IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Lavinia (2008)

de Ursula K. Le Guin

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,699837,487 (3.83)204
In The Aeneid, Vergil's hero fights to claim the king's daughter, Lavinia, with whom he is destined to found an empire. Lavinia herself never speaks a word in the poem. Now, Ursula K. Le Guin gives Lavinia a voice in a novel that takes the reader to the half-wild world of ancient Italy, when Rome was a muddy village near seven hills.… (més)
  1. 71
    The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus de Margaret Atwood (rarm)
  2. 10
    The Sibyl de Pär Lagerkvist (Limelite)
    Limelite: Interpretational tales about female Greek mythological characters Both books have plot twists and are rather weird and strange and dream-like
  3. 10
    Black Ships de Jo Graham (sturlington)
    sturlington: Aeneas legend told from POV of women
  4. 10
    Circe de Madeline Miller (g33kgrrl)
    g33kgrrl: Retellings from the untold, female perspective.
  5. 10
    La filla d'Homer de Robert Graves (EveleenM)
  6. 01
    Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold de C. S. Lewis (casvelyn)
    casvelyn: Both are stories of strong, motherless women with dysfunctional families who play a part in a mythical tale
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 204 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 83 (següent | mostra-les totes)
This is the final six books of the Aeneid from Lavinia's perspective. It isn't always riveting (I think the same of the source material), but I like the voice the protagonist is given and I like reviewing the events of the epic through her perspective. ( )
  ctanons | Jan 26, 2021 |
an incredibly comfortable read, it's like wallowing in a treasured memory or daydream. a beautiful book. ( )
  mjhunt | Jan 22, 2021 |
An interesting book. As usual, Le Guin's prose is nearly flawless, and her ability to convey complex ideas simply is unparalleled.

If there's anything to criticize about this book, it's that Le Guin doesn't take her ideas far enough. The most interesting part, the part where she could have delved further I think, is the meta nature of Lavinia's conversations with "the poet" and the implications on free will, destiny, etc. She does of course touch these topics, but they are explored only tangentially. And of course she could have gone even further — but possibly not without devolving to a frivolous fictional solipsism a la King's Dark Tower VII.

But that I feel she could have done more does not make the story she told unworthy in any way. It is an interesting tale about a marginal character in the popular (though as Le Guin explains in her Afterword, much less known than it should be) story of the Aeneid. It is, in a way, the contrapositive of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead — and if that means nothing to you, all I can say is that I wish I had Le Guin's trick of stating things more clearly.

I doubt this well ever be my favorite Le Guin story, but it was well worth the time spent reading it, nonetheless. ( )
  octoberdad | Dec 16, 2020 |
I have vivid memories of sight reading Vergil's Aeneid for Latin class and translating chunks of it for homework. That sort of thing fixes the story in one's mind. I don't remember much about Lavinia, other than that she was the woman Aeneas married after landing in Italy. Le Guin brings her to life in this novel as narrator and central actor. This book, like all of Le Guin's writing, delights me, and I hope it introduces some readers to the classics. I think Le Guin would have delighted to see the recent translations of classic epics by women, and also the novels based on characters like Circe and the Trojan women. ( )
  nmele | Sep 9, 2020 |
Lavina crece conociendo únicamente la paz y la libertad hasta la llegada de sus pretendientes. Su madre exige que contraiga matrimonio con el apuesto y ambicioso Turno. Pero los augurios y las profecías de los manantiales sagrados afirman que deberá casarse con un extranjero, que provocará una guerra y que su marido no vivirá demasiado tiempo. Al ver cómo una flota de barcos troyanos remonta el Tíber, la joven decide tomar las riendas de su propio destino.
  Luz_19 | Aug 19, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 83 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Lavinia is a historical novel set in mythical antiquity, Bronze Age Italy in the aftermath of the Trojan War. Le Guin has taken a (very) minor character from Virgil’s epic The Aeneid - in the poem Aeneas’s last wife Lavinia has no line of dialogue whatsoever - and given her voice. And a powerful and seemingly authentic voice too. The landscape, homes, religion, politicking, people and battles are all convincingly portrayed. When reading this you feel as if you are there, immersed in prehistory. Even the scenes in the place of oracles where Lavinia talks to the apparition she knows only as the poet - she could merely be dreaming of course - have the stamp of authority. At any rate Lavinia believes in him, and his revelations are borne out by events. There is, too, enough of a body count - foretold by the poet in a long, disturbing list - to satisfy the bloodthirsty.

For Lavinia starts a war. Not by allowing herself to be taken by men, she says (in a beautifully understated inference to the much more famous Helen) but instead by choosing one for herself. I quibble slightly at who actually chooses Aeneas for Lavinia; she is swayed not only by the lack of suitability of the other candidates for her hand but also by her conversations with the poet. Otherwise she is a strong decisive character, who stands up to both her father, the King Latinus, and mother, Amata, and later to Ascanius, Aeneas’s son by his previous marriage.

Given the book’s context the perennial follies of men are an unsurprising theme of Lavinia, the character and the novel.

Despite its setting the book was on the short list for the BSFA Award for best novel of 2009, which on the face of it is baffling, even if Le Guin is a stalwart of the genres of SF and fantasy. I suppose its proposers could argue that since in the book Lavinia speaks with the ghost of a poet not yet born in her time there is an element of fantasy present. (Le Guin uses the spelling Vergil. I know his Latin name was Vergilius but in my youth the poem was always known as Virgil’s Aeneid.) True too, the past is always a different country. Fictionally it takes as much imagination to invest it with verisimilitude as it does to describe an as yet unrealised (SF) future. Except - sometimes - you can research the past.

This is an admirably realised and executed novel, though, whichever genre you wish to pigeon-hole it with.

Or you could say, as I do, that it is simply an excellent novel, full stop.
afegit per jackdeighton | editaA Son Of The Rock, Jack Deighton
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (15 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Ursula K. Le Guinautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Bresnahan, AlyssaNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Mata, ManuelTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Pennacchietti, NatasciaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Rodotà, CostanzaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Sheckels, JenAutor de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Surgers, MarieTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

Pertany a aquestes col·leccions editorials

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
sola domum et tantas servabat filia sedes,
iam matura viro, iam plenis nubilis annis.
multi illam magno e Latio totaque petebant
Ausonia . . .

A single daughter, now ripe for a man,
now full of marriageable age, kept the great
household. Many from broad Latium and
all Ausonia came wooing her . . .
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
I went to the salt beds by the mouth of the river in the May of my nineteenth year, to get salt for the sacred meal.
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
We are all contingent. Resentment is foolish and ungenerous, and even anger is inadequate. I am a fleck of light on the surface of the sea, a glint of light from the evening star. I live in awe.
I know who I was, I can tell you who I may have been, but I am, now, only in this line of words I write.
Like Spartan Helen, I caused a war. She caused hers by letting men who wanted her take her. I caused mine because I wouldn't be given, wouldn't be taken, but chose my man and my fate. The man was famous, the fate obscure; not a bad balance.
But then I think no, it has nothing to do with being dead, it's not death that allows us to understand one another, but poetry.
Not even a poet can speak the whole truth.
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (1)

In The Aeneid, Vergil's hero fights to claim the king's daughter, Lavinia, with whom he is destined to found an empire. Lavinia herself never speaks a word in the poem. Now, Ursula K. Le Guin gives Lavinia a voice in a novel that takes the reader to the half-wild world of ancient Italy, when Rome was a muddy village near seven hills.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.83)
0.5
1 1
1.5 1
2 22
2.5 8
3 80
3.5 40
4 134
4.5 19
5 86

Recorded Books

Una edició d'aquest llibre ha estat publicada per Recorded Books.

» Pàgina d'informació de l'editor

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 157,210,550 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible