recalls the world of Herodotus and Aeschylus; Ovid's place of exile on what is now the coast of Romania; the decline and fall of Byzantium; the mysterious Christian Goths; the Tatar Khanates; the growth of Russian power across the grasslands, and the centuries of war between Ottoman and Russian Empires around the Black Sea. He examines the terrors of Stalinism and its fascist enemy, both striving for mastery of these endlessly colourful and complex shores, and investigates the turbulent history of modern Ukraine. This is a story of Greeks, Scythians, Samatians, Huns, Goths, Turks, Russians, Ukrainians and Poles. This is the sea where Europe ended. It is the place where 'barbarism' was born. UPDATED WITH A NEW FOREWORD BY THE AUTHOR… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 10 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 10 (següent | mostra-les totes)
A fine travelogue covering thousands of kilometres and years around the Black Sea region of Asia Minor. Ascherson is renowned as a leading historian and mixes history with his own impressions while travelling around the Black Sea.

Ascherson touches on the Ilyrians, Abhkazia, the Pontic Greeks and a range of other topics, all in an entertaining, page turning style. ( )
  MiaCulpa | Feb 5, 2018 |
The Black Sea has a fascinating history and this book does a good job of providing an overview of that history ( )
  M_Clark | Apr 26, 2016 |
Neal Ascherson reúne la condición de historiador y arqueólogo con la de corresponsal y periodista. Como experto en la región del mar Negro, nos invita a acompañarle en su expedición por esta zona prácticamente desconocida, pero no menos fundamental en la historia y el nacimiento de nuestra cultura, cruce de Oriente y Occidente, cuna de civilizaciones y también de la barbarie. ( )
  BibliotecaUNED | Jun 20, 2013 |
Best history book I've read this year (and the last, as it happens). Brilliant range of references covering 3000 years and more of history. Umpteen people, peoples, and places I've never or scarcely heard of as well as some good ecoscience thrown in. E.g. the Abkhazians who I proudly thought i knew included the charming Beria, but no, he was a Mingrelian. We get deep insights into Polish nationalism (its founding poet father Minkiewicz was exiled to the Black Sea). Ovid gets a mention (knew he was there but he springs to life in this account). the Pontic Greeks i'd heard of but here we get their whole flourish and fade and how they nurse their traditions still. Golden Horde and Mongol, Cossack, Kazakh and Tatar ride across the pages and seem to be different names for more or less one thing.(Side shots touch on Scottish nationalism, the Gaelic revival, the invention of the knight at arms, perestroika, Near the end we learn of Harald Hardrade (know him from Stamford Bridge at the margins of English history but hey! he was a commander of mercenaries for the Byzantine emperor and rammed his way out through the chain over the Bosporus. Here and there his first hand travel experiences: meetings with sad librarians, unfunded scientists, selfless archaeologists, a museum of sycophantic tributes to Brezhnev, a disabled girl's death on a bus. The book appears structureless; not a travelogue, nor a chronology, with so much going on and most of it new to me it should have been confusing, but themes are interwoven, sometimes reappearing, sewn together with such weightless scholarshop and seamless style, I was sorry to finish it. ( )
1 vota vguy | Jan 1, 2013 |
I consider this as a companion to the massive and brilliant 750 page tome on the Mediterranean and its peoples I am currently reading by David Abulafia The Great Sea (http://www.librarything.com/work/11256104) but it is written in a lighter and more easily read prose … but none the less scholarly… because of Neal Ascherson’s journalistic phrasing. You would not find the expression ”muddy-arsed squireens” (p.231) used by many historians and it is Ascherson’s human touch that makes this book such an enjoyable read.

Both books are histories back to the time of Herodotus, and both are concerned with the anthropology of the settlers of these seas but while Abulafia covers the whole of those great seas that make up the “Med”, Ascherson concentrates his 300 pages on just the one.

But the Black Sea has had more head-spinning confusions, churnings and population waves that a washing machine! From early Greek, Iranian and Viking settlers through pogroms, communism and collapse to our modern concerns with the dangerous ecological threat this region has experienced constant – and for readers – fascinating turmoil.

Neal Ascherson is an author with a strong background career grounded in journalism and gives us, in this book, an eminently readable and very personal (his own father as a Royal Naval midshipman in 1920 saw the Russian fleet withdrawing) account of the trials and churning of the peoples of this region in their struggle and search for homeland and identify. I was recently (2012) in Ukraine and saw some of this whirlpool and that obviously added to my personal enjoyment of this work which is thoroughly recommended for those readers who enjoy history in a very readable form.
2 vota John_Vaughan | Jun 6, 2012 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 10 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Although geographically centered, Neal Ascherson’s BLACK SEA is not primarily about geography; rather, it concerns the people who, over the centuries, migrated to the shores of this inland sea that separates East from West, “the largest mass of lifeless water in the world,” extending 144 miles from the Crimean peninsula to the Bosporus and the Dardanelles. There is life at the top, schools of dolphin and porpoise, the once- abundant Black Sea anchovy, and a kind of mackerel called the bonito, but 150 meters below the surface of the Black Sea “is the world’s biggest single reservoir of hydrogen sulphide,” and the deeper waters are therefore sterile.
 
To unlock the mystery of creativity, cultural confluence and violent conflict associated with the Black Sea, Ascherson has eschewed conventional history. In its place, he trudges gamely around archaeological sites, some famous, some profoundly obscure. His ruminations on the bones and artefacts of long-extinct peoples drift effortlessly from their ancient history into our millennium and back, from Herodotus to Lermontov, and from the Zaporozhe Sich of the Cossacks to the loners on the Oregon trail.
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (3 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Ascherson, Nealautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Davids, TinkeTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Larsson, Lars G.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Linnér, SturePròlegautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
To my Father
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
One day early in 1680, a young Italian named Luigi Ferdinando Marsigli stood on a boat anchored in the middle of the Bosporus, off Istanbul, and lowered a weighted line over the side.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (5)

Black Seais a homage to an ocean and its shores and a meditation on Eurasian history, from the earliest times to the present. It explores the culture, history and politics of the volatile region which surrounds the Black Sea. Ascherson recalls the world of Herodotus and Aeschylus; Ovid's place of exile on what is now the coast of Romania; the decline and fall of Byzantium; the mysterious Christian Goths; the Tatar Khanates; the growth of Russian power across the grasslands, and the centuries of war between Ottoman and Russian Empires around the Black Sea. He examines the terrors of Stalinism and its fascist enemy, both striving for mastery of these endlessly colourful and complex shores, and investigates the turbulent history of modern Ukraine. This is a story of Greeks, Scythians, Samatians, Huns, Goths, Turks, Russians, Ukrainians and Poles. This is the sea where Europe ended. It is the place where 'barbarism' was born. UPDATED WITH A NEW FOREWORD BY THE AUTHOR

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2 4
2.5
3 10
3.5 6
4 40
4.5 6
5 18

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 157,856,719 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible