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The Works of Philo: Complete and Unabridged,…
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The Works of Philo: Complete and Unabridged, New Updated Edition (edició 1993)

de C. D. Yonge

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Philo, known also as Philo of Alexandria, Philo Judaeus, and Philo the Jew, among other names, was a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who lived in Alexandria from 20 BC to 50 CE. Philo's works are most known for being allegorical interpretations of the Scriptures, fusing Jewish thought to Stoic philosophy. Although not widely accepted in his time, his vast collection of works had a powerful influence on early Christian theology and especially on later Christian writers like Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Saint Jerome and Athenagorus. Despite being a devout Jew, some saw in Philo a cryptic Christian. This is the third of four volumes of The Works of Philo, and contains many of his cosmogenic, historical and political works like On the Life of Moses, On Monarchy, On Justice, On Rewards and Punishments, and To Prove that Every Man who is Virtuous is Also Free.… (més)
Membre:thegg
Títol:The Works of Philo: Complete and Unabridged, New Updated Edition
Autors:C. D. Yonge
Informació:Hendrickson Publishers (1993), Hardcover, 944 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
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The Works of Philo de C. D. Yonge

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Much easier to read than Josephus. Must read this latest translation. New type set, 13th printing. ( )
  BelindaCharp | Nov 14, 2020 |
Philo was a contemporary of Jesus and Paul. But resided in Alexandria Egypt.
  T.E.I. | Aug 21, 2019 |
From the theology reading program. This was something of a strain; it’s a 1993 reprint of an 1855 translation made by Biblical scholar C.D. Yonge. The original translation was four volumes; it’s reproduced here in a single volume of double-column fine print. As a result, it was hard to work through.

Philo lived in Alexandria (he made a trip to Rome to petition – unsuccessfully – Caligula not to have a statue of himself installed in the Temple in Jerusalem). What he’s trying to do is sell Judaism to Greek philosophers; not necessary with a view toward conversion but at least for understanding. He was well educated in Greek literature, and routinely quotes Homer and various philosophers. (Ironically, based on some of the etymology he uses, it’s thought he didn’t know Hebrew). Although a contemporary of John the Baptist, Jesus and St. Paul, Philo never mentions them (although he does mention the Essenes at some length, with approval).

Most of the work is exegesis of the Torah. Philo is not a Biblical literalist – in fact, for Philo, everything in the Bible is symbolic. The Creation doesn’t actually take six days nor does the world and its life appear in the literal order described in Genesis; instead the six days are symbolic because “six is the most productive of all numbers”. (In fact Philo displays minor outrage over the idea that the “…Creator stood in need of a length of time…”). Thus, everything is created instantaneously by thought – but Moses writes it down as six days for the symbolic value. Similarly the order of appearance of animals, the extraction of Adam’s rib, the naming of the animals, the garden, the talking serpent, the Tree, the murder of Abel, the Ark, the Flood, and so on are all symbolic and do not represent actual animals, ribs, names, gardens, snakes, trees, murders, arks or floods. As with the “six days”, all these things are explainable by gematria. It gets fairly deep sometimes; there are three pages on the symbolism of the dimensions of the Ark and similar elaborations on the numerological meaning of the ages of the various patriarchs; almost every number that appears in the Torah gets divided or multiplied or both so Philo can make some numerological point. Well, I had no idea people thought that way back then, but as you might expect it gets amazingly tedious after a while.

One minor thing that interested me, amidst all the numbers, was a short discussion of circumcision. The Hellenistic world was skeptical, so I expected another symbolic explanation – oddly, though, Philo falls back on health reasons rather than numerology. Of further interest is his comment that contemporary Egyptians circumcise both boys and girls, just before marriage (which is still the practice for girls, unfortunately; and it’s euphemistic to call the practice for women “circumcision” rather than “genital mutilation”). Philo, of course, is talking about Roman era Egyptians. I’ve seen quite a few mummies of Pharaonic era male Egyptians and when the relevant bits were exposed to view they were all circumcised (there’s an Old Kingdom tomb relief of a circumcision which is not only the oldest depiction of a circumcision; it’s the oldest depiction of any surgical operation). Uncircumcised male mummies are known, however. For women it’s more difficult as almost all female mummies are wrapped in a more “modest” position than male mummies; I don’t believe I’ve ever seen one with the genitalia exposed. I don’t remember any Egyptological book, even ones specifically about mummies or mummification, commenting on the existence of the practice. Thus if Philo’s claim is true it would suggest the practice was introduced late in Egyptian history and carried over into Islamic times.

Well, I got this on remainder, but it’s now available online (including, strangely enough, a Latin translation of the Greek original in the Loeb library) so there’s no particular reason to buy one. Can’t really recommend it except to collectors and the OCD’d. ( )
  setnahkt | Dec 31, 2017 |
NO OF PAGES: 918 SUB CAT I: First Century Judaism SUB CAT II: History SUB CAT III: DESCRIPTION: Philo the Jewish historian lived from about 20 B.C. to about A.D. 50. He is one of the most important Jewish authors of the Second Temple period of Judaism and was a contemporary of both Jesus and Paul. Philo wrote in Greek.NOTES: SUBTITLE: Complete and Unabridged
  BeitHallel | Feb 18, 2011 |
Reprint of 1854-55 Bohn library version. ( )
  antiquary | Aug 16, 2007 |
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» Afegeix-hi altres autors (6 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
C. D. Yongeautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Bellier, PierreTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Morel, FrédéricEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Yonge, C.D.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Yonge, Charles DukeTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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Philo, known also as Philo of Alexandria, Philo Judaeus, and Philo the Jew, among other names, was a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who lived in Alexandria from 20 BC to 50 CE. Philo's works are most known for being allegorical interpretations of the Scriptures, fusing Jewish thought to Stoic philosophy. Although not widely accepted in his time, his vast collection of works had a powerful influence on early Christian theology and especially on later Christian writers like Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Saint Jerome and Athenagorus. Despite being a devout Jew, some saw in Philo a cryptic Christian. This is the third of four volumes of The Works of Philo, and contains many of his cosmogenic, historical and political works like On the Life of Moses, On Monarchy, On Justice, On Rewards and Punishments, and To Prove that Every Man who is Virtuous is Also Free.

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